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Patterns that Connect: Exploring the concept of pattern in the face of growing complexity

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The first part of the talk examines the challenges brought about by the exponential growth of information and dynamic complexity, and the types of responses needed in order to address these challenges from an agency perspective. The second part outlines various functions and possibilities underlying the concept of pattern in the areas of cybernetics, semiotics, cognition, modeling, design and participative inquiry, and examines how they could be operationalized at the service of systemic literacy and collective intelligence.

The video recorded talk is available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ps8ocO6yG68&feature=youtu.be&t=1m52s

There's a paper available here: https://www.academia.edu/27465412/Patterns_that_Connect_Exploring_The_Potential_of_Patterns_and_Pattern_Languages_in_Systemic_Interventions_Towards_Realizing_Sustainable_Futures

Published in: Design

Patterns that Connect: Exploring the concept of pattern in the face of growing complexity

  1. 1. Patterns that Connect Exploring the concept of pattern in the face of growing complexity Helene Finidori ECCO/GBI Seminar – 2 December 2016
  2. 2. We will examine: •  The challenges brought about by complexity and the types of responses needed in order to address these challenges from a systemic and interconnected agency perspective. •  The various mediating and connective functions underlying the concept of pattern and how they could be operationalized at the service of systemic literacy and collective intelligence. My objective •  Gather input for my PhD on the topic •  Orient my research in a way that can benefit the Global Brain Project •  Establish an agenda for future collaborative work Patterns that Connect Exploring the Concept of Pattern in the Face of Growing Complexity Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  3. 3. Helene Finidori – PLoP October 2016 - We live in an increasingly complex world… Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  4. 4. Detail  Complexity  is  growing         Helene Finidori - September 2015 -   Increasing  numbers  of  variables  and  moving  parts  of  different  kinds.   In  any  given  domain,  knowledge  grows  at  a  pace  at  which  it  can’t  be   curated,    integrated    fast  enough     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  5. 5. Dynamic  Complexity  is  growing  and  accelera5ng       Helene Finidori - September 2015 -   Increasing  numbers  of    interac=ons  among  greater  varie=es  of  systemic  processes  and   dynamics  aggrega=ng  at  various  levels  and  scales  that  can’t  be  fully  grasped.   Where  are  the  leverage  points?   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  6. 6. Different  types  of  systems  in  interac5on       Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Yaneer  Bar-­‐Yam  (1997)  hHp://www.necsi.edu/projects/yaneer/EOLSSComplexityRising.pdf   Simple or complex?  Different types of systems with different types of individual and collective behaviors interact Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  7. 7. Determinis5c  System  (mindless)   No-­‐choice  of  parts/  no-­‐choice  of  the  whole   Ecological  System  (hybrid)     Choice  of  parts  /  no  choice  of  the  whole   Social  System  (mul5-­‐minded)     Choice  of  the  part  /  choice  of  the  whole   Animate  System  (uni-­‐minded)     No-­‐choice  of  parts  /  choice  of  the  whole   How  agency  comes  in  the  picture       Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Ackoff  &  Gharajedaghi  (1966/2003)  hHp://www.acasa.upenn.edu/System_MismatchesA.pdf     There  is  a  problem  when  a  system  of  a  certain   type  is  managed  with  a  model  of  another  type   Systems interact with different degrees of agency of their parts or as a whole   How  do  code  and  AI  enter  the  picture?   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  8. 8. Construc5on:  components  are  the  result  of  applied   work  aimed  at  producing  a  given  direct  effect   (determinis=c,  mechanical  system)   A  variety  of  genera5ve  processes  combined   Helene Finidori - September 2015 - source: Bonnitta Roy Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 Development:  the  system  is  transformed  through   the  realiza=on  of  its  poten=als.  Work  is  applied   towards  genera=ng  capacity  /  capability.     Autopoiésis:  the  system  (re)generates  itself  in   interac=on  with  its  environment,  maintaining  its   proper=es  and  con=nuously  regenera=ng  its  own   organiza=on  (ecological,  living  system).   Emergence:  (unexpected)  proper=es  (synergies)   result  from  the  interac=on  between  parts  which  do   not  prefigure  these  proper=es  when    taken   individually  -­‐  ex:  the  wetness  of  H2O  that  can  be   prefigured  neither  in  H  nor  in  O…     Evolu5on:  the  system  transforms  itself  through   adapta=ons  and  evolu=ons  at  different  levels  and   scales  of  diversified  processes  which  interact  with   one  another  (complex  adap=ve  systems,  social   systems)  
