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Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography January 2017

Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography January 2017

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Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography January 2017

  1. 1. Disability- higher education, libraries, teaching and learning. Bibliography- January 2017 Identity and stigma Donlan, M. J. (2017). Voiceless in medical school: Students with physical disabilities. (Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (1860895214). Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/docview/1860895214?accountid=9630 Abstract: Students with physical disabilities are underrepresented in medical school. Individuals with physical disabilities have largely been left out the diversity movement, which has increased access to medical education for women and minority students (Steinberg, Iezzoni, Conill, & Stineman, 2010). For students with physical disabilities who are admitted, not much is known about their experiences, thus the focus of this study was to explore the medical school experiences of individuals with physical disabilities. As the theoretical framework, the social model of disability as developed by Oliver (2009) allowed for an examination of how medical students with physical disabilities experienced the medical school environment. For this study, I utilized a qualitative approach as a guide. Seven former medical students, six males and one female, with physical disabilities were interviewed about their experiences through medical education, from their efforts to gain admission to medical school, through their didactic and clinical education and training, and ultimately to their practice as a physician. The stories of the participants created a narrative account of the subjective meaning they created. This research found that although deficit models of disability persist in society, each participant overcame their physical impairment, and societal barriers, physical and social, to complete medical school and residency programs. Each participant found success through a combination of alternative methods of acquiring knowledge and performing medical procedures, internal motivation and determination, and the support of allies. The findings demonstrate that the structural and social construction of the medical school environment is inhospitable to individuals with physical disabilities. Teaching and Learning Eitzen, Amy M.; Kinney, Marcey A.; Grillo, Kelly J.. Change. (2016) Changing the Praxis of Retention in Higher Education: A Plan to TEACH All Learners. Change, Vol. 48 (6), 58-6610.1080/00091383.2016.1247584 Abstract:The article describes changing the retention practice of "At-risk" students in higher education, which include students of color, low income students and students with disabilities. Topics discussed include the universal design for learning (UDL) defined by the Higher Education Opportunity Act, the three-tier approach to UDL
  2. 2. implementation and a sample timeline of three years for university wide implementation. USA focus. URL: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eax&AN=120392566&site=e host-live Hewett, Rachel; Douglas, Graeme; McLinden, Michael; Keil, Sue. (2017). Developing an inclusive learning environment for students with visual impairment in higher education: progressive mutual accommodation and learner experiences in the United Kingdom. European Journal of Special Needs Education. Feb 2017, Vol. 32 (1) , 89-109 DOI 10.1080/08856257.2016.1254971. Abstract: Drawing on the findings of a unique longitudinal qualitative study, this article investigates the experiences of 32 young people with visual impairment (VI) in higher education (HE) in the United Kingdom (UK) to explore how well they were able to participate on their courses. We propose and apply a Bioecological Model of Inclusive HE to interpret these experiences and examine how accommodations were made to facilitate participation. Focusing specifically on ‘curriculum access’, the results highlight the importance of accommodations that are progressive and mutual. The accommodations come in many forms and include: the provision of resources through nationally based schemes (e.g. the Disabled Students Allowance in the UK); the support, adjustments and anticipatory adjustments HE institutions should provide; and the study skills and independence skills individual students should be able to act upon. The findings showed that while the majority of participants reported that their HE institution made some adjustments to enable them to access their course, a lack of anticipatory adjustments created barriers. The most common compensation for this barrier was to provide deadline extensions, often resulting in additional pressure on other aspects of the course. Interviews with university staff highlighted limited specialist knowledge and resources within their institutions to enable accommodations for students with VI and, more broadly, understanding of how to develop an inclusive learning experience. The findings also highlighted expectations made of the learner, particularly being able to explain their required adjustments and having well-developed independent study skills. The paper has particular relevance to HE institutions in that it provides a model to aid interpretation of their role in creating an inclusive learning experience for students with VI. It also offers a reference point for professionals supporting young people with a broader range of disabilities in considering how best to prepare them for life after compulsory education.
