Carol Berkenkotter,  “Decisions and Revisions of a Publishing Writer” Donald Murray ,  “Response of a Laboratory Rat”
Write <ul><li>Explain the concept of death to the 10-12 year-old-readers of  Jack and Jill  magazine. You have five minute...
Reflection <ul><li>When Murray was asked to respond to the prompt, “explain the concept of death to the 10-12 year-old-rea...
Research as conversation <ul><li>What is Berkenkotter adding to the conversation? </li></ul><ul><li>What would she say (or...
Perception vs. reality <ul><li>What did Berkenkotter learn through the research process? What surprised her? </li></ul><ul...
Perception vs. reality cont’d <ul><li>What did Murray learn about himself? What surprised him? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Time ...
Sharing my processes <ul><li>Murray writes that “we have an ethical obligation to write and to reveal our writing to our s...
Never have I ever… <ul><li>Never have I ever… </li></ul><ul><li>Like Murray, I… </li></ul><ul><li>Like Tony, I… </li></ul>...
Evolution of a title <ul><li>The Objectified Subject: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s  The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>The  ...
Why is the title so important to Murray? <ul><li>Think about your title for your unit 1 paper. Would you revise it now, af...
Genre <ul><li>Murray writes, “I suspect that when we begin to write in a new genre we have to do a great deal of revision,...
What can you learn from Murray?
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Berkenkotter Murray

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Berkenkotter Murray

  1. 1. Carol Berkenkotter, “Decisions and Revisions of a Publishing Writer” Donald Murray , “Response of a Laboratory Rat”
  2. 2. Write <ul><li>Explain the concept of death to the 10-12 year-old-readers of Jack and Jill magazine. You have five minutes. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Reflection <ul><li>When Murray was asked to respond to the prompt, “explain the concept of death to the 10-12 year-old-readers of Jack and Jill magazine,” he froze up. Compare your experiences responding to the same prompt with his. Why do you think he had such a hard time writing? Did you have a hard time as well? Why or why not? </li></ul>
  4. 4. Research as conversation <ul><li>What is Berkenkotter adding to the conversation? </li></ul><ul><li>What would she say (or does she say) in response to Perl? </li></ul><ul><li>What can you add to the conversation? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Perception vs. reality <ul><li>What did Berkenkotter learn through the research process? What surprised her? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Degree of audience awareness throughout entire composing process (270) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Planning (process goals/rhetorical goals) (264-65) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Revision (“reconceiving,” discovery) (266-67) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incubation (268) </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Perception vs. reality cont’d <ul><li>What did Murray learn about himself? What surprised him? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Time spent planning (274) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Length of incubation time (275) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Revision as planning (“reconceiving”)(275) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Degree of audience awareness (275) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>One hour protocol is hard (273) </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. Sharing my processes <ul><li>Murray writes that “we have an ethical obligation to write and to reveal our writing to our students if we are asking them to share their writing with us” (273). So, in the spirit of fulfilling my ethical obligation… </li></ul><ul><li>My composing process </li></ul>
  8. 8. Never have I ever… <ul><li>Never have I ever… </li></ul><ul><li>Like Murray, I… </li></ul><ul><li>Like Tony, I… </li></ul><ul><li>When I write, I… </li></ul>
  9. 9. Evolution of a title <ul><li>The Objectified Subject: Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>The Subjectified Object : Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ B e coming ” Objects : Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ B e coming ” Subjects : Destabilizing Gendered Vision in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ Be coming” Subjects: Towards a Democratized Politics of Vision in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>Mastering Vision: The Woman Artist as Object and Agent in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ B e coming ” Subjects : The Woman Artist as Object and Agent in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ B e coming ” Subjects: The Woman Artist as Object and Agent of the Gaze in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s “B e coming” Subjects: Envisioning the Woman Artist as Object and Agent in The Story of Avis </li></ul><ul><li>“ B e coming ” Subjects in Elizabeth Stuart Phelps’s The Story of Avis : Envisioning the Woman Artist as Object and Agent </li></ul>
  10. 10. Why is the title so important to Murray? <ul><li>Think about your title for your unit 1 paper. Would you revise it now, after having read the articles by Berkenkotter and Murray? </li></ul>
  11. 11. Genre <ul><li>Murray writes, “I suspect that when we begin to write in a new genre we have to do a great deal of revision, but that as we become familiar with a genre we can solve more writing problems in advance of a completed text” (275). </li></ul><ul><li>What genres are you familiar with? </li></ul><ul><li>As you’re writing in a new genre for your unit 2 assignment (ethnography), how do you think your process will change? </li></ul>
  12. 12. What can you learn from Murray?

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