Perl

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Perl

  1. 1. The Composing Processes of Unskilled College Writers Sondra Perl
  2. 2. What’s the problem? <ul><li>“ All men can’t be consider equal in a America base on financial situation. Because there are men born in rich families that will never have to worry about any financial difficulties. And then theyre are another type of Americans that is born to a poor family and alway may have some kind of fina--difficulty.” </li></ul><ul><li>If this were your student’s writing, what would you think? </li></ul>
  3. 3. What is Perl’s exigence? <ul><li>Territory: studies of composing processes </li></ul><ul><li>Niche: no one has studied unskilled writers; no one has created a “meaningful and replicable method” (236) for studying composing processes </li></ul><ul><li>Occupying niche: study of unskilled writers; The Code </li></ul>
  4. 4. Methodology <ul><li>Five students </li></ul><ul><li>Five 90-minute sessions </li></ul><ul><li>Think-aloud protocol </li></ul><ul><li>Coding </li></ul>
  5. 5. Transcript <ul><li>Okay. So I’m looking at it and I have three sort of sections, or maybe four, that I need to look at. I have the introduction to Mulvey, which is basically—I don’t need to do anything with it, but it’s there. Um, [typing] and then I have p e ople reacting to Mulvey, and so m a ybe I’ll start looking at this. I need to sort of organize it by categories. So, I’m looking at the people that I have: I have Cherry , K e rn , M u lvey’s response to herself, Patricia Johnson… I probably need to go back and look a t.. .Oh, here’s L o sano, which is a transition into the female artist stuff. I probably need to go back and [sigh] look for more … p e ople doing film stuff who are reacting to Mulvey, but… o k ay. So I need to summarize [sigh] t hat p e ople are saying about Mulvey. Um …O k ay, so my last sentence when I was talking about Mulvey is: Doubly marginalized as both woman and artist, doubly blessed with both the ability to observe others and the ability to see herself as the object of others’ gaze, the character of Avis ruptures essentialist assumptions about vision, and confronts the reader with our own r ole as both subject and object of the gaze. Okay, so I need a transition between talking about how Mulvey applies to Avis, to what …. . mhm…. how people .. . are reacting to Mulvey, so I’m arguing that people a r e having problems with Mul—er, no, I’m identifying a problem with Mulvey’s thesis—this is hard, to talk out loud. Um…I ’m losing my train of thought. Okay. So people say…I’m saying that, um, I am complicating Mulvey’s thesis, so I need a transition into other people complicating Mulvey’s thesis, so, um …[ typing]… [sigh]… Cherry… s hoot, it’s in bold [typing].. . Cherry recognizes the import of Mulvey’s analysis in initiating a dialogue… conversation… because it’s more than one person, it’s not just a dialogue. I n itiating a conversation about … female spectatorship? Or, alternatively, gendered vision. Um. [reading unintelligibly from Cherry quote] W hereas Mulvey’s essay has become a catalyst in [unintelligible] a more urgent interrogation of the feminine spectator so I should probably not use f e male spectatorship, because that’s the language that Cherry actually uses. So, gendered vision it is. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Code (very simplified) <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Writing </li></ul><ul><li>Reading </li></ul><ul><li>Editing </li></ul><ul><li>Talking </li></ul>
  7. 7. Coded Transcript <ul><li>Okay. So I’m looking at it and I have three sort of sections, or maybe four, that I need to look at. I have the introduction to Mulvey, which is basically—I don’t need to do anything with it, but it’s there. Um , [typing ] and then I have p e ople reacting to Mulvey, and so m a ybe I’ll start looking at this. I need to sort of organize it by categories. So, I’m looking at the people that I have: I have Cherry , K e rn , M u lvey’s response to herself, Patricia Johnson… I probably need to go back and look a t.. .Oh, here’s L o sano , which is a transition into the female artist stuff. I probably need to go back and [sigh] look for more … p e ople doing film stuff who are reacting to Mulvey, but … o k ay . So I need to summarize [sigh] w hat p e ople are saying about Mulvey . Um …O k ay , so my last sentence when I was talking about Mulvey is: Doubly marginalized as both woman and artist, doubly blessed with both the ability to observe others and the ability to see herself as the object of others’ gaze, the character of Avis ruptures essentialist assumptions about vision, and confronts the reader with our own r ole as both subject and object of the gaze. Okay, so I need a transition between talking about how Mulvey applies to Avis, to what …. . mhm…. how people .. . are reacting to Mulvey, so I’m arguing that people a r e having problems with Mul—er , no, I’m identifying a problem with Mulvey’s thesis— this is hard, to talk out loud. Um…I ’m losing my train of thought. Okay. So people say…I’m saying that, um, I am complicating Mulvey’s thesis, so I need a transition into other people complicating Mulvey’s thesis, so, um … [ typing] … [sigh]… Cherry… s hoot, it’s in bold [typing].. . Cherry recognizes the import of Mulvey’s analysis in initiating a dialogue… conversation… because it’s more than one person, it’s not just a dialogue. I n itiating a conversation about … female spectatorship? Or, alternatively, gendered vision. Um. [reading unintelligibly from Cherry quote] W hereas Mulvey’s essay has become a catalyst in [unintelligible] a more urgent interrogation of the feminine spectator… so I should probably not use f e male spectatorship, because that’s the language that Cherry actually uses. So, gendered vision it is. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Composing Style Sheet <ul><li>P-T-W-P-R-P-T-P-T-R P-E-T-P-W-T-W-E-W E-W-P-R-E </li></ul>
  9. 9. Now you try it. <ul><li>Get into groups of three (approximately). </li></ul><ul><li>Choose a writer, an observer, and a coder. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Writer: Write about your typical writing habits and processes. Try to say all your thoughts out loud. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Observer: Look for patterns. When does the writer get stuck? How often do they get distracted? How much do they write before stopping to think? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coder: Use the simple code to create a style sheet for the writer. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>P=planning </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>W=writing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>E=editing </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>U=unrelated activity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Discuss your results. What did you notice? </li></ul><ul><li>Switch roles, and repeat. </li></ul>
  10. 10. What are your composing behaviors?
  11. 11. What’s wrong with Tony? <ul><li>Recursive </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate rules </li></ul><ul><li>Miscues </li></ul><ul><li>Form over content </li></ul>
  12. 12. What did Perl learn about unskilled college writers? <ul><li>In four groups, prepare a summary of Perl’s findings to present to the class, and discuss how these findings can be useful for us: </li></ul><ul><li>Prewriting (205) </li></ul><ul><li>Writing (207) </li></ul><ul><li>Editing (208) </li></ul><ul><li>Implications (210) </li></ul>

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