From eCommerce to eCommerce 2.0 - The Changing Role of the Customer

2,281 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,281
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
13
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
42
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

From eCommerce to eCommerce 2.0 - The Changing Role of the Customer

  1. 1. From eCommerce to eCommerce 2.0 - the Changing Role of the Customer Liberec Informatics Forum 4th November 2010 Hans-Dieter Zimmermann FHS St. Gallen, University of Applied Sciences www.hdzimmermann.net This presentation is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 2.5 Switzerland License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.5/ch/
  2. 2. FHS eSociety – Interdisciplinary Research Group on eSociety 2 www.esociety.net
  3. 3. Goals 3 Taking a broader perspective:  Overview of the developments of electronic markets and electronic commerce in the last two decades Examples for eCommerce 2.0 applications Focus on users’ perspective
  4. 4. Agenda 4 Emergence of Electronic Markets The eCommerce Pioneers The Customer in the Center: eCommerce 2.0  Five concepts Conclusions
  5. 5. Emergence of Electronic Markets or How it Began 5
  6. 6. The World Wide Web 6 You remember? There was a life before the Web! The Web started only in August 1991 ! http://www.flickr.com/photos/27443865@N08/
  7. 7. Electronic Market Hypothesis 7 CACM paper June 1987 Based on Transaction Cost Economics Main idea: More market-like coordination Malone, Thomas; Yates, Joanne; Benjamin, Robert I.: Electronic markets and electronic hierarchies, Communication of the ACM 30, 484-497 (1987)
  8. 8. Move to the Market - Hypothesis 8 Malone,Thomas;Yates,Joanne;Benjamin,RobertI.:Electronicmarketsand electronichierarchies,CommunicationoftheACM30,484-497(1987)
  9. 9. Electronic Markets 9 Newsletter September 1991 SSCI listed journal Vol 20 (2010)
  10. 10. A Pioneer: The Electronic Mall Bodensee (EMB) Bottom Up development of an electronic marketplace … understood as an open agora … with a strong regional focus … covering parts three countries (Austria, Germany, and Switzerland) ... by regional initiatives.  First electronic marketplace in Europe with a strong regional focus First Online June 1995 10
  11. 11. The eCommerce Pioneers 11
  12. 12. 1995 - Amazon Start as an Online bookseller Today:  Online shopping center  Market platforms for  Consumers and  Businesses
  13. 13. 1995 - eBay 13 Start as an Online auction based marketplace („flea market“) Today: marketplace for  C2C and B2C  Auctions  Fixed prices  New products
  14. 14. Changing Value Creation in the Digital Economy: Changing Value Creation Structures: New Intermediaries
  15. 15. Changing Value Creation Structures: New Intermediaries 15 [Sarkar,Mitra;Butler,Brian;Steinfield,Charles:Intermediariesand Cybermediaries,JCMC-JournalofComputer-MediatedCommunication, Vol.1(1995),No.3]
  16. 16. Changing Value Creation Structures: New Intermediaries 16 [Sarkar et al. 1995]
  17. 17. Changing Value Creation in the Digital Economy: Changing Value Creation Processes: The Integration of Customers into Value Creation
  18. 18. The Integration of Customers into Value Creation 18 SupplierSupplier CustomerCustomer Traditional Value Chain CustomersCustomers Future (?)Inter- mediary Inter- mediary  Solution  Need  ‘Production’ WholesalerWholesaler RetailerRetailer
  19. 19. The Integration of Customers into Value Creation 19 eBay  Individual as seller or buyer  Through ratings the individual contributes to the business partner’s profile  new responsibility Amazon  Evaluation of products  Individual Recommendations  Affiliate program  …  the individual as co-creator of services
