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Stories of Collective Impact: How to Use the Principles of
Asset Based Community Development and Results Based
Accountabil...
Workshop Premise
To improve lives of the families and their members in
today’s world requires neighborhoods and their resi...
 Collective Impact Today
 Why Place-Based Strategies and Community Engagement are
Critical
 Introduction to ABCD – Defi...
Hand, Head and Heart Exercise
Pair up with a person you don’t know very well. Take a few minutes to
think about your asset...
Collective Impact - Today
Collective Impact - Conditions
John Kania & Mark Krame
Common Agenda
Shared Measurement
Multiple Reinforcing
Activities
Co...
Lisbeth Schorr: Lessons on What Works
Suggests five lessons:
 Be clear about the purposes of our work, the outcomes we ar...
Assumptions for Creating Community
Change – Help Children, Youth and Families
Succeed
 It takes a wide variety of strateg...
Many Factors Contribute to Pressing Community Issues
Community
Issue
Personal
choices
Family
characteristics
System
relati...
Most Direct-service Programs Address Only One or Two
Factors
Community
Issue
Personal
choices
Family
characteristics
Syste...
Effective Collective Impact: Addresses More of the
Factors with New Approaches and Additional Partner
Community
Issue
Pers...
Collective Impact vs. Collaboration
Collaboration In Addition to What You Do
Collective Impact Is What You Do
Collective Impact – Effective
Partnerships
 Organizations do not work together – People Do
 Should not be rushed – It ta...
Assumptions for Creating Community
Change – Help Children, Youth and Families
Succeed
 It takes a wide variety of strateg...
Assumptions for Creating Community
Change – Help Children, Youth and Families
Succeed
 It takes a wide variety of strateg...
What “Engage the Community” Means
 Not based on an opinion poll
 Not organizing the community to
care about your agenda
...
Assumptions for Creating Community
Change – Help Children, Youth and Families
Succeed
 It takes a wide variety of strateg...
Why Place Matters “To solve our social
problems in our
communities, the
solution must be to
build stronger
communities not...
Changes in Neighborhoods -- Examples
• Vacant lots are cleaned up and outfitted with
safe and sturdy playground equipment
...
Self
Family
Friends
Neighbors
Associations
Organizations
Government
Circles of Care and Responsibilities
Faith Based
Helpi...
Source: “Getting to Maybe: How the World Is Changed”
Frances Westley, Brenda Zimmerman, Michael Patton
Simple, Complicated...
Introduction to ABCD –
Definitions & Principles
Asset Based Community Development
It is the capacities of local people and their
associations that build powerful communit...
 It starts with the simple truth, everyone has gifts
 The belief that neighborhoods and communities are built by focusin...
Six Types of Assets
 Individual talents and skills
 Local associations
 Local institutions
 Land, property, and the
en...
Effective Communities
Look inside first to solve problems
Relationships are seen as power
Have a good sense of assets a...
The Three Acts of ABCD
How do you engage people to share
their gifts?
Focus on the gifts of
their Heart
The Roles of Residents in Building a
Stronger Community
“Unfortunately, many leaders and even some
neighbors think that the idea of a strong local
community is sort of “nice,” a ...
What Only Individuals Can Do:
 Primary source of our health
 Safety and security
 The future of our earth – the environ...
Determinants of a Healthy Community
 Personal Behaviors – what we eat, how much we drink,
whether we smoke, whether we ex...
County Health Rankings
What Only Individuals Can Do:
 Primary source of our health
 Safety and security
 The future of our earth – the environ...
Healthy communities
Require both Care and Service
Place-based strategies unlock the power of care
The Path of Residents
People as
recipients of
service
Rural Area in Upstate New York - Example
Population 5,041, scattered across three small towns and a large rural area
“Our Town
Rocks” has
helped our
community move
from a sense of
“down on our
luck” to a sense
of hopefulness.”
D. Anderson
...
Asset Mapping – Discover-Ask-
Connect – From Mapping to
Mobilizing
Asset Mapping
Exercise
1. Get Paper and Markers
2. Pick a Neighborhood or Area
3. Draw the area (key streets)
4. Plot the ...
Asset Mapping
 Not just another list of resources
 It is:
 A strategy to identify assets that are available
from within...
Through asset mapping,
community residents move
from:
Needs Map: Community
Unemployment Housing
Projects
Poverty
Uninsured
Illiteracy
Child Abuse
Truancy
Crime
Teen Mothers Gan...
