Narrative Theory:

     Revising key terms and
introducing Propp and Todorov.
Narrative Theory

 What is it?
 The idea that people approach their
  social world using story-like
  frameworks.
 Peop...
Narrative Theory: rational
        world paradigm.
 People are rational
 Being rational is determined by how
  much we k...
Narrative Theory: narrative
             paradigm.
 People are storytellers.
 People make decisions based on good
  reas...
Narrative Theory: narrative
            rationality.
   All communication can be looked at like a
    narrative – through...
Narrative Theory: narrative
            rationality.
   Rationality consists of two factors: coherence
    and fidelity. ...
Chomsky, Propp and Todorov.
   Chomsky argues that narrative is a
    fundamental aspect of human existence.
   Why?
  ...
Classical Narrative

 Has events organised on a logical ‘cause
  and effect’ basis.
 A fictional world which is believab...
Todorov

 Believed that a fictional world has an
  ‘initial equilibrium’ which is disrupted to
  produce a ‘new equilibri...
How does this link to moving
       image texts?
 EDITING: Classical Editing – credible
  fictional space.
 Bridge tempo...
How does this link to moving
       image texts?

 How does classical narrative work in
  self-contained stories within e...
Roland Barthes.

 Describes five narrative codes:
 SEMIC: describes characters.
 REFERENTIAL: refers to the ‘real world...
Roland Barthes.

 PROIARETIC: referes to narrative
  development through ‘action’.
 HERMANEUTIC: proposes ‘enigmas’
  wh...
Classical Narrative.
   Endemic in Western society.
   Narrative transivity
   Identification
   Transparency
   Sing...
Counter-Cinema.

 Narrative intransivity
 Estrangement
 Foregrounding
 Multiple diegesis
 Aperture
 Un-pleasure
 Re...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Narrative Theory

4,544 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,544
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
41
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
78
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Narrative Theory

  1. 1. Narrative Theory: Revising key terms and introducing Propp and Todorov.
  2. 2. Narrative Theory  What is it?  The idea that people approach their social world using story-like frameworks.  People act and make decisions within a narrative framework.
  3. 3. Narrative Theory: rational world paradigm.  People are rational  Being rational is determined by how much we know.  The world is a set of logical puzzles to be solved.
  4. 4. Narrative Theory: narrative paradigm.  People are storytellers.  People make decisions based on good reasons.  We decide what these ‘good reasons’ are based on character, culture and history.  The world is a set of stories we re- create to make up our lives.
  5. 5. Narrative Theory: narrative rationality.  All communication can be looked at like a narrative – through a ‘narrative lens’  Individuals are able to distinguish what makes a story legitimate by using ‘narrative rationality’  Rationality consists of two factors: coherence and fidelity. Coherence can be best defined as if a story makes sense structurally.
  6. 6. Narrative Theory: narrative rationality.  Rationality consists of two factors: coherence and fidelity. Coherence can be best defined as if a story makes sense structurally.  Is the story consistent, with sufficient detail, reliable characters, and free of any major surprises?  Narrative fidelity is concerned with whether or not the story is true.
  7. 7. Chomsky, Propp and Todorov.  Chomsky argues that narrative is a fundamental aspect of human existence.  Why?  Vladimir Propp published ‘Morphology of Folktale’ 1968.  He studied the Russian fairytale and isolated 31 functions(actions or events)…(see sheet)  He also described seven roles…(see sheet)
  8. 8. Classical Narrative  Has events organised on a logical ‘cause and effect’ basis.  A fictional world which is believable.  Narrative economy.
  9. 9. Todorov  Believed that a fictional world has an ‘initial equilibrium’ which is disrupted to produce a ‘new equilibrium.’  Thesis  Disruption  Antithesis  Synthesis
  10. 10. How does this link to moving image texts?  EDITING: Classical Editing – credible fictional space.  Bridge temporal and spatial ellipses.  180 degree rule and invisibility.  CAMERA: How is stable fictional space created?
  11. 11. How does this link to moving image texts?  How does classical narrative work in self-contained stories within episodes?  What must happen at the end of each episode?
  12. 12. Roland Barthes.  Describes five narrative codes:  SEMIC: describes characters.  REFERENTIAL: refers to the ‘real world.’  SYMBOLIC: metaphoric allowing audience to generalise.
  13. 13. Roland Barthes.  PROIARETIC: referes to narrative development through ‘action’.  HERMANEUTIC: proposes ‘enigmas’ which the narrative must solve.
  14. 14. Classical Narrative.  Endemic in Western society.  Narrative transivity  Identification  Transparency  Single diegesis  Closure  Pleasure  Fiction
  15. 15. Counter-Cinema.  Narrative intransivity  Estrangement  Foregrounding  Multiple diegesis  Aperture  Un-pleasure  Reality

×