  20. 20. The Customer in the Center: eCommerce 2.0
  21. 21. 1. Comments, Evaluation, Recommendations, … 21 Individuals can give feedback on any transaction  Product related  Business partner related
  22. 22. 1. Comments, Evaluation, Recommendations, … 22
  23. 23. 1. Comments, Evaluation, Recommendations, … 23
  24. 24. 1. Comments, Evaluation, Recommendations, … 24
  25. 25. [http://faz-community.faz.net/blogs/netzkonom/archive/2008/11/23/marketing-im-web-2-0.aspx] 1. Comments, Evaluation, Recommendations, …
  26. 26. [http://faz-community.faz.net/blogs/netzkonom/archive/2008/11/23/marketing-im-web-2-0.aspx]
  27. 27. 2. Social Software 27  Engage people  Connect people Weblogs Microblogs (Twitter, …) Wikis Social Network Services (Facebook, LinkedIn, XING, …) … location based SNS (Foursquare, Gowalla, …) Social Bookmarking (del.icio.us, …) … for scholarly references (BibSonomy, CiteULike, Mendeley, …) Social Music (blip.fm, spotify, simfy, …) Social Shopping Social Media Sharing (Flickr, Youtube, …) SocialTV … http://www.flickr.com/photos/ross/3941293767/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/thbernhardt/2984100802/
  28. 28. Social Software Options Matrix 28 http://www.flickr.com/photos/vanderwal/3364627666/
  29. 29. Social Software Value Matrix 29 http://www.flickr.com/photos/ross/3486654131/
  30. 30. 2. Social Software – Social Networks: Facebook 30 Create your community http://www.facebook.com/adidasoriginals
  31. 31. 3. Crowdsourcing 31 Utilizing the intelligence of the masses Outsourcing of tasks  Brainstorming, design, funding, … Examples  spreadshirt.de  Starbucks Idea (mystarbucksidea.force.com)  IdeaStorm (Dell) (www.ideastorm.com)  Library of Congress & Flickr (www.loc.gov/rr/print/flickr_pilot.html)  … Platforms  atizo.ch, bonspin.de, ideabounty.com, … http://www.flickr.com/photos/beansandgrapes/4196948772/
  32. 32. 3. Crowdsourcing - Example 32 www.thejohnnycashproject.com
  33. 33. 4. Mass Customization 33 Combining  individualization of products and  efficiencies of mass production Examples  Books (pegastar.com)  Watches (121time.com)  Shirts (dolzer.de)  Parts (emachineshop.com)  Sport shoes http://nikeid.nike.com
  34. 34. Mass Customization - Example 34 http://www.myswisschocolate.ch/
  35. 35. 5. The Long Tail
  36. 36. ‚Web 2.0‘ – The Long Tail (Chris Anderson, 2004, www.wired.com/wired/archive/12.10/tail.html) The Three Forces of the Long Tail  Force 1: Democratize the tools of production  Force 2: Democratize the tools of distribution  Force 3: Connect supply and demand
  37. 37. 37
  38. 38. Conclusions
  39. 39. 39 The role of the customer has changed dramatically in the last two decades Web 1.0: Customers at the end of the one-way digitalized value chain Web 2.0: Customers can actively participate in value creation in different stages and roles such as expert, consultant, designer, or seller.  Consumers are at eye-level with suppliers  … take responsibilities  … needs media and information literacy
  40. 40. The 24th Bled eConference eFuture: Creating Solutions for the Individual, Organisations and Society June 12-15, 2011 http://BledConference.org Faculty of Organizational Sciences, University of Maribor Government of the Republic of Slovenia European Commission … and another pioneer:
  41. 41. Contact Hans-Dieter Zimmermann FHS St. Gallen University of Applied Sciences Institute for Information and Process Management IPM-FHS Teufener Strasse 2, 9000 St. Gallen, Schwitzerland Tel. +41 71 228 7650, Mobil +41 76 220 1105 hansdieter.zimmermann@fhsg.ch www.esociety.net , @FHS_eSociety www.fhsg.ch/ipm www.hdzimmermann.net, blog.hdzimmermann.net, @hdzimmermann

×