Consequences of the Power of the
Needs Map
 Internalizations of the “deficiencies” identified
by local residents
 Destru...
The Asset Map: Community
Gifts of Individuals
Citizens’ Associations
Local Institutions
Skills Youth
Artists
Labeled
Peopl...
Consequences of Asset Mapping
 Shift in Power!!!
 Inclusiveness – all people have gifts and talents
 Relationship build...
Asset Mapping Steps
 Create a Resident Leadership Team
 Select the geographic area for action
 Draw first Asset Map
 I...
Step 1: Create a Resident Leadership Team
 Widen the circle
 Create leadership
 Look for people that have a passion for...
Step 2: Select the geographic area for action
 An Area the Resident Leadership Team calls
home – they all live there
 An...
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
SchoolSchool
SchoolSchool
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
Store...
Step 4: Identify individual resident’s gifts and passions
 Create Questionnaire
 Develop strategy to interview
residents...
NEIGHBORS THAT CARE
Name:________________________________________________
Phone:__________________________________________...
Step 5: Map Resident Gifts and Passions
 Get a map that will enable actual address
mapping
 Map individuals on the map –...
Group and Map by Passions
Colored Sticky Dots
= Children and Youth
= Seniors
= Hunger
= Crime and Safety
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
SchoolSchool
SchoolSchool
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
Store...
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
ChurchChurch
SchoolSchool
SchoolSchool
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
AgencyAgency
Store...
Step 7: Celebrate
Make it fun and take time to
celebrate small successes.
THE NEW ROLE OF INSTITUTIONS –
HOW INSTITUTIONS CAN USE ALL
THEIR ASSETS TO BUILD STRONGER
COMMUNITIES AND FAMILIES
Busine...
Building healthy communities
requires agencies to. .
Change their thinking from
Siloed Thinking to Holistic
Approaches
From Starting with Needs
To Starting with Strengths
From Top-Down
To Community-Driven
INSTITUTIONS SHOULD LEAD
BY STEPPING BACK TO
CREATE SPACE FOR CITIZEN
AND COMMUNITY ACTION
The role of agencies and
programs should not be to
just provide services to meet
client needs
The most effective role we
c...
Institutional Assets
More than an Institution’s
Products or Services
“A neighborhood may not need an agency’s hours of
cou...
Tools for Agencies - Leading By
Stepping Back
Five Strategic Questions:
1. What functions could community people perform by
themselves?
2. What functions can people ach...
What Can We Stop Doing
Exercise
Think about the services your agency offers
and make a list of the activities that you
cou...
What can residents do by themselves for
themselves? -- Examples
• Parents and other caregivers use everyday moments to
enc...
What functions can people achieve with
some additional help from institutions? --
Examples
• Businesses make time and spac...
What do residents need done that they can’t
do? -- Examples
• The human services system engages all service providers in
c...
Build Community Capacity:
 Offer leadership training
 Assist with outreach tools like translation
 Work with associatio...
First, Do No Harm:
 Don’t distract the community from its own
priorities.
 Don’t force the community into the
bureaucrac...
Assessing Your Organization
 What is your organization’s relationship to community residents? How
accountable is your org...
Resources for Organizations
Discovering Community Power: A Guide to
Mobilizing Local Assets and Your
Organization's Capaci...
Sample:
Agency
Assets
Profile
Agency
Assets
Profile
A tool to illustrate
partnerships that your
organization already has
with institutions or
associations in your
community a...
10 LESSONS from Broadway United Methodist
Church – Indianapolis, IN
1. Begin with what’s already
there--and use it.
2. Inv...
10 LESSONS from Broadway United Methodist
Church – (cont.)
6. Know that change is slow.
7. There will be drama.
There is a...
Twelve Guiding Principles for Successful Place–
Based Community Collective Impact
 People, Places and Results Matter
 Ev...
Lessons Learned from a Collective Impact
Perspective
 It can not be overstated that the long term success and
sustainabil...
Bill Moyers Journal
America Bracho
http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=MEqdNOo9SDY
ABCD Tools
A  Community Building Principles and Action Steps Chart – A quick guide to the principles of ABCD
community bui...
ABCD Toolkit
http://hdanielsduncanconsulting.org/
Resources - ABCD
ABCD Institute – Order Publications
http://www.abcdinst...