  9. 9. The  “system”  or  the  medium  take  control,  influence  et  even  drives  the  actors...     Diversity  and  choice,  and  therefore  the  capacity  to  act  are  reduced  or  biased.           or   or   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Different  types  of  aggregated  effects   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 When  visible  >  AHrac=on  (pull),  accelerated/amplified  by  the  instant  diffusion   –and  manipula=on  (push)?-­‐  of  informa=on           Invisible  to  start  with,  reveal  themselves  with  =me  >  Tipping  points       PaHerns  of  behavior  >  Informa=on  in  the  environment  /  Tracks  in  the  “medium”      
  10. 10.   ▪  Non-­‐linear,  mul=ple  intricate  factors  /  causes  of  different  nature:  physical,   biological,  psycho-­‐cogni=ve  (individual  level)    and  cultural-­‐cogni=ve  (social   system  level)     ▪  Effects  manifest  at  different  levels  and  scales       ▪  At  mul=ple  rhythms  /  paces,     ▪  Structures  and  behaviors  evolve  over  =me,  there  is  no  stable  state       Helene Finidori - September 2015 - “Wicked problems” emerge within complex systems Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  11. 11. Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Consequences for problem solving →  Information, the signals to act upon, are scattered and evolve over time →  No ‘higher order’ from which to look, integrate and plan coherent responses →  No history or best practice to rely upon, to project for higher orders of emergence →  Language and perspectives differ: no shared articulations, priorities or pathways →  No right or wrong: tradeoffs may be involved Complexity   high  interdependence  of   mul5dimensional  factors   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  12. 12. Responses   →  Social systems form around social objects (scientific, political, economic, spiritual etc…). →  As they seek efficiency in resource allocation, their foci of action tend to narrow and domains of specialty tend to increase in number, competing for resources. →  At the same time, knowledge, language and culture become increasingly specialized and differentiated. Agency is distributed and covers an increasingly wide range of variety. →  As a result there is as a whole an increasing number of logics of action and signals of different types to perceive, make sense of and integrate: more objects of focus, more contexts, more content, more knowledge representations, more interpretations →  This competition and differentiation is an impediment to collaboration and trans-disciplinary approach to agency despite increasing efforts to federate diversity and complementarity. Responses   of  mul5ple  nature  -­‐   Agency  distributed   highly  fragmented   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 : local efficiency without global coherence  
  13. 13. Object     of  Focus     &  Ac5on   (What)   Internal   Drivers  &   Reflec5vity   (Why)   External   Rela5ons  &   Expressions   (How)   Agency   Meaning   Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐     Agency:  the  capacity  to  ‘effect’   Its  form:  the  result  of  (co)individua=on  processes   Differences  in  priori=za=on:     epistemological  rather  than  ontological       The triadic form of agency Object directed Socially directed Development directed Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  14. 14. Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐     The  Fable  of  the  Elephant     Cartoon  by  Leunig   (Co)individua=on  processes  shape  representa=on/expression  and  interpreta=on.            To  cut  through,  ‘objec5ve  truth’ & ‘translation’ are not enough Not  ‘just’  a  ques=on  of  language,  and  finding  the  ‘beHer  truth’  or  vantage  point.     A  desire  to  collaborate  across  disciplines  does  not  imply  a  desire  to  unify  these  and  align   visions,  pathways  and  priori=es.  Forms  of  agency  /  ac=on  logics  are  not  interchangeable.   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 Different  ‘objec=ve  truths’  >  challenge  for  mutual  understanding  and  alignment  around  shared   visions  and  pathways.      
