Measuring the impact of digital inclusion at scale (SHLB May 2014)

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My presentation at SHLB May 2014, describing the evaluation metrics and methodologies we use at TInder Foundation and UK online centres. Ranging from: large scale data collection from our MOOC Learn My Way; online and telephone surveys (in the field 52 weeks a year); and deep dive evaluation and volumetrics. Using these three methodologies we've proven that we've saved the UK Government at least £232.4m (more than $1bn) in the past three years - proving digital inclusion does help the bottom line for countries struggling with recession.

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Measuring the impact of digital inclusion at scale (SHLB May 2014)

  1. 1. Scale & Impact Helen Milner, @helenmilner 8 May 2014 Tinder Foundation makes these good things happen:
  2. 2. Tinder Foundation We are a staff-owned mutual and social enterprise Vision: A better world for everyone through the use of digital technology Purpose: We make good things happen through digital technology
  3. 3. Local + Digital + Scale Free £232.4m
  4. 4. UK online centres: community centres, public libraries, cafes, schools, housing, places of worship, fish & chip shop, …. a barn
  5. 5. www.tindfoundation.org/DN
  6. 6. Three ways of measuring impact • Learning Data: automated from Learn My Way, learners, learning activity, viewed at centre and UK-wide level • Surveys: Learner demographics (online survey) and Impact data (telephone) for progression to learning and employment, use of Government websites, information around confidence and wellbeing. In field 52 weeks a year. • Further impact evaluation: applying volumetrics to economic impact for Government; regular research projects eg social inclusion and digital inclusion, innovative health and digital outcomes
  7. 7. 1. Data
  8. 8. Learner, learning, course data • Learn My Way • Learners: personal planner, bookmarks, progress, badges • Centres: totals and per learner • National/Aggregated data • 135,320 people last 12 months, 12,930 in March • Logins: 141,789 • Favourite courses: 94,961 Online Basics, 66,376 email course • Website visits: 1m
  9. 9. 2. Surveys: online and telephone A monthly online learner survey among registered users of Learn My Way >7000 respondents per year Among those who opt in from the above, a telephone progression survey one month later >1200 interviews per year Measures the learner profile • Including the % of socially excluded learners Customer satisfaction • Including to what extent users felt the service helped them learn about computers/the internet or increased their confidence Evidence of impact and outcomes • Progression into formal / informal learning • Progression into employment • ‘Quality of Life’: impact on skills and behaviour • Access to public services online and average no. of contacts shifted
  10. 10. D2=1 Education level: 1 to 4 GCSEs or O Levels at any grade, Foundation GNVQ, NVQ Level 1 or equivalent Education D2=5 Education level: No qualifications D6=3 Do you: Live in a house rented from the council or housing association HousingD6=5 Do you: Live in sheltered accommodation D6=6 Do you: Have no current home D5=1 Whether receive benefits: Jobseekers Allowance Benefits D5=2 Whether receive benefits: Employment and Support Allowance D5=3 Whether receive benefits: Income Support D5=4 Whether receive benefits: Working Tax Credit D5=5 Whether receive benefits: Housing Benefit D5=6 Whether receive benefits: Carers’ Allowance D5=7 Whether receive benefits: Council Tax Benefit D5=8 Whether receive benefits: Disability Living Allowance D5=9 Whether receive benefits: Pension Credits D5=10 Whether receive benefits: Child Tax Credits D5=11 Whether receive benefits: Other D4=1 Income: Up to £9,999 Income D3=4 Current main activity: Unemployed Unemployed SocialExclusion Definition of Social Exclusion (>7000 surveys)
  11. 11. 80% Socially Excluded
  12. 12. B1_C Searched for jobs Job search & prospects B1_E Written a CV B1_G Applied for jobs B1_I Been for job interviews B1_K Improved job prospects B4_A More interesting work Improvement at work B4_B More job satisfaction B4_C Better job security B4_D Pay & promotion prospects Employment Progression B1_J Started full or part time work Entered employment B1_J Started voluntary work Voluntary work C1_1 Learning towards formal qualification Further LearningC1_2 Learning without formal qualification B1_A Sought/received careers advice Learning Progression Employmentor LearningProgression Impact on employment and learning (>1,200 interviews a year)
  13. 13. ## ## ## ## ## . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## ## . . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## ## . . . . . ## ## ## ## . . . . . . ## ## ## ## . . . . . . ## ## ## ## . . . . . . ## ## ## ## . . . . . . ## ## ## ## . . . . . . ## ## ## . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . ## . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91% 66% 35% 95% Any Positive Outcome: Quality of Life Employment Progression Learning Progression Base: All learners (1,270)
  14. 14. 3. Other Volumetrics, Financial impact, Deep evaluation
  15. 15. Moving people to online public services • No-one’s ‘spark’ to get digital skills is to interact with Government online (except to get a job) • After gaining digital skills via UK online centres (March 2014 data): • 81% visited central/local Government websites • 56% moved at least one (average 3.8) face-to-face or telephone contact to an online contact with Government • Calculation of £232.4m for 1.2m people (2010 – present)
  16. 16. B1_C Searched for jobs Job search & prospects B1_E Written a CV B1_G Applied for jobs B1_I Been for job interviews B1_K Improved job prospects B4_A More interesting work Improvement at work B4_B More job satisfaction B4_C Better job security B4_D Pay & promotion prospects Employment Progression B1_J Started full or part time work Entered employment B1_J Started voluntary work Voluntary work C1_1 Learning towards formal qualification Further LearningC1_2 Learning without formal qualification B1_A Sought/received careers advice Learning Progression Employmentor Learning Progression Impact on employment and learning (>1,200 interviews a year) Survey data leads to measurement of economic impact: (1) Entered employment, (2) Started voluntary work, (3) Further learning, (4) Started a formal qualification
  17. 17. Conclusions
  18. 18. A Leading Digital Nation by 2020 With current efforts there will still be 6.2m people in 2020 without basic online skills. The total investment required to equip 100% of the UK adult population with the Basic Online Skills they need to regularly use the internet for themselves by 2020 is £875 million. We suggest investment might be split equally between Government; the private sector, and the voluntary and community sector. The investment required to ensure a nation with 100% Basic Online Skills will be £292 million for each sector. www.tinderfoundation.org/Nation2020
  19. 19. 6.2 million people left behind in 2020 and we know who they will be
  20. 20. 5% of 16-64s left to reach In 2020 if carry on at pace and impact of present time (in UK)
  21. 21. PEOPLE make good things happen
  22. 22. Thank You helen@tinderfoundation.org @helenmilner on twitter tinderfoundation.org

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