H. Daniels Duncan
Faculty Member
Asset Based Community Development Institute
512.788.8646
dan@hddabcd.org
Asset Based Comm...
H. daniels duncan consulting abcd and community partnerships 08 06 2013
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H. daniels duncan consulting abcd and community partnerships 08 06 2013

  1. 1. Stories of Collective Impact: How to Use the Principles of Asset Based Community Development and Results Based Accountability to Achieve Greater Results and Impact August 6, 2013 Asset Based Community Development H. Daniels Duncan, Faculty Member ABCD Institute
  2. 2. Workshop Premise To improve lives of the families and their members in today’s world requires neighborhoods and their residents to be involved as coproduces of their own and their community’s well-being. Everyone has something to contribute and we need their “gifts and assets”. Using the principles of Asset-Based Community Development funders and agencies can help create powerful community partnerships to build healthier, safer and stronger neighborhoods and communities.
  3. 3.  Collective Impact Today  Why Place-Based Strategies and Community Engagement are Critical  Introduction to ABCD – Definitions & Principles  Examples of ABCD in action  The roles of Residents in Building a Stronger Community  Asset Mapping – Discover-Ask-Connect – From Mapping to Mobilizing  The New Role of Institutions – How Institutions Can Use All Their Assets to Build a Stronger Community  Tools for Agencies - Leading By Stepping Back Workshop Topics:
  4. 4. Hand, Head and Heart Exercise Pair up with a person you don’t know very well. Take a few minutes to think about your assets and then take about five minutes each to share these assets with the other person in three realms of knowing. Hand – Physical skills you possess that you would be willing to teach others. I.E., carpentry, photography, painting, bicycle repair… Head – Knowledge that you have in a particular area like child development, health care, history of the neighborhood… Heart – What are your passions; what stirs you to action; what would you walk across hot coals for?
  5. 5. Collective Impact - Today
  6. 6. Collective Impact - Conditions John Kania & Mark Krame Common Agenda Shared Measurement Multiple Reinforcing Activities Continuous Communication Backbone Support • Common understanding of the complex problem • Shared vision for change • Collecting data and measuring results • Focus on learning and performance management • Shared accountably • Willingness to adapt individual activities and coordinate • Focus on what works including no-cost and low cost community engagement • Consistent and open communication • Focus on building trust • Separate organization(s) with staff • Resources and skills to convene and coordinate the work of the partners and the community
  7. 7. Lisbeth Schorr: Lessons on What Works Suggests five lessons:  Be clear about the purposes of our work, the outcomes we are trying to achieve  Be willing to be held accountable for achieving those purposes  Create and sustain the partnerships to achieve these purposes  Move audaciously into the world beyond programs  Have the capacity to take community-wide responsibility to assure that actions that will lead to improved lives will actually happen Source: Lisbeth Schorr Keynote Address, Santa Clara County Children’s Summit – January 31, 2008
  8. 8. Assumptions for Creating Community Change – Help Children, Youth and Families Succeed  It takes a wide variety of strategies and activities to achieve community change – Policy Change, Service Enhancement & Resident Engagement  Accept Vulnerability – speak the truth - Learn from successes as well as failures  To achieve real impact requires the community and its residents to be engaged and involved  Communities have an abundance of resources. The issue is that they have not been identified and engaged  All of our activities should be directed at increasing and not stifling community engagement  Place matters
  9. 9. Many Factors Contribute to Pressing Community Issues Community Issue Personal choices Family characteristics System relationships Educational system practices Health care system practices Media messages Historical trends Economic conditions Public attitudes Public sector practices Private sector practices Neighborhood conditions
  10. 10. Most Direct-service Programs Address Only One or Two Factors Community Issue Personal choices Family characteristics System relationships Educational system practices Health care system practices Media messages Historical trends Economic conditions Public attitudes Public sector practices Private sector practices Neighborhood conditions
  11. 11. Effective Collective Impact: Addresses More of the Factors with New Approaches and Additional Partner Community Issue Personal choices Family characteristics System relationships Educational system practices Health care system practices Media messages Historical trends Economic conditions Public attitudes Public sector practices Private sector practices Neighborhood conditions
  12. 12. Collective Impact vs. Collaboration Collaboration In Addition to What You Do Collective Impact Is What You Do
  13. 13. Collective Impact – Effective Partnerships  Organizations do not work together – People Do  Should not be rushed – It takes time to build trust and relationships  Effective partnerships are based on:  A common purpose;  Relationships; and  Trust  When key people change assume the partnership re-sets to zero – Therefore we must always be focused on building relationships and trust.