  15. 15. Simple  local  rules,  emergence  of  complex  adap5ve  behavior                   Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Coherence  and  convergence:  The  analogy  of  the  swarm   Separa5on:  steer  to  avoid  crowding   local  flockmates   Alignment:  steer  towards  the  average   heading  of  local  flockmates   Cohesion:  steer  to  move  toward  the   average  posi=on  of  local  flockmates     hHp://www.red3d.com/cwr/boids/   This may apply within social systems where internal drivers may align, and external expressions are cohesive by ‘construction’ (because built around a shared social object) Achieving alignment and cohesion across boundaries requires whole sets of new organs to look into other objects, understand and mediate other drivers and expressions, understand how the three components of agency work together. Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  16. 16. Clusters  of  ac=on  cooperate  or  compete  in  the  ac=on  space  with  variable   degrees  of  cohesiveness  and  overlap  on  one  or  several  of  their  triadic  agency   components.  There  may  be  some  convergent  or  coherent  evolu=onary   trajectories  as  a  result.         Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Agency  and  connec5vity   Overlaps,  convergences  and   divergences    are  more  or  less   implicit,  or  are  dealt  with  as  dis=nct   domains  horizontally  or  ver=cally.   As  a  whole,  the  networks  of   phenomena  and  outcomes  that   cons=tute  dynamic  complexity  are   not  matched  by  an  equivalent   degree  of  networked  agency  which   would  enable  us  to  tap  in  the   diversity  and  realize  the  poten=al  it   offers.     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  17. 17. Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Agency  and  connec5vity   Expressions: Social sciences, anthropology; practical knowledge; formal causes; systems of communication At best connectivity exists within domains of science, and between them ‘as a whole’: Objects: Hard natural sciences; working knowledge; efficient causes; systems of causality Drivers: Cognitive sciences, behavioral sciences, developmental psychology; emancipatory knowledge, final causes; systems of inferences The main question is: How can different embodiments of agency be interconnected at various levels of granularity on all their dimensions to produce more coherence and convergence of resources (material, cognitive, relational)? How can we humans make better sense of the world around us, convergences and divergences and potentials for coherence towards sustainable trajectories. Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  18. 18.   ▪  perceive  and  interpret  weak  signals,  tracks   within  the  systems/domains  we  directly   influence  or  control,  and  steer  their  trajectories   through  complex  adap=ve  modeling             Helene Finidori - September 2015 - New  organs  for  systemic  literacy  and  connec5vity   Making  sense  of  systems  and  their  evolu5on  individual  and  collec5ve,  in  space   and  5me.     ? ? ? Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016   ▪  perceive  and  interpret  weak  signals,  tracks  and   trajectories  beyond  our  own,  explore  overlaps   and  gaps  at  boundaries,  to  collaborate,   compete,  or  merely  ‘posi=on’  oneself  in  the   bigger  picture.                   ▪  mediate  percep=ons  and  interpreta=ons,  and   interconnect  knowledge  representa=ons  across   boundaries  to  collec=vely  model  or  design  goal   seeking  trajectories,  and  navigate  a  broader   picture  of  reality.        
  19. 19. PaHerns  are  everywhere,  but  not  explicitely  acknowledged  as  such.   Making  the  func=on  of  paHern  explicit  can  help  see  its  poten=al  as  cue,   concept  and  ar=fact  to  develop  new  sensory  skills  for  understanding,   crea=vity  and  adapta=on  .     Let’s  examine  the  various  func=ons  /  proper=es  of  the  concept  of  paHern   as  unit  for  inference  processing,  media=on  and  connec=vity,  in  the  areas   of:     •  Semio=cs   •  Cyberne=cs   •  Cogni=on   •  Formaliza=on   •  Modeling     •  Design   •  Ac=on  research     Seen  from  the  perspec=ve  of  the  lifecycle  of  ac=on  and  the  triadic  form  of   agency     Helene Finidori - September 2015 - The  unfulfilled  poten5al  of  the  paVern  as  concept     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  20. 20. The  Piercean  triadic  semio=c  sign  is  at  the  same  =me:     ▪  an  object  or  elementary  system  under  focus  (a  phenomenological   ontological  ‘form’,  sta=c  or  dynamic,  in  its  abstractness)     ▪  the  sign-­‐vehicle  that  represents,  signifies  or  ‘encodes’  this  object   in  rela=on  to  its  context  (a  physical  or  explicit  formal   representa=on  such  as  a  symbol  or  ar=fact,  a  design),       ▪  the  interpretant  or  understanding,  inference  and  interpreta=on  of   form,  or  ‘decoding’  of  the  connec=on  between  the  object  and  its   representa=on  (the  form  it  takes  in  the  mind).       