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Disability- higher education, libraries, teaching and learning.
Bibliography- February 2017
.
Assistive technology/ access...
Autism
Richardson, John T. E. (2017)
Academic attainment in students with autism spectrum disorders in
distance education....
F18 - applying for disabled students’ allowances.
https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/applying-disabled-students%E2%80%99-
...
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Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography February 2017

  1. 1. Disability- higher education, libraries, teaching and learning. Bibliography- February 2017 . Assistive technology/ accessibility Finalists Announced for Accessible Books Consortium’s 2017 International Excellence Award http://www.accessiblebooksconsortium.org/news/en/2017/news_0001.html The finalists for the 2017 ABC International Excellence Award for Accessible Publishing. The ABC Award recognizes two categories: one for publishers and one for project initiatives. The winners in each category will be announced at the awards ceremony to be held at the London Book Fair on the evening of Tuesday, March 14, 2017 Sun, Yu Ting. (2017) Assessment of the newly developed methods for accessibility evaluations of e- textbooks California State University, Long Beach, ProQuest Dissertations Publishing. Open Access URL: http://pqdtopen.proquest.com/doc/1870036743.html?FMT=ABS Abstract: Digital materials have become popular and have attracted a diverse group of users, such as college students, who benefit from low cost and portable access to the materials. However, college students with disabilities might have trouble accessing electronic materials. Laws and standards provide guidance on making digital documents accessible but are being implemented slowly. Published materials on the market might have accessibility issues. Efforts have been made to produce evaluation methods for eBooks. Automated tools have been examined in multiple studies but using automated tools to evaluate accessibility of electronic materials is not enough; evaluators are needed. This study assessed a newly developed accessibility evaluation methodology that was designed for e-textbooks and examined whether being rated as highly accessible makes a difference in user experience and performance. This study recruited 6 visually impaired students and 6 students with normal or corrected-to-normal vision and asked them to interact with the eBooks. User experience and performance were measured using subjective questionnaires, time, and accuracy. Results showed differences between high and low accessibility levels in user experience but not in user performance.
  2. 2. Autism Richardson, John T. E. (2017) Academic attainment in students with autism spectrum disorders in distance education. Open Learning. 32 (1) 81-91 DOI: 10.1080/02680513.2016.1272446. Abstract: This investigation studied attainment in students with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) who were taking modules by distance learning with the UK Open University in 2012. Students with ASDs who had no additional disabilities were as likely as non-disabled students to complete the modules that they had taken, to pass the modules that they had completed and to obtain good grades for the modules that they had passed. Students with ASDs who had additional disabilities were less likely than non-disabled students to complete the modules that they had taken, but they were as likely as non-disabled students to pass the modules that they had completed and to obtain good grades for the modules that they had passed. Their lower completion rate presumably reflects the impact of their additional disabilities rather than their ASDs. In distance education, at least, students with ASDs tend to perform on a par with their non-disabled peers Stevenson, K.; Cornell, K.; Hinchcliffe, V. (2016). Let's Talk Autism' -a school-based project for students to explore and share their experiences of being autistic Support for learning , 2016, 31(3), 208-234 Understanding what autism means on a personal level can be an important process for young people on the autistic spectrum, and being able to reflect on this and discuss with autistic peers can be particularly helpful. However, opportunities may be restricted by reluctance to talk about diagnosis and because of difficulties in communication inherent in autism. This article describes a therapeutic media project within an ASD school that attempted to support young people to reflect together about what autism meant for them and create resources to share with others. The process is described and main themes of discussions analysed using thematic analysis. Main themes emerged of making sense of diagnosis, experiences of difference and transition to adulthood. Various strategies to manage diagnosis and negotiate identity also emerged. Issues around informed consent and confidentiality and the therapeutic value of such groups are discussed LSE URL http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.gate3.library.lse.ac.uk/doi/10.1111/1467-9604.12130/ EducationalPolicy Disability Rights UK (2017). Updated education factsheet.
  3. 3. F18 - applying for disabled students’ allowances. https://www.disabilityrightsuk.org/applying-disabled-students%E2%80%99- allowances-dsa Taylor, Mark; Turnbull, Yvonne; Bleasdale, Jo; Francis, Hulya; Forsyth, Henry (2016) Transforming support for students with disabilities in UK Higher Education. Support for Learning. 31 (4) 367-384 DOI: 10.1111/1467-9604.12143. Abstract: Intended UK government changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance will have a significant impact on the support that UK universities provide for students with disabilities. In this article we examine the types of transformation that may be needed to support for university students with disabilities, from a socio-technical perspective. The research reported in this article involved a year-long case study in a UK university. The potential changes required to support for students with disabilities within the university studied, to cater for the proposed UK government changes to the Disabled Students' Allowance, include: providing non-medical helpers through external agencies; developing a dyslexia screening process; providing enhanced library services, including access to printers and scanners and assistance with assistive software; providing laptops with assistive software; making assistive software available in a limited form in computing laboratories; and more co-ordinated special examination provision. LSE URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com.gate3.library.lse.ac.uk/doi/10.1111/1467- 9604.12143/abstract

Disability, Higher education, libraries, teaching and learning bibliography February 2017

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