  14. 14. Assumptions for Creating Community Change – Help Children, Youth and Families Succeed  It takes a wide variety of strategies and activities to achieve community change – Policy Change, Service Enhancement & Resident Engagement  Accept Vulnerability – speak the truth - Learn from successes as well as failures  To achieve real impact requires the community and its residents to be engaged and involved  Communities have an abundance of resources. The issue is that they have not been identified and engaged  All of our activities should be directed at increasing and not stifling community engagement  Place matters
  15. 15. Assumptions for Creating Community Change – Help Children, Youth and Families Succeed  It takes a wide variety of strategies and activities to achieve community change – Policy Change, Service Enhancement & Resident Engagement  Accept Vulnerability – speak the truth - Learn from successes as well as failures  To achieve real impact requires the community and its residents to be engaged and involved  Communities have an abundance of resources. The issue is that they have not been identified and engaged  All of our activities should be directed at increasing and not stifling community engagement  Place matters
  16. 16. What “Engage the Community” Means  Not based on an opinion poll  Not organizing the community to care about your agenda  Identifying the individuals that already care about the issues and mobilizing their action
  17. 17. Assumptions for Creating Community Change – Help Children, Youth and Families Succeed  It takes a wide variety of strategies and activities to achieve community change – Policy Change, Service Enhancement & Resident Engagement  Accept Vulnerability – speak the truth - Learn from successes as well as failures  To achieve real impact requires the community and its residents to be engaged and involved  Communities have an abundance of resources. The issue is that they have not been identified and engaged  All of our activities should be directed at increasing and not stifling community engagement  Place matters
  18. 18. Why Place Matters “To solve our social problems in our communities, the solution must be to build stronger communities not just stronger programs and services. We forget that people live in communities and that families, friends, neighbors, and faith communities have always been the front lines of how communities solve problems.” Paul Schmitz
  19. 19. Changes in Neighborhoods -- Examples • Vacant lots are cleaned up and outfitted with safe and sturdy playground equipment • Neighborhood-based businesses are flourishing • Housing is safe and complies with local codes • Decent-paying jobs are available in the neighborhood • Residents take action if they see suspicious or illegal activity
  20. 20. Self Family Friends Neighbors Associations Organizations Government Circles of Care and Responsibilities Faith Based Helping Professionals
  21. 21. Source: “Getting to Maybe: How the World Is Changed” Frances Westley, Brenda Zimmerman, Michael Patton Simple, Complicated and Complex Problems Understand how complicated the problems are and the lives of those we serve
  22. 22. Introduction to ABCD – Definitions & Principles
  23. 23. Asset Based Community Development It is the capacities of local people and their associations that build powerful communities. What can we do with what we already have.
  24. 24.  It starts with the simple truth, everyone has gifts  The belief that neighborhoods and communities are built by focusing on the strengths and capacities of the citizens and associations that call the community “home.”  A place-based approach focusing on the assets of an identified geographic area.  The belief that the assets of a community's institutions can be identified and mobilized to build community not just deliver services.  A range of approaches and tools, such as asset mapping, that can put these beliefs into practice. What is ABCD?