Semio5c  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  semio5c  sign     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Source: Charles Pierce Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  21. 21. Semio5c  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  semio5c  sign     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Object   Phenomenological   Ontological   Form   Interpretant   Inference,   Interpreta=on   Understanding     Sign-­‐Vehicle   Expression,   Representa=on,   Track     PaVern   Meaning   This  maps  the  triadic  form  of  agency.   PaHerns  can  be  found  in  each  of  the  sign  ‘categories’.     The  concept  of  paHern  does  not  currently  encompass  all  of  them       Object     of  Focus     &  Ac5on   (What)   Internal   Drivers  &   Reflec5vity   (Why)   External   Rela5ons  &   Expressions   (How)   Agency   Meaning   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  22. 22. The  same  phenomenological  object  can   have  mul=ple  inferences  /  mental   models.     Similar  mental  models  of  an  object  can   have  mul=ple  representa=ons     The  same  representa=on  can  have   mul=ple  interpreta=ons.         These  could  be  connected  in  mul=ple   ways,  forming  networks  of  meaning,   and  media=ng  the  different  forms  of   agency.      Enabling  networks  of  meaning   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Source Soren Brier Semio5c  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  semio5c  sign     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  23. 23. [First  Order]   The  phenomenological  object  –  seen  from  specific  frames  of  reference   and  study   ➔  Pa4erns  can  help  make  domain  related  knowledge  explicit     Cyberne5c  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Cyberne5c  Cue     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Unpacking  Complexity  through  Cyberne5c  orders   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016   [Second  Order]   The  lenses  of  observa=on,  different  ways  to  interpret  and  represent   ➔  Pa4erns  can  help  mediate  and  navigate  meaning  among     frames/domains     [Third  Order]   The  dynamics  and  transforma=ons  resul=ng  from  observa=on  and  ac=on   over  =me,  power  rela=ons:  the  medium  taking  a  life  of  its  own     ➔  Pa4erns  can  help  iden<fy  traces  and  change  in  structure  and  behavior     [Fourth  Order]   The  emergent  outcomes  of  the  previous  orders  in  interac=on,  and  the   changes  in  the  context   ➔  Pa4erns  can  help  reveal  the  mul<ple  processes  of  systems  evolu<on    
  24. 24. Yolles  &  Fink’s  Cyberne5c  Agency  Model   From:  Yolles,  M.  &  Fink,  G.  (2014).    Generic  agency  model,  cyberne=c  orders  and  new  paradigms.   Working  Paper  of  the  Organisa<onal  Coherence  and  Trajectory  (OCT)  Project.  July  2014       Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Cyberne5c  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Cyberne5c  Cue   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  25. 25.   Hofstadter  &  Sanders     ▪  Human  ability  to  make  analogies  lies  at  the  root  of  all   conceptualiza=on  and  capacity  to  selec=vely  evoke  concepts,  from   the  most  basic  in  childhood  language  development  to  the  most   abstract  leading  to  scien=fic  discoveries     Dyson   ▪  Brain  uses  maps  to  process  informa=on  and  navigates  from  one  map   to  the  other       Poincaré   ▪  Analogical  reasoning:  finding  hidden  similari=es  and  revealing  deep   iden=ty  of  structure  among  what  appears  divergent  in  associa=ons   between  seemingly  disparate  concepts  or  ideas  brought  about  by   intui=on  (Paty,  1994)         Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Analogical  func5oning  of  the  brain   Cogni5ve  Func5on/  PaVern  as  Unit  of  recogni5on  of  form  &  inference   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  26. 26. Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐        Margolis’  P-­‐Cogni5on  cycles   P -cognitive spirals: ‘Each spiral represents a cognitive cycle where a pattern prompted by cues in a context, becomes itself part of the context, and cues another pattern. Conscious or not, this cycle is essentially a-logical and can happen in multiple cognitive dimensions at once, such as playing the piano while having a conversation. Only a small fraction of these prompted patterns could be expected to come to conscious attention.’ Source: (Margolis 1987: 2) Cogni5ve  Func5on/  PaVern  as  Unit  of  recogni5on  of  form  &  inference   Pattern as cue Pattern as cue Pattern as cue Pattern in Mind Pattern in Mind Pattern in Mind Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  27. 27. The  Pragma5c  Cycle   Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐     Making  inferences  &  Connec5ng  ‘moments’  of  inference:     Image: Sowa Cogni5ve  Func5on/  PaVern  as  Unit  of  recogni5on  of  form  &  inference   Pierce’s  Pragma5c  Cycle   Different types of patterns are involved at each ‘moment’ of the perception to action cycle, connected through different types of cognitive metaprocesses Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  28. 