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Library Champions for Disability Access 30th June 2016
Delegates
Gemma Bayliss (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medici...
students are from overseas means that funding is increasingly tight and departments
may need to make decisions about core ...
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Library Champions for Disability access Minutes June 2016

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Library Champions for Disability access Minutes June 2016

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Library Champions for Disability access Minutes June 2016

  1. 1. Library Champions for Disability Access 30th June 2016 Delegates Gemma Bayliss (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine); Iain Brett (Anglia Ruskin University); Stella Coker (Royal College of Nursing); Heather Dawson (LSE Library); Denise Daniels (UEL); Yvette Dickerson, (SOAS) ; Bernadette Gahan, (Imperial College); Ruth Houghton (Middlesex University); Michael Jack (Kings College London); Annie Johnson (London South Bank University); Jim Higham, (University of Kent); Teresa Pedroso (Bodleian Libraries); Carol Regulski (Kings College London); Helen Rimmer (Royal Holloway); Claire Shapiro (Regents University); Anna Stinson (Kingston University); Joanne Taplin-Green, (LSE Library Chair); Philippa Tickner, (Hillcroft College); Bill Todd, (Richmond American International University); Jessica Wykes (City University) Kings College Experience The meeting was hosted by Carol Regulski from Kings College . It began with a presentation of the University services. These described the types of services offered and the challenges of working on a multi site campus. They then focussed on the experiences of training. Much of the training is provided by the Disability Advisory service however Carol offers students a workshop in accessible formats and screen reading. Many participants are unaware of how it might be possible to make adjustments to pdfs so this is popular it also reveals to them how some pdfs are not accessible. She is then able to focus on readers that can be used to convert texts to different formats. Kings has a dedicated training hour for all staff once a week, this is repeated at 4 different times to enable staff to attend, and this has enabled carol to discuss how to create accessible formats with other staff At the end of the meeting she and Michael Jack gave the attendees a tour of the Assistive Technology rooms.so that they could view the facilities and equipment in situ. .SOAS Contact person scheme Yvette Dickerson SOAS described how they offer a bespoke service tailored to individual student needs . This has been in place for more than 15 years and is referred to as a contact rather than a buddy service to manage student expectations about the types of service offered ie library related rather than financial. Her team of 12 library assistants are all allocated a number of students. Services including fetching, scanning. Training is internal and external with partners such as the National Autistic society BITT and Clear Links. Support is often required for international students who have a previously undiagnosed condition. The service is also increasingly encompassing diverse populations including LGBT individuals who are transitioning to a new gender identity. DSA changes and the fact that many
  2. 2. students are from overseas means that funding is increasingly tight and departments may need to make decisions about core and background readings as not all materials can be made accessible. However the service is highly regarded by users and operates well with all staff receiving regular training and the existence of a backup contact so that no students are unsupported if the contact should fall ill or be unavailable. Sebastian Boo- Neurodiversity Sebastian Boo, a neurodiversity consultant and adviser who works with the LSE , provided an online video in which he described his approach as celebrating the diversity, rather than the disability of students, with a range of conditions such as dyslexia and dyspraxia. He argued that small adjustments can often make material improvements for students and gave a number of quick easy examples that could be readily adopted. These included a stand in the LSE library entrance during welcome week where students could drop by for leaflets and face to face advice. This was easy to organise and brought the service to the students. It also emphasised the acceptability of seeking help. As a result a number of students registered with the wellbeing service to declare a disability and others sought screening. Another idea was to combine neuroscience awareness with a stand on study skills and to offer quick short sessions on distressing and mindfulness for students in a library environment during exam time. The latter was successful as students did not need to devote large amounts of time and the session was in a location convenient to them Next meeting Heather will contact delegates to arrange a location in the Autumn term probably around November

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