  25. 25. Six Types of Assets  Individual talents and skills  Local associations  Local institutions  Land, property, and the environment  Economic strengths  Culture and Stories
  26. 26. Effective Communities Look inside first to solve problems Relationships are seen as power Have a good sense of assets and capacities, not just needs Leaders open doors Citizens are involved People take responsibility
  27. 27. The Three Acts of ABCD
  28. 28. How do you engage people to share their gifts? Focus on the gifts of their Heart
  29. 29. The Roles of Residents in Building a Stronger Community
  30. 30. “Unfortunately, many leaders and even some neighbors think that the idea of a strong local community is sort of “nice,” a good thing if you have the spare time, but not really important, vital or necessary. However, we know strong communities are vital and productive. But, above all they are necessary because of the inherent limitations of all institutions.” Why Community Matters: The Limitations of Institutions John McKnight, July 8, 2009
  31. 31. What Only Individuals Can Do:  Primary source of our health  Safety and security  The future of our earth – the environment  Build a resilient economy  Raise our children  Provide care
  32. 32. Determinants of a Healthy Community  Personal Behaviors – what we eat, how much we drink, whether we smoke, whether we exercise . . .  Social Relationships – how much time we spend with friends, family, community . . .  Physical Environment – where we live, the quality of the housing, streets, and parks, what’s in the air . . .  Economic Environment – availability of jobs, level of income of residents, commercial and retail opportunities . . .  Access to medical care – can we get help when we need it . . . 17
  33. 33. County Health Rankings
  34. 34. What Only Individuals Can Do:  Primary source of our health  Safety and security  The future of our earth – the environment  Build a resilient economy  Raise our children  Provide care
  35. 35. Healthy communities Require both Care and Service Place-based strategies unlock the power of care
  36. 36. The Path of Residents People as recipients of service
  37. 37. Rural Area in Upstate New York - Example Population 5,041, scattered across three small towns and a large rural area
  38. 38. “Our Town Rocks” has helped our community move from a sense of “down on our luck” to a sense of hopefulness.” D. Anderson “Grass roots, ground- breaking public health at its best.” H. Hoffman
  39. 39. Asset Mapping – Discover-Ask- Connect – From Mapping to Mobilizing
  40. 40. Asset Mapping Exercise 1. Get Paper and Markers 2. Pick a Neighborhood or Area 3. Draw the area (key streets) 4. Plot the Assets
  41. 41. Asset Mapping  Not just another list of resources  It is:  A strategy to identify assets that are available from within the community  A process for connecting and engaging the community and using the talents of people to help solve problems and build a better community
  42. 42. Through asset mapping, community residents move from:
  43. 43. Needs Map: Community Unemployment Housing Projects Poverty Uninsured Illiteracy Child Abuse Truancy Crime Teen Mothers Gang Members Mentally Ill School DropoutsHomeless Delinquency Addiction
  44. 44. Consequences of the Power of the Needs Map  Internalizations of the “deficiencies” identified by local residents  Destruction of social capital  Reinforcement of narrow categorical funding flows  Direction of funds toward professional helpers, not residents  Focus on “leaders” who magnify deficiencies  Rewards failure, produces dependency  Creates hopelessness
  45. 45. The Asset Map: Community Gifts of Individuals Citizens’ Associations Local Institutions Skills Youth Artists Labeled People Seniors Churches Block Clubs CulturalGroups Businesses Schools Parks LibrariesHospitals AthleticGroups
  46. 46. Consequences of Asset Mapping  Shift in Power!!!  Inclusiveness – all people have gifts and talents  Relationship building  People, not programs build power in a community  Welcoming the stranger  Learning community atmosphere  Place based  Cooperative orientation
  47. 47. Asset Mapping Steps  Create a Resident Leadership Team  Select the geographic area for action  Draw first Asset Map  Identify individual residents’ gifts and passions  Draw second Asset Map  Connect people with the same passions to act collectively  Celebrate
  48. 48. Step 1: Create a Resident Leadership Team  Widen the circle  Create leadership  Look for people that have a passion for their community  Look for connectors  Use associations to identify leaders  Look for people with a passion for meetings
  49. 49. Step 2: Select the geographic area for action  An Area the Resident Leadership Team calls home – they all live there  An Area they are willing to be responsible for  An Area large enough for critical mass…small enough to facilitate resident engagement
  50. 50. ChurchChurch ChurchChurch ChurchChurch SchoolSchool SchoolSchool AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency StoreStore StoreStore SNAP Office SNAP Office Step 3: Draw first Neighborhood Asset Map Where are assets of the residents? Where are assets of the residents?