28. Note how orientation shapes observation, shapes decision, shapes action, and in turn is shaped by the feedback and other phenomena coming into our sensing or observing window. Also note how the entire “loop” (not just orientation) is an ongoing many-sided implicit cross-referencing process of projection, empathy, correlation, and rejection. From “The Essence of Winning and Losing,” John R. Boyd, January 1996. Ini=ally  meant  to  act  and  change  direc=on  faster  than  the  enemy  in  fighter  jet  situa=ons,  is  now  used  at  different  paces   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     The  promp5ng  of  paVerns:  Boyd’s  OODA  Loop   Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  interpreta5on  framework  Cogni5ve  Func5on/  PaVern  as  Unit  of  recogni5on  of  form  &  inference   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  29. 29. The  Ladder  of  Inference  -­‐  Argyris,  Senge   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  inference  framework   Interpreta=on  is  inference  from  a  point  of  view   The formation of the self sealing logic It’s not only about values, beliefs, meaning, assumptions… Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  30. 30. Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  inference  framework   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Informa5on  processing  and  mental  func5ons  -­‐  Jung   (i) INTROVERSION Focus on the inner world of our thoughts, feelings and reflections EXTRAVERSION (e) Focus on the outer world of things, people and events (N) INTUITION Bigger picture approach, hunches, visionary ability     SENSING (S) Step by step detailed approach, concrete data (T) THINKING Stepping back from situation, judging on facts     (P) PERCEIVING Seeking experience, preference for exploration     FEELING (F) Immersion in situation empathetic view JUDGING (J) Seeking order, preference for organization & decision Orientation of energy & attention Perceiving Functions Judging/Decision Functions Attitude to the external world Preferences of how inferences are made and processed … It’s also about how we infer and process data / patterns Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  31. 31. The  cogni=ve  process  through  which  paHerns  change  their  form:     Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  inference  framework   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Three  types  of  reten5ons  -­‐  S5egler  a_er  Husserl   Individua=on  and  co-­‐individua=on  processes  shape  the  3  facets  of  the  paHern   as  semio=c  sign.  From  inferred  cue  in  the  environment,  to  configura=on  of   form  in  the  mind,  to  individual  and  shared  representa=ons.   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016   ▪  Primary  reten5ons:  the  salient  cues  in  the  environment  that   are  perceived  by  the  mind,  consciously  or  not             ▪  Secondary  reten5ons:    the  filters  /  funnel  through  which   primary  reten=ons  are  selected,  made  of  the  aggregate  of  past   primary  reten=ons  (memory,  habits  of  mind)         ▪  Ter5ary  reten5ons:  the  tracks  we  leave  in  the  environment  for   others  to  process  (cultural  ar=facts).      
  32. 32. Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐     Human  thought  as  model  building  ac5vity     (Lake  &  al  -­‐  https://arxiv.org/pdf/1604.00289v3.pdf)   The  human  mind  can  :     ■  Recognize,  decompose  and  recompose  concepts   ■  Make  inferences  using  intui=ve  physics  and  intui=ve  psychology   ■  Construct  causal  models  of  the  world     ■  Learn  in  the  process   PaHerns  learnt  through  experience  are  the  basis  of  understanding  and  learning   which  supports  model  building.   §  Experience  is  gathered  in  the  form  of  previously  encountered  paHerns,  used  to   match  sensory  input  from  a  context,  at  various  levels.   §  The  self-­‐organiza=on  of  matching  paHerns  is  the  understanding  of  a  situa=on   (situa=on  seman=cs  Monica  Anderson)   §  Context  determines  what  paHerns  are  to  be  used,  different  from  reduc=onism.     §  Learning  is  crea=ng  more  paHerns  to  match  new  previously  unseen  sensory   input,  or  make  sense  of  higher  order  complexity.   PaHern  recogni=on  capability  is  an  evolu=onary  driving  force  that  helps  survival   (Monica  Andersen  -­‐  hHp://videos.syn=ence.com/ai-­‐meetups/modelsvspaHerns.html)   Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  inference  framework   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  33. 33. ▪  Building  configura=ons  that  bring   harmony  between  two  intangibles:  forms   not  yet  conceived  and  contexts  that   cannot  be  fully  described    (Alexander).       ▪  Near  decomposability  of  complex   systems  –  graspable  by  the  mind-­‐  &   gramma=za=on  enabling  to  segment  into   smaller  paHerns  and  probe  each   associa=on  (Simon,  Quillien,  Jacobs)     ▪  Purpose-­‐seeking:  constantly  adap=ng   intermediary  goals  to  an  ideal  outcome   (Jones).  Agile  technology  (Cunningham  &   Mehaffy)       ▪  Enabling  context  adap=ve  modeling,  and   networks  of  adap=ve  solu=ons.       