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HCD Research, Inc. Leaders in Advanced Communications Research
Who is HCD Research? <ul><li>Established in 1991; Located in Flemington, New Jersey </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Research...
HCD in the News Health December 8, 2006  — Many docs oppose trans fat ban: survey  May 25, 2005   — Bush renews threat to ...
<ul><li>Carl Bialik </li></ul><ul><li>THE NUMBERS GUY </li></ul><ul><li>The Wall Street Journal </li></ul>
Core Services <ul><li>Quantitative Internet Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Message Development and Testing </li></ul></ul>...
Eye-Tracking
Eye-Tracking: History and Theory <ul><li>Most Visual Information Captured by the Fovea </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Center of the...
Eye-Tracking: History and Theory <ul><li>Fixations  of  200-300ms Required to Process Information </li></ul><ul><li>World ...
Eye-Tracking: History and Theory 1870’s: Scientific Study of Eye Movement Began 1900’s: Photography Improvements – Non-inv...
Eye-Tracking Technology <ul><li>Originally Designed for Special Needs Populations  </li></ul><ul><li>Sensors / Cameras Emb...
Improving the Effectiveness of Print Ad Concepts Using Eye-Tracking Technology
Original Image for Magic Face
Gaze Plot This gaze plot shows the order of gaze fixations for 7 participants.  Each “bubble” is at least 250 milli-second...
Hot Spots Across All 21 Participants Across all participants, the visible areas in this ad reflect the areas that were loo...
Eye-Tracking Results: Average Gaze Time --  Average Gaze Time (in ms) for Ad Components  -- Base:  All respondents Eye-gaz...
Eye-Tracking Results: Time Until First Fixation --  Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components  -- Base:  All resp...
Recommendations Made to Improve Communication of the Brand Name “Magic Face” Improving the retention of a particular part ...
Revised Image for Magic Face
Gaze Plot  (Revised Image) This gaze plot shows the order of gaze fixations for 7 participants.  Each “bubble” is at least...
Hot Spots  (Revised Image) Across All 21 Participants Across all participants, the visible areas in this ad reflect the ar...
Eye-Tracking Results:  Average Gaze Time   (Revised Image) --  Average Gaze Time (in ms) for Ad Components  -- Base:  All ...
Eye-Tracking Results:  Time Until First Fixation   (Revised Image) --  Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components ...
--  Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components  -- Base:  All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second vie...
Base:  All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing.  Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at lea...
Qualitative Web Site Testing  & Eye-Tracking
Gaze Plot – Disney Website
Hot Spots:  Length of Gaze Fixations Across All Participants
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Eye-tracking presentation

This presentation is based on a poster presentation presented at the 2008 PBIRG conference in Washington, D.C.
It demonstrates how we used only eye-gaze information to improve critical metrics in ad that are related to later recall. Once the most important element within an ad is determined, we measure 2 critical metrics; \"time to first fixation\" and \"total gaze duration\".