  3. 3. URL http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bri&AN=120393230&site=e host-live Koca-Atabey, Mujde. (2017) Re-visiting the role of disability coordinators: the changing needs of disabled students and current support strategies from a UK university. European Journal of Special Needs Education. 32 (1) 137-145 DOI: 10.1080/08856257.2016.1254969. Abstract: This study aimed to investigate the system designed to support disabled university students from the perspective of disability coordinators. The research on this topic specifically is limited. Disability coordinators from a particular UK university were interviewed to better understand the support system from their own perspective. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was conducted to reveal themes related to supporting students. IPA is a tool to understand participants’ social and emotional world. The final themes were: interest in and internal motivation regarding disability issues; flexibility and disability; personal experiences of disability; good practices; and finally, time and disability. The theme time and disability appeared as a separate theme but also was embedded within the whole analysis. In addition, the results indicated that the support issue is dynamic in nature and that student needs continuously change as new needs emerge. The demographic characteristics of disabled university students have changed over time. Students are also increasingly more competent at using technology. Consequently, disability coordinators should be more active and provide faster solutions to meet higher expectations. The results and policy implications of this study are discussed with reference to the impact of time, change and context URL: http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bri&AN=120393228&site=e host-live RNIB (2017) Exam access for students with vision impairment: planning and applying for adjustments Abstract: Anna Pilson, a Qualified Teacher of Children and Young People with Vision Impairment from Sheffield, discusses how to prepare and apply for access arrangements and modified papers for candidates with vision impairment. URL: https://www.rnib.org.uk/insight-online/exam-vision-impairment-access- arrangements-plan-apply
  4. 4. Assistive technology/ accessibility Mancil, G. Richmond; Lorah, Elizabeth R.; Whitby, Peggy Schaefer (2016) Effects of iPod Touch™ Technology as Communication Devices on Peer Social Interactions across Environments Education and Training in Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 51 (3 ), 252-264 Abstract: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the use of the iPod Touch™ as a Speech Generated Device (SGD) for Functional Communication Training (FCT). The evaluation of the effects on problem behaviour, the effects on generalization and maintenance of the acquired communication repertoire, and the social initiations of peers between the new SGD (iPod Touch™) and traditional devices were conducted. The study demonstrated that the iPod Touch™ produces higher levels of peer interactions when compared to the Dynavox. These effects maintained and generalized for all three participants. Additionally, the use of the iPod Touch™ as a SGD is effective for the use of FCT. Finally, the study offered support for the social validity of the use of the iPod Touch™ and application GoTalk as a SGD, as all teachers and student participants demonstrated preference for the device when compared to the Dynavox as a SGD. Home Office. Digital (2016) Dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility The dos and don’ts of designing for accessibility are general guidelines, best design practices for making services accessible in government. Currently, there are six different posters in the series that cater to users from these areas: low vision, D/deaf and hard of hearing, dyslexia, motor disabilities, users on the autistic spectrum and users of screen readers. URL https://accessibility.blog.gov.uk/2016/09/02/dos-and-donts-on-designing-for- accessibility/ Easy Checks – A First Review of Web Accessibility. WAI’s Education and Outreach Working Group URL: https://www.w3.org/WAI/eval/preliminary Abstract: This resource helps you start to assess the accessibility of a web page. The update includes a new check on Moving, Flashing, or Blinking Content and instructions for the Web Developer Toolbar for multiple browsers.Also available Web Accessibility First Aid: Approaches for Interim Repairs https://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/improving/ is intended to help with the situation: “I need to make my website accessible and I
  5. 5. don’t even know where to start!” It provides guidance on addressing short-term accessibility fixes. Developing Organizational Policies on Web Accessibility https://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/pol helps develop a simple or comprehensive web accessibility policy for an organization. Planning and Managing Web Accessibility https://www.w3.org/WAI/impl/ helps integrate accessibility throughout the web production process. It applies to individual projects and at the organizational level.

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Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography January 2017

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