Modeling  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Unit  of  systemic  Fitness   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Modeling the complexity of the world similarly as human thought processes? ▪  PaHern  Language  inspired  by  the   process  of  design  of  vernacular   cultures  -­‐their  ‘=meless  way  of   building’,  grounded  in  tacit/implicit   knowledge  (Alexander).         Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  34. 34. •  A  hacker  approach  to  render  configura=ons,  processes,  flows  –  sensory  as   well  as  cogni=ve  approach     ▪  Connect  through  systemic  isomorphies  (Bertalanffy)  and  iden=ty  of   structure  /  analogical  reasoning  (Poincaré)     ▪  Enable  experimental  design  and  post-­‐hoc  data  analysis  for  the   reconstruc=on  of  phenomena  and  mul=dimensional  dynamics  –  reverse   engineering.  Including  of  algorithms.   ▪  Enable  intent  cas=ng,  and  a  pharmacological  approach       ▪  Providing  prac=cal  tools  for  cri=cal/apprecia=ve  hermeneu=cal  approach/ probing  quality,  systemic  trajectories  and  sustainability  (pharmacological   approach).   ▪  Connect  via  the  modeling  rela=on  (Rosen)  –  encoding  /  decoding  the   rela=ons  among  the  three  facets  of  the  semio=c  triad.     Modeling  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Connec5ve  Building  Block   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐    Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  35. 35. Helene  Finidori  -­‐  September  2015  -­‐     Rosen’s  Modeling  Rela5on   A natural system N is modeled by a formal system F. Each system has its own internal entailment structures (arrows 1 and 3), and the two systems are connected by the encoding and decoding processes (arrows 2 and 4). « The encoding and decoding mappings are independent of the formal and natural systems, respectively. In other words, there is no way to arrive at them from within the formal system or natural system.» Andreas Schierwagen. 2011. Reverse Engineering for Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures: A Critical Analysis Cogni5ve  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Mental  filter  &  inference  framework   « The act of modeling is really the act of relating two systems in a subjective way. An ‘art’ says Rosen. » Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  36. 36.   ▪  Visual,  sound,  ar=fact     ▪  Designs:  carvings  –  =les  –  carpets     ▪  Religious  shamanic  symbols  and  rituals     ▪  Templates  or  blueprints:  clothes,  machinery     ▪  Repeatable  processes:  recipe,  produc=on  process     ▪  Recurrent  configura=ons:  maths,  physics,  biology  –  DNA     ▪  Archetypes  (Jung),  Systems  Archetypes       Formal  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Unit  of  representa5on  of  form     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     A  “Standard”,  recognizable,  reproducible,  shareable     >  Cues,  captured  becoming  models?  Units  of  exchange?  Memes?     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  37. 37.   “Each  pa4ern  describes  a  problem  which  occurs  over  and  over  again  in  our   environment,  and  then  describes  the  core  of  the  solu<on  to  that  problem,  in   such  a  way  that  you  can  use  this  solu<on  a  million  <mes  over,  without  ever   doing  it  the  same  way  twice.”  A Pattern Language, Alexander (1977, p X)       Distributed  nature  of  the  paVern  as  rich  versa5le  knowledge  objects.   Structured  objects,  connectable  into  PaVern  Languages…     ▪  Has  an  internal  reproducible  structure  (Alexander)     ▪  Could  become  a  standard,  with  interoperable  features  (wiki)     ▪  Connectable  via  hyperlink  or  other  ‘seman=c  web’  technologies   to  cross  over  different  dimensions  of  complexity   à  What  forms  of  standard interoperable vehicles and what protocols to connect them? To embedded the pattern in all its facets into other digital or non digital tools?       Formal  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  connectable  Unit  of  knowledge   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐    Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  38. 38. Formal  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  connectable  Unit  of  knowledge   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     The Alexandrian Pattern structure Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  39. 39.   In  par5cipatory  ac5on  research  and  hermeneu5cal  inquiry     ▪  Using  a  shared  representa=on  format  to  explore,  compare  and   confront  percep=ons,  representa=ons  and  interpreta=ons   around  shared  objects  of  study.  Using  simple  ar=facts  to   ‘construct’  together.     ▪  Keep  track  of  controversies  and  their  evolu=ons  (wikipedia)     ▪  Explore  boundaries,  differences,  similari=es,  what  lies  in  between   à  Learning  paHern  thinking  and  to  ‘speak  the  language  of  paHerns’             Methodological  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Boundary  object     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐    Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  40. 