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Eye-tracking presentation

  1. 1. HCD Research, Inc. Leaders in Advanced Communications Research
  2. 2. Who is HCD Research? <ul><li>Established in 1991; Located in Flemington, New Jersey </li></ul><ul><li>Qualitative Research – Traditional and Internet Based Methodologies </li></ul><ul><li>Quantitative Research – Use of Internet to Collect Data Since 1996 </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on Communications Research </li></ul>
  3. 3. HCD in the News Health December 8, 2006 — Many docs oppose trans fat ban: survey May 25, 2005  — Bush renews threat to veto stem cell bill October 26, 2006 — The Michael J. Fox Effect October 26, 2006 — Actor Fox sparks debate, support for stem cells March 6, 2005 — Most Doctors Back Assisted Suicide April 19, 2007 — So Long, Sanjaya
  4. 4. <ul><li>Carl Bialik </li></ul><ul><li>THE NUMBERS GUY </li></ul><ul><li>The Wall Street Journal </li></ul>
  5. 5. Core Services <ul><li>Quantitative Internet Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Message Development and Testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Campaign Concept Testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Journal Ad and Sales Aid Testing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Post-Launch Tracking and Effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sales Force Effectiveness/Message Recall </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New Product/Market Assessment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Market Segmentation/Patient Profiling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Awareness/Trial/Usage Studies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other Custom Research </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Web-Based Qualitative Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tele-Web Discussion Groups </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Web-Assisted One-on-One Interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Traditional Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Face-to-Face Interviews </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Check Studies </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Eye-Tracking
  7. 7. Eye-Tracking: History and Theory <ul><li>Most Visual Information Captured by the Fovea </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Center of the Macula </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest Level of Visual Acuity </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Eye-Tracking: History and Theory <ul><li>Fixations of 200-300ms Required to Process Information </li></ul><ul><li>World Perceived Through Series of Successive Fixations </li></ul><ul><li>Technology Must Determine Location of Eye Fixations </li></ul>
  9. 9. Eye-Tracking: History and Theory 1870’s: Scientific Study of Eye Movement Began 1900’s: Photography Improvements – Non-invasive Techniques 1940’s: Head-Mounted Eye-Trackers First Developed 1970’s: High Speed Data Processing & Cognitive Science 1980’s: Human - Computer Interaction Developed 1990’s: Commercial Applications Made Practical
  10. 10. Eye-Tracking Technology <ul><li>Originally Designed for Special Needs Populations </li></ul><ul><li>Sensors / Cameras Embedded In Flat Panel Monitor </li></ul>
  11. 11. Improving the Effectiveness of Print Ad Concepts Using Eye-Tracking Technology
  12. 12. Original Image for Magic Face
  13. 13. Gaze Plot This gaze plot shows the order of gaze fixations for 7 participants. Each “bubble” is at least 250 milli-seconds, and the size of the bubble reflects the length of the fixation.
  14. 14. Hot Spots Across All 21 Participants Across all participants, the visible areas in this ad reflect the areas that were looked at the longest.
  15. 15. Eye-Tracking Results: Average Gaze Time -- Average Gaze Time (in ms) for Ad Components -- Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 The ad concept was broken into 4 components, “Face and body”, “Headline”, “Tagline”, and “Product Image”. The average cumulative fixation length was then calculated for these areas.
  16. 16. Eye-Tracking Results: Time Until First Fixation -- Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components -- Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 Because most people spend only 3 or 4 seconds on an ad before turning the page, it is critical to communicate your “main message” quickly. For this ad, the goal was to quickly communicate the brand name “Magic Face”. Therefore, the time it takes for people to look at the brand name is an important metric.
  17. 17. Recommendations Made to Improve Communication of the Brand Name “Magic Face” Improving the retention of a particular part element within an ad is deceptively simple… you want to place your “main message” close to where people are naturally looking. It’s part science, and part creative collaboration with the creative/design team. Through extensive research, we have shown that the longer an element is looked at, the more likely it is to be remembered. Generally, we need to look at something for at least 250 milliseconds before we begin to cognitively process that we saw something. With this understanding, we can make improvements to the layout of ads/web-pages by assessing, in our example, how long people are looking at the brand name (the longer the better) and how long it takes for people to first look at the brand name (the less time the better). Changes were made to the ad to improve the performance of both attributes.
  18. 18. Revised Image for Magic Face
  19. 19. Gaze Plot (Revised Image) This gaze plot shows the order of gaze fixations for 7 participants. Each “bubble” is at least 250 milli-seconds, and the size of the bubble reflects the length of the fixation.
  20. 20. Hot Spots (Revised Image) Across All 21 Participants Across all participants, the visible areas in this ad reflect the areas that were looked at the longest.
  21. 21. Eye-Tracking Results: Average Gaze Time (Revised Image) -- Average Gaze Time (in ms) for Ad Components -- Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 The ad concept was broken into 4 components, “Face and body”, “Headline”, “Tagline”, and “Product Image”. The average cumulative fixation length was then calculated for these areas.
  22. 22. Eye-Tracking Results: Time Until First Fixation (Revised Image) -- Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components -- Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 Because most people spend only 3 or 4 seconds on an ad before turning the page, it is critical to communicate your “main message” quickly. For this ad, the goal was to quickly communicate the brand name “Magic Face”. Therefore, the time it takes for people to look at the brand name is an important metric.
  23. 23. -- Time Until Fixation (in seconds) for Ad Components -- Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 Comparison of “Pre” and “Post” Ads : Time Until Fixation Decrease in Time to Fixation (-1.28 seconds)
  24. 24. Base: All respondents Eye-gaze information from a 6 second viewing. Gaze points were defined as fixations lasting at least 250 ms. n = 21 Comparison of “Pre” and “Post” Ads : Average Gaze Time -- Average Gaze Time (in milli-seconds) for Ad Components -- Increase in Gaze Time (+282 milliseconds)
  25. 25. Qualitative Web Site Testing & Eye-Tracking
  26. 26. Gaze Plot – Disney Website
  27. 27. Hot Spots: Length of Gaze Fixations Across All Participants
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This presentation is based on a poster presentation presented at the 2008 PBIRG conference in Washington, D.C. It demonstrates how we used only eye-gaze information to improve critical metrics in ad that are related to later recall. Once the most important element within an ad is determined, we measure 2 critical metrics; \"time to first fixation\" and \"total gaze duration\".

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