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Evolutionary Stages Key Note

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Slides from my recent talk at the 'Even Mammoths can be Agile'

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Evolutionary Stages Key Note

  1. 1. © 2014 ripplerock
  2. 2. © 2014 ripplerock Helen Meek An experienced Agile Coach & Trainer Helen.Meek@ripple-rock.com @Helen_J_Meek
  3. 3. © 2014 ripplerock
  4. 4. © 2014 ripplerock
  5. 5. © 2014 ripplerock A tool that enables teams to self reflect on where their Agile, development and testing practices are compared to best practice and/or to the companies long term goal.
  6. 6. © 2014 ripplerock Provides the ability for teams to: • Understand best practice & transparency on the road to excellence • To map start point and to track progress through continuous improvement cycles in a visual way • Agree and create an action plan on how improve practices. • Increased cross team visibility and collaboration to facilitate shared learning and best practice.
  7. 7. © 2014 ripplerock
  8. 8. © 2014 ripplerock Stage 1: Foundation Y/N Wt Scor e Stage 2: Improving Y/N Wt Scor e Stage 3: Self-sustaining Y/N Wt Scor e Business interface 10 0 11 0 11 0 Business involvement Nominated business person to prioritise and prepare stories n 5 0 Product Owner works closely with stakeholders, stakeholders review sprint output n 3 0 Business stakeholders attend the Sprint Review in addition to the PO and actively create backlog items n 3 0 PO Availability Product Owner is available during Sprint to answer questions n 3 0 Product Owner is embedded member of Scrum Team i.e. in sporadic sprint ceremonies n 3 0 Product Owner is embedded member of Scrum Team i.e. in every sprint ceremony, actively taking tasks for story development from sprint backlog n 4 0 Story Development Stories, regardless of their granularity are created in advance of the first sprint starting. n 2 0 Product Owner works with the team to get stories to 'ready' prior to sprint collaboratively understanding acceptance criteria, dependencies and priorities n 5 0 The Product Owner is never ‘surprised’ by Story implementation in the Sprint Review because they are actively involved in transitioning the story to software during the sprint n 4 0 Product Ownership 16 0 25 0 13 0 Prioritising There is a list of prioritised requirements provided to the scrum team n 5 0 The Stories have been prioritised by the Product Owner based on a clear ROI from the business case. n 5 0 ...and the scrum team has re-prioritised stories or created spikes based on risk n 2 0 Backlog Structure Project has vision and outline scope n 3 0 The Product Backlog is correctly scoped and regularly maintained (at least weekly) and prioritised n 5 0 The structure of the backlog is aligned to the business case. A vision, release roadmap, story maps, themes and Epics (or similar tools) are used to cluster, organise and communicate the Product Backlog in a coherent manner. n 2 0 Stories Stories are written by a user or business domain expert in the standard story format 'As a <role> I want <functionality> so that <business rationale>. Followed by acceptance criteria n 1 0 Story size is relative to position within the backlog - with small stories at top - and 'epics' lower down. More granularity of stories at the top of the backlog. An include clear acceptance criteria n 5 0 Stories are created in story writing sessions where Product Owners work with users to write high quality stories n 4 0 Release Planning Stakeholders are aware of the benefits of dividing projects into smaller deliverables - including definition of MMF n 3 0 There is a release plan, with MMF and an outline of subsequent releases n 5 0 A release kick-off meeting ensures all aspects are covered, including; architecture, business value, functionality and non-functional requirements. The release planning process includes a retrospective and is improving. n 3 0 Post-Sprint Activities PO attends and contributes to Sprint Review - providing feedback, validation and recognition of work done n 4 0 Sprint Reviews generate regular and useful feedback - stakeholders, other than the PO, sometimes attend n 5 0 PO acknowledges post sprint feedback and always adds new requirements to the product backlog. n 2 0 Sprint Working 34 0 32 0 28 0