40. The  Johari  Window   Joint  discovery  of  blind  spots  and  the  unknown   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Methodological  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Boundary  object     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  41. 41.     ▪  Learning  to  find  ‘paHerns  that  connect’  across  dimensions  and   boundaries     ▪  To  connect  and  navigate  the  spa=al  and  temporal  dimensions  of   complexity  and  change     ▪  To  navigate  the  ‘adjacent  possible’  for  joint  discovery  and  co-­‐ evolu=on     Methodological  Func5on  /  PaVern  as  Media5ng  &  connec5ve  object   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     At the end of the day, it is about… Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  42. 42. How  to  expand  and  opera=onalize  the  concept  of  paHern   that  connect  to  encompass  the  whole  percep=on-­‐to-­‐ac=on   cycle  and  unpack  the  different  dimensions  of  complexity?               Helene Finidori - September 2015 - The  broader  research  ques5on   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  43. 43. Helene Finidori - September 2015 - Opera5onalizing  PaVerns  that  Connect   Some  Orienta5ons     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  44. 44. Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐          Opera5onalizing  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Visual tools / artifacts - to play, construct, deconstruct, probe A Systemic Connective Language - the units to be combined Collaborative sketching and annotation Semantic capability - the various ways to associate patterns Formats and protocols for interoperability of patterns AI deep learning systems to infer / suggest / simulate / play Visual tools to navigate data and knowledge (anoptical, holoptical) Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  45. 45. Visual  Construc5on  Tools:  Card  Games  -­‐  Groupworks   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     A Pattern Language for bringing life to meetings and gatherings Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 http://groupworksdeck.org/
  46. 46. Visual  Construc5on  Tools:  Tangible  tokens  -­‐  S.  Huron  Inria   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Investigating how people construct visual mappings •  Create •  Update •  Annotate Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016 http://constructive.gforge.inria.fr/#!index.md
  47. 47. Visual  Construc5on  Tools:  Lego  Serious  Play  ©   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Lego 3D models used a shared language for group discussion, knowledge sharing, problem solving and decision making •  Based on creative imaginations & metaphor •  Learning to ‘think with one’s hands’ Source: Avea partners Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  48. 48.  Seeing  the  big  picture  emerge:  The  Poie5c  Generator  -­‐  O.  Auber   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Each player draws on a small part of a global mosaic that each can see evolve as they draw By OlivierAuber - Own work, FAL, http://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php? curid=19849563 Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  49. 49. Seeing  the  picture  emerge:  Real  5me  coding  feedback  –B.  Victor   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     The image moves as the code variables are changed https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8F7tzc1Tco Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  50. 50. Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Bertalanffy:  Approaching  the  Unity  of  Science     There  are  correspondences  in  the  principles  that  govern  the  behaviour  of  en<<es   that  are,  intrinsically,  widely  different.  Isomorphisms:  structural  similari<es  exis<ng   in  different  fields.  (p.33)     More  than  mere  analogy.  It  is  a  consequence  of  the  fact  that,  in  certain  respects,   corresponding  abstrac<ons  and  conceptual  models  can  be  applied  to  different   phenomena.  (p.36)     …  general  system  laws  [exist]  which  apply  to  any  system  of  a  certain  type,   irrespec<ve  of  the  par<cular  proper<es  of  the  system  and  of  the  elements  involved.   (p.37)     …  major  aims  of  General  System  Theory…  developing  unifying  principles  running   'ver<cally'  through  the  universe  of  the  individual  sciences,  this  theory  brings  us   nearer  to  the  goal  of  the  unity  of  science.  (p.38)                Bertalanffy,  L.,  1968   “ “ ” Unifying  Principles,  Isomorphy  &  Systemic  Connec5ve  Language   Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  51. 51. Scien=sts  have  been  on  a  quest  for  ‘universal  paHerns’  for    while.       Can  this  be  done?     Are  other  other  ways  to  ‘tend’  towards  that  without  defining  it?     For  example  through:     Clusters  of  isomorphic  /  homomorphic  ‘semio=cally’  interconnected   forms?  With  discussions  on  dis=nc=ons  and  similari=es?     