  51. 51. Step 4: Identify individual resident’s gifts and passions  Create Questionnaire  Develop strategy to interview residents  Never interview someone you do not know  Do not just hand the questionnaires out or use the internet  Conduct Porch Time - Learning Conversations
  52. 52. NEIGHBORS THAT CARE Name:________________________________________________ Phone:________________________________________________ Address:______________________________________________ Email:________________________________________________ Occupation:____________________________________________ What are your gifts, skills, or abilities that you are willing to share? (Examples: child care, reading, computers, gardening, singing, listening, praying, cooking, teaching, caring for the sick, sewing, auto/home repair, construction, etc.) __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What do you care about? (Examples: children issues, family, environment, teenagers, seniors, teenage pregnancy rates, domestic violence issues, personal safety, education, widows/widowers) __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ What associations do you belong to? (Example: church, organizations, support groups, women and men’s groups, etc.) __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ Who else do you know in the Neighborhood? Would you be willing to interview them? __________________________________________________________
  53. 53. Step 5: Map Resident Gifts and Passions  Get a map that will enable actual address mapping  Map individuals on the map – actual addresses  Map by passions, not gifts  Group by passions
  54. 54. Group and Map by Passions Colored Sticky Dots = Children and Youth = Seniors = Hunger = Crime and Safety
  55. 55. ChurchChurch ChurchChurch ChurchChurch SchoolSchool SchoolSchool AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency StoreStore StoreStore SNAP Office SNAP Office Asset Mapping – a Neighborhood The Action Map
  56. 56. ChurchChurch ChurchChurch ChurchChurch SchoolSchool SchoolSchool AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency AgencyAgency StoreStore StoreStore SNAP Office SNAP Office Step 6: Connect people with the same passions to act collectively
  57. 57. Step 7: Celebrate Make it fun and take time to celebrate small successes.
  58. 58. THE NEW ROLE OF INSTITUTIONS – HOW INSTITUTIONS CAN USE ALL THEIR ASSETS TO BUILD STRONGER COMMUNITIES AND FAMILIES Businesses Government Agencies
  59. 59. Building healthy communities requires agencies to. . Change their thinking from Siloed Thinking to Holistic Approaches
  60. 60. From Starting with Needs To Starting with Strengths
  61. 61. From Top-Down To Community-Driven
  62. 62. INSTITUTIONS SHOULD LEAD BY STEPPING BACK TO CREATE SPACE FOR CITIZEN AND COMMUNITY ACTION
  63. 63. The role of agencies and programs should not be to just provide services to meet client needs The most effective role we can play is to work to remove barriers so that people have the opportunity to share their gifts and be a producer of their own and their community’s well-being Today’s Human Service Role
  64. 64. Institutional Assets More than an Institution’s Products or Services “A neighborhood may not need an agency’s hours of counseling, what they need is the agency’s copy machine or meeting room or their staff’s computer experience.” “Ask the neighborhood what they need…do not just tell them what services you offer.” “Never do anything that nobody wants”
  65. 65. Tools for Agencies - Leading By Stepping Back
  66. 66. Five Strategic Questions: 1. What functions could community people perform by themselves? 2. What functions can people achieve with some additional help from institutions? 3. What functions must institutions perform on their own? 4. What can we stop doing to create space for resident action? 5. What can we offer to the community beyond the services we deliver to support resident action? The answers become the basis for community engagement strategy development
  67. 67. What Can We Stop Doing Exercise Think about the services your agency offers and make a list of the activities that you could stop doing…because people can do them themselves.
  68. 68. What can residents do by themselves for themselves? -- Examples • Parents and other caregivers use everyday moments to encourage early learning • Breastfeeding support group is started in the neighborhood • Men in the neighborhood come together to tell their friends “Real Men do not hit their wives/girlfriends” • Neighbors routinely clear snow and ice from steps and walks of elderly residents • Friends don’t let friends drive drunk
  69. 69. What functions can people achieve with some additional help from institutions? -- Examples • Businesses make time and space available for financial literacy seminars • Service providers have staff and materials appropriate to clients’ language and culture • Faith groups provide vans to transport low-income citizens to prenatal and immunization services • Pizza parlors serve as drop-off sites for ongoing books-for-children program • Civic groups work with 2-1-1 to develop year-long volunteer projects related to a pressing community issue • Domestic violence agency provides training on safety planning to the local women’s quilting group
  70. 70. What do residents need done that they can’t do? -- Examples • The human services system engages all service providers in connecting low-income families with services and supports to grow family assets • Public, private, and nonprofit sectors join to develop a coordinated community crisis response system • The juvenile court system helps prevent drop-outs by treating truancy as a serious offense • The school board and dental association collaborate to operate dental clinics in schools • Low-cost health clinics offer prenatal services to expectant mothers • Domestic violence shelter provides a safe location for women fleeing an unsafe home.
  71. 71. Build Community Capacity:  Offer leadership training  Assist with outreach tools like translation  Work with associations of all types  Provide forums for networking  Offer non-meeting options for engagement  Share stories of successful communities  Highlight community strengths  Move beyond citizen participation to community empowerment
  72. 72. First, Do No Harm:  Don’t distract the community from its own priorities.  Don’t force the community into the bureaucracy’s silos.  Don’t take people’s time without showing results.  Don’t make the community dependent.  Never do for people what they can do for themselves.
