Patrice Johnson Hearing Protection: the Dangers of Noise Exposure
<ul><li>Outer ear:  Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear:  Ear drum (tympanic membrane)  </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li...
How we hear
<ul><li>Outer ear:  Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear:  Ear drum (tympanic membrane)  </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li...
How we hear
<ul><li>Outer ear:  Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear:  Ear drum (tympanic membrane)  </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li...
How we hear
                                           
Noise <ul><li>What is noise?  </li></ul><ul><li>Different sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occupational: </li></ul></ul><ul>...
<ul><li>Risk of damage depends on:  </li></ul><ul><li>Level of noise  </li></ul><ul><li>Time of exposure (how long and how...
How much noise?  <ul><li>Sound at a distance:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As the distance is doubled from the sound source the ...
<ul><li>Hearing damage risk is negligible below 75 dB </li></ul><ul><li>A vacuum cleaner emits about 85dB  </li></ul>
Noise Levels Exposure Length:  For every 3dB louder, the sound is twice as strong so the exposure time should halve.
iPods Safe exposure limit is 85 decibels for eight hours a day.  100dB = 15min  Cory Portnuff/Dept. of Speech, Language an...
iPod listening time vs % volume Cory Portnuff/Dept. of Speech, Language and Hearing Science, University of Colorado; Brian...
Personal stereos <ul><li>Ipods at low volumes are fine </li></ul><ul><li>Ipods at high volumes for long periods of time ca...
What happens when sounds are too loud?  <ul><li>Causes damage to the hair cells in the cochlea  </li></ul><ul><li>This mea...
Cochlear Hair Cells Healthy  Damaged
<ul><li>Permanent  </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing Loss </li></ul><ul><li>The effect of repeated noise  exposure on hearing is u...
Typical hearing loss from noise exposure
Hearing Loss and Noise Exposure
<ul><li>Ability to hear soft and medium high pitch tones eg. birds, mobile ringing, is lost </li></ul><ul><li>Missing begi...
Judging harmful noise levels  <ul><li>Noise is as loud or louder than heavy traffic </li></ul><ul><li>You have to raise yo...
Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) <ul><li>Can NIHL be detected early? </li></ul><ul><li>Early signs of temporary hearing l...
NIHL <ul><li>Does Noise-Induced Hearing Loss cause Any Pain? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Generally no </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
Impact of Hearing Loss <ul><li>The Listen Hear! Report (Access Economics February 2006): </li></ul><ul><li>Financial cost ...
Protecting Your Hearing <ul><li>Avoid loud noises/ music </li></ul><ul><li>Wear earplugs when exposed to loud noise/music ...
Protecting Your Hearing <ul><li>Ear Plugs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Foam disposable ear plugs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Music...
Summary  <ul><li>Impact on hearing determined by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How long </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How loud  </li...
Questions <ul><li>Any Questions?  </li></ul>
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Hearing and Balance Centre: 2011 Hearing Awareness Week - Hearing Protection: the Dangers of Noise Exposure - Patrice Johnson

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  • Impulse noise is a one off loud sound Acoustic trauma normally occurs at levels greater than a 140 dB A weighting for the way human perceive mid range continuous sounds (60dB equal loudness curve) C weighting for the way humans perceive impluse (very loud) sounds (80dB flatter on equal loudness curve) LC = 140dB
  • For example, aeroplane is 120dB at 25 metres away. DISTANCE : This is a result of the inverse square law.
  • This is the world health organisation recommendations As the sound level increases 3dB the exposure length halves.
  • requiring high level of concentration
  • Hearing and Balance Centre: 2011 Hearing Awareness Week - Hearing Protection: the Dangers of Noise Exposure - Patrice Johnson