  9. 9. © 2014 ripplerock Once we have completed the questionnaire we are able to provide an instant team heat map and a spider diagram to track progress over time. Foundation Improving Self-sustaining Excelling Business interface 10 ## 10 11 # 11 11 # 0 7 ## 0 Product Ownership 16 ## 16 25 # 15 13 # 6 20 ## 0 Sprint Working 34 ## 34 32 # 15 28 # 7 21 ## 4 Team Stuff 22 ## 22 28 # 26 24 # 10 20 ## 1 Planning & Estimating 15 ## 15 13 # 13 19 # 19 11 ## 11 Continuous Improvement 8 ## 8 6 # 3 6 # 3 8 ## 5 Development Practices 19 ## 16 20 # 15 21 # 6 15 ## 2 Testing Practices 28 ## 25 28 # 20 30 # 10 25 ## 5 Continuous delivery 22 ## 22 25 # 18 25 # 10 27 ## 8 Categories Different Levels Met level Partially met level Level not achieved Scores on the left indicate the maximum points available, and the points on the right detail the team score 0 1 2 3 4 Business interface Product Ownership Sprint Working Team Stuff Planning & Estimating Continuous Improvement Development Practices Testing Practices Continuous delivery
  10. 10. © 2014 ripplerock Business interface 10 ## 10 11 # 11 11 # 11 7 ## 4 Product Ownership 16 ## 16 25 # 25 13 # 6 20 ## 3 Sprint Working 34 ## 34 32 # 17 28 # 12 21 ## 4 Team Stuff 25 ## 25 30 # 26 26 # 12 22 ## 3 Planning & Estimating 15 ## 15 13 # 7 19 # 5 11 ## 2 Continuous Improvement 8 ## 8 6 # 0 6 # 0 8 0% 0 Development Practices 19 ## 19 20 # 12 21 # 12 15 ## 8 Testing Practices 28 ## 18 31 # 18 30 # 0 25 0% 0 Continuous delivery 22 ## 15 25 # 4 25 # 0 27 0% 0 Foundation Improving Self-Sustaining Excelling GB Business interface 10 ## 8 11 # 6 11 # 7 7 ## 1 Product Ownership 16 ## 16 25 # 10 13 # 4 20 0% 0 Sprint Working 34 ## 26 32 # 5 28 # 0 21 0% 0 Team Stuff 25 ## 17 30 # 20 26 # 11 22 ## 6 Planning & Estimating 15 ## 9 13 # 0 19 # 0 11 0% 0 Continuous Improvement 8 ## 8 6 # 3 6 # 0 8 0% 0 Development Practices 19 ## 18 20 # 11 21 # 9 15 ## 4 Testing Practices 28 ## 17 31 # 7 30 # 0 25 0% 0 Continuous delivery 22 ## 14 25 # 11 25 # 3 27 0% 0 Foundation Improving Self-Sustaining Excelling LW Business interface 10 ## 10 11 # 6 11 # 7 7 ## 1 Product Ownership 16 ## 16 25 # 15 13 # 2 20 0% 0 Sprint Working 34 ## 34 32 # 2 28 # 0 21 0% 0 Team Stuff 25 ## 25 30 # 11 26 # 6 22 ## 3 Planning & Estimating 15 ## 15 13 # 1 19 # 0 11 0% 0 Continuous Improvement 8 ## 3 6 # 0 6 # 0 8 0% 0 Development Practices 19 ## 16 20 # 5 21 # 3 15 0% 0 Testing Practices 28 ## 18 31 # 7 30 # 0 25 0% 0 Continuous delivery 22 ## 15 25 # 4 25 # 0 27 0% 0 Foundation Improving Self-Sustaining Excelling FU Business interface 10 ## 10 11 # 6 11 # 4 7 0% 0 Product Ownership 16 ## 16 25 # 20 13 # 2 20 0% 0 Sprint Working 34 ## 34 32 # 22 28 # 8 21 ## 4 Team Stuff 25 ## 25 30 # 26 26 # 6 22 ## 3 Planning & Estimating 15 ## 12 13 # 9 19 # 0 11 0% 0 Continuous Improvement 8 ## 8 6 # 3 6 # 0 8 0% 0 Development Practices 19 ## 19 20 # 7 21 # 3 15 ## 3 Testing Practices 24 ## 21 28 # 16 27 # 0 22 0% 0 Continuous delivery 22 ## 22 25 # 14 25 # 16 27 ## 6 Foundation Improving Self-Sustaining Excelling TB PF
  11. 11. © 2014 ripplerock
  12. 12. © 2014 ripplerock
  13. 13. © 2014 ripplerock
  14. 14. © 2014 ripplerock
  15. 15. © 2014 ripplerock • Overall across all of the teams there has been growth of: 48.2%
  16. 16. © 2014 ripplerock Conclusions

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