  73. 73. Assessing Your Organization  What is your organization’s relationship to community residents? How accountable is your organization to the people and community it serves?  How does your work foster communication and relationship-building among the people you serve and residents in your community?  How does your service define and engage constituents? What power do they have? Are they seen as resources and co-producers?  How does your service strengthen community relationships and social capital?  How are you identifying other assets/resources your organization has to offer to the community and the people you serve?
  74. 74. Resources for Organizations Discovering Community Power: A Guide to Mobilizing Local Assets and Your Organization's Capacity http://www.abcdinstitute.org/docs/kelloggabcd.pdf
  75. 75. Sample: Agency Assets Profile
  76. 76. Agency Assets Profile
  77. 77. A tool to illustrate partnerships that your organization already has with institutions or associations in your community and to think about new partnerships which might be useful to your organization.
  78. 78. 10 LESSONS from Broadway United Methodist Church – Indianapolis, IN 1. Begin with what’s already there--and use it. 2. Involve yourself in what others are doing (not the other way around) 3. Stop doing what’s not working. 4. Act human. 5. Go to the people seen as broken and ask for their help.
  79. 79. 10 LESSONS from Broadway United Methodist Church – (cont.) 6. Know that change is slow. 7. There will be drama. There is also forgiveness. 8. Recognize that everyone has the capacity to discover gifts and build community. 9. Celebrate constantly. 10. INVITE, INVITE, INVITE!
  80. 80. Twelve Guiding Principles for Successful Place– Based Community Collective Impact  People, Places and Results Matter  Everyone has gifts, something to contribute  Relationships build a community  A citizen centered organization is the key to community engagement  Leaders involve others as active members of the community  Everyone cares about something  What they care about is their motivation to act  Listening conversations to Discover, Ask and Connect  Asking questions rather than giving answers invites stronger participation  We need both care and service  Institutions have reached their limits in problem-solving  Institutions as servants
  81. 81. Lessons Learned from a Collective Impact Perspective  It can not be overstated that the long term success and sustainability of our work is dependent on strong active citizen involvement. The work of agencies and other institutions is to build strong communities through citizen involvement. It is the community’s work to solve problems.  We must develop and support effective citizen engagement and empowerment, helping all residents identify and share their “gifts”.  It is not just about money. It is not about funding, grants and allocations it is about strategically leveraging individual, neighborhood and community resources.  No one institution or group can solve today’s problems alone, we must all work together.
  82. 82. Bill Moyers Journal America Bracho http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=MEqdNOo9SDY
  83. 83. ABCD Tools A  Community Building Principles and Action Steps Chart – A quick guide to the principles of ABCD community building and how to put the principles into action for greater impact. B  The New Paradigm – A chart that explains the differences between a Needs Based approach and an Asset Based approach to solving problems. C  Creating Space for Resident Action – A planning tool to help an organization begin to create space for increased resident engagement and action. D  Three Questions for Effective Strategy Development – A tool to help guide your organization´s strategic planning to increase resident engagement. E  Asset Mapping Eight Steps to Increase Resident Engagement — Tips on how to support ABCD based neighborhood organizing. F  Porch Time – Learning Conversations, tips on how to connect and talk with neighborhood residents to identify their gifts and passions. G  Tips for Working with Neighborhoods – A chart on the difference between how we work with institutions and how to work with neighborhoods. H  Gifts Discovery Activity (short version) – The purpose of this exercise is to demonstrate the wide variety of resources we have available to address an issue, beyond the services agencies offer. I  Gifts Discovery Activity (long version) – This exercise is a powerful way to start a meeting and demonstrate the power of resources (gifts) in the room that are available to address the issue or issues identified for action. www.hdanielsduncanconsulting.org
  84. 84. ABCD Toolkit http://hdanielsduncanconsulting.org/ Resources - ABCD ABCD Institute – Order Publications http://www.abcdinstitute.org/ Online ABCD Community http://abcdinaction.ning.com/ http://www.abundantcommunity.com/
  85. 85. H. Daniels Duncan Faculty Member Asset Based Community Development Institute 512.788.8646 dan@hddabcd.org Asset Based Community Development Thank You!

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