    1. 1. Patrice Johnson Hearing Protection: the Dangers of Noise Exposure
    2. 2. <ul><li>Outer ear: Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear: Ear drum (tympanic membrane) </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li></ul><ul><li>Inner ear: Cochlea </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-circular canals </li></ul><ul><li>Auditory nerve </li></ul>The Ear
    3. 3. How we hear
    4. 4. <ul><li>Outer ear: Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear: Ear drum (tympanic membrane) </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li></ul><ul><li>Inner ear: Cochlea </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-circular canals </li></ul><ul><li>Auditory nerve </li></ul>The Ear
    5. 5. How we hear
    6. 6. <ul><li>Outer ear: Ear canal </li></ul><ul><li>Middle ear: Ear drum (tympanic membrane) </li></ul><ul><li>Ossicles </li></ul><ul><li>Inner ear: Cochlea </li></ul><ul><li>Semi-circular canals </li></ul><ul><li>Auditory nerve </li></ul>The Ear
    7. 7. How we hear
    8. 8.                                            
    9. 9. Noise <ul><li>What is noise? </li></ul><ul><li>Different sources: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Occupational: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mining </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Building industry </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recreational: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Personal stereos e.g. Ipods </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Power tools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lawn mowers </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Motor sports </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Night clubs </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Concerts </li></ul></ul></ul>
    10. 10. <ul><li>Risk of damage depends on: </li></ul><ul><li>Level of noise </li></ul><ul><li>Time of exposure (how long and how often) </li></ul><ul><li>Pitch (frequency) of sounds can also effect the degree of damage. High pitch more damaging. </li></ul>Noise
    11. 11. How much noise? <ul><li>Sound at a distance: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As the distance is doubled from the sound source the sound level decreases 6dB SPL </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>As the distance is halved from the sound source the sound level increases 6dB SPL </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What does this mean? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Further you are from the noise source, the better </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. <ul><li>Hearing damage risk is negligible below 75 dB </li></ul><ul><li>A vacuum cleaner emits about 85dB </li></ul>
    13. 13. Noise Levels Exposure Length: For every 3dB louder, the sound is twice as strong so the exposure time should halve.
    14. 14. iPods Safe exposure limit is 85 decibels for eight hours a day. 100dB = 15min Cory Portnuff/Dept. of Speech, Language and Hearing Science, University of Colorado; Brian Fligor/Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School
    15. 15. iPod listening time vs % volume Cory Portnuff/Dept. of Speech, Language and Hearing Science, University of Colorado; Brian Fligor/Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School
    16. 16. Personal stereos <ul><li>Ipods at low volumes are fine </li></ul><ul><li>Ipods at high volumes for long periods of time can damage your hearing </li></ul>
    17. 17. What happens when sounds are too loud? <ul><li>Causes damage to the hair cells in the cochlea </li></ul><ul><li>This means softer sounds may no longer be transmitted </li></ul>
    18. 18. Cochlear Hair Cells Healthy Damaged
    19. 19. <ul><li>Permanent </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing Loss </li></ul><ul><li>The effect of repeated noise exposure on hearing is usually permanent . </li></ul><ul><li>Hair cells can not repair themselves. There is no cure for this hearing loss. </li></ul><ul><li>Temporary </li></ul><ul><li>Hearing Loss </li></ul><ul><li>Noise can temporarily cause a hearing loss by “tiring out” the hair cells </li></ul><ul><li>First signs: ringing in the ears after noise exposure. </li></ul>
    20. 20. Typical hearing loss from noise exposure
    21. 21. Hearing Loss and Noise Exposure
    22. 22. <ul><li>Ability to hear soft and medium high pitch tones eg. birds, mobile ringing, is lost </li></ul><ul><li>Missing beginning or end of a word or sentence </li></ul><ul><li>Conversations in a group or busy environment e.g. restaurant, meetings </li></ul><ul><li>Difficulties to differentiate similar words </li></ul><ul><li>Musical difficulties: melody and pitch discrimination </li></ul>How high frequency hearing loss impacts hearing
    23. 23. Judging harmful noise levels <ul><li>Noise is as loud or louder than heavy traffic </li></ul><ul><li>You have to raise your voice to speak to someone 1 metre away </li></ul><ul><li>Things sound different after you’ve been exposed to noise </li></ul><ul><li>You hear ringing or other noises in your ears after you’ve been exposed to noise </li></ul>
    24. 24. Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) <ul><li>Can NIHL be detected early? </li></ul><ul><li>Early signs of temporary hearing loss </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tinnitus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Muffled hearing e.g. After a loud concert </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Usually goes undetected until it affects the ability to follow conversations in noisy environments e.g. Restaurant </li></ul>
    25. 25. NIHL <ul><li>Does Noise-Induced Hearing Loss cause Any Pain? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Generally no </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Only very loud sounds such as a bomb result in pain </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>General loud sounds e.g. lawnmower do not cause pain, but can result in hearing loss </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. Impact of Hearing Loss <ul><li>The Listen Hear! Report (Access Economics February 2006): </li></ul><ul><li>Financial cost to Australia of $11.75 billion per annum or 1.4% of GDP </li></ul><ul><li>1 in 6 Australians is affected by hearing loss </li></ul><ul><li>Expected to increase to 1 in every 4 Australians by 2050 </li></ul><ul><li>With 36% of hearing loss attributable to excessive noise exposure </li></ul>
    27. 27. Protecting Your Hearing <ul><li>Avoid loud noises/ music </li></ul><ul><li>Wear earplugs when exposed to loud noise/music (eg. Concert and motor races) </li></ul><ul><li>Loud music can be just as dangerous as noisy machinery. </li></ul><ul><li>Balls of cottonwool or paper tissue won’t protect your hearing. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to fit earplugs correctly. Poorly fitted earplugs offer little protection. </li></ul>
    28. 28. Protecting Your Hearing <ul><li>Ear Plugs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Foam disposable ear plugs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Musician’s ear plugs – 3 levels of attenuation and allow music or voice to be monitored </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Noise plugs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ear muffs </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Summary <ul><li>Impact on hearing determined by: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How long </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How loud </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How often </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoid loud sounds </li></ul><ul><li>Use hearing protection </li></ul>
    30. 30. Questions <ul><li>Any Questions? </li></ul>

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