Isomorphic  /  homomorphic  ideograms  used  to  tell  systemic  stories,   diagram  paHerns,  and  ‘tag’  contexts  or  situa=ons?     Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐              From  universal  paVerns  to  clusters  of  iso/homomorphic  paVerns?         Unifying  Principles,  Isomorphy  &  Systemic  Connec5ve  Language   Opera5onalizing  the  PaVerns  that  Connect  –  some  orienta5ons     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  52. 52. Level of scale Strong Center Boundaries Alternating repetition Positive Space (complementarity) Good Shape (adaptation) Local Symmetry            Alexander’s  15  Fundamental  proper5es   AlexanderBy TKWA Iba Leitner Deep Interlock & Ambiguity Contrast (difference) Gradients Roughness (individuality) Echoes (similarities) The Void (open space) Simplicity & Inner Calm Not Separatedness (connectedness) Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  53. 53. 1. BOOTSTRAP 4. ATTRACTION 10. ACCOMPANY 7. BUILDING UP 19. AIMING 13. SELECTION 22. DIFFERENTIATING 16. ROUGHNESS 17. FLEXIBILITY 23. OVERLAPPING 14. SIMPLIFICATION 20. CONNECTING 12. EMPATHY 9. REFLECTING 3. SPREADING 6. TOGETHERNESS 2. SOURCE 5. INVOLVING 11. ENHANCING 8. GROWTH 24. CONTINUATION 15. CONSISTENCY 21. POSITIONING 18. ABUNDANCE  Iba  Lab’s  24  Fundamental  Behavioral  Proper5es     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  54. 54. Systemic  Interpreta5on   Grammar   (Elementary  Components)           Dynamics   (Movement)     ◆        Sta5cs   (Space  -­‐  Structure)     ◆        Heuris5cs   (Inflexions  –  Limits  –    Angles  –  Switches)     Systemic  PaHerns   Generic      Domain  Related   Contexts     PaHern  Languages   Domain  Related       Genera=ve  processes  -­‐  Nature  of  movement  –  Direc=on  –  Rhythm     –  Effect  of  =me  &  scale  etc…     Func=on  -­‐  Rela=onships  –  Proximity  –  Mutuality  –  Boundary  -­‐  Posi=on  –  feedback  etc…     Logics  of  Change  -­‐  Cogni=ve  Processes  (Jung)  –  Learning  Styles  –  Process  Narra=ves  (Roy)    –  Inference  (What/what/how,  Aristotelian  ethics)  –  Pharmakon/window  of  viability     (S=egler,  Lietaer)  –  One  level  up/down  –  etc…  -­‐  Switches  (DNA)   Systemic  operators  -­‐  Variables  –  Principles  for  combina=on  –  etc…     A  Systemic  Interpreta5on  Language   Bridging  the  Systemic  &  the  Seman5c  Spheres   Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  55. 55. Cards  used  to  tell  ‘systemic  stories’  at  Purplsoc  2015   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐    Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  56. 56. Cards  used  to  tell  ‘systemic  stories’  at  Plop  2016   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Find pictures Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  57. 57.  PaVern  Dynamics  consul5ng  prac5ce  
  58. 58. 1.  A series of stages or layers 2.  Series showing changes in magnitude 3.  Circle showing separation in divisions 4.  Pyramid showing parts to wholes, subunits to units 5.  Outline showing subheadings at several levels 6.  Circles showing clustering and inclusion 7.  Series showing subsumption ⬜  Icons represent the essence of an idea in abstract; simplify (all-at-once) ALL SHOW COMMON ID FEATURES OF LEVELS,GAPS, CLUSTERING, HETEROGENEOUS SEPARATION, ETC.  Systems  Sciences:  Len  Truncale  -­‐  Icons  for  Hierarchy  
  59. 59. ✓  From “cyclus” (Gr.) = circle, wheel. Some key features are: ✓  Stages of a cycle •  Steps in a process •  A cycle may seem like a smooth transition; not; very specific intermediates ✓  Obligate sequence •  Transformation of one stage into next •  Next stage requires previous stage ✓  Return to beginning •  Oscillations ✓  SO NEED TO KNOW THE SEQUENCE & STAGE NAMES ICONS for Identifying Features of Cycles and Cycling  Systems  Sciences:  Len  Truncale  –  Features  of  Cycles  I  
  60. 60. •  Importance of Initiating Conditions •  Steps in a process •  A cycle may seem like a smooth transition; not; very specific intermediates •  Control of Stages •  When one starts; when one ends •  Source of embedding cycles in net context for a function •  Entrainment (all cycle) •  Periodicity •  Spin /or/ Rotation /or/ angular momentum ICONS for Cycles and Cycling  Systems  Sciences:  Len  Truncale  –  Features  of  Cycles  II    
  61. 61.                  Adapted  from  the  12  principles  of  Mo5on  Design-­‐  Olie  Johnson  &  Frank  Thomas  
  62. 62. Ques=ons  on  the  theory  and  objec=ve?     Points  of  intersec=on  with  your  own  experience  or  objec=ve?   How  does  this  connect  to  the  GBI  approach?       Other  points  of  view  to  explore?  Research,  angles  or  people  to  discover   for  my  PhD?       Other  possibili=es  for  opera=onaliza=on?  How  can  soxware  and  ar=ficial   intelligence  be  put  at  the  service  of  paHern  languages  and  collec=ve   intelligence?     Discussion.     Ques5on  for  discussion   Helene  Finidori  –  PLoP  October  2016  -­‐     Back  to  the  big  picture     Helene Finidori – ECCO Seminar - December 2016
  63. 63. If you would like to join me in my PhD explorations: @HeleneFinidori Thank You!

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