...
          Mainframe Performance Management: Can Make the Dinosaur Dance© 2010, HCL Technologies Ltd. October, 2010      Ma...
 Contents Introduction ......................................................................................................
Introduction There was a time when IT folks could show value by focusing only on operational performance. Today, however, ...
zEnterprise system (z196)‐‐latest mainframe model from IBM‐‐is targeted at the top 10% to 20% of its customers where the v...
running  on  the  mainframe  which  are  invoked  from  the  Web.  Additionally,  there  are  queries  that  are used for ...
HCL Approach As  illustrated  in  Figure  1,  HCL  uses  its  proprietary  framework  for  workload  optimization  to  hel...
                                                                                                Data                      ...
        For identifying design and architecture problems, HCL               Understands the pain points in the application...
Benefits The  overall  business  benefits  that  clients  have  enjoyed  from  an  improvement  in  the  performance  of m...
 German Financial Services Provider with Global OperationsArea of Engagement                             Solution         ...
                                                                Endnotes                                                  ...
                                                                                                                          ...
                                                                                                                          ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

HCLT Research Paper: Mainframe Performance Management

2,520 views

Published on

http://www.hcltech.com/custom-application-services/overview~ Custom Application Services~

The mainframe story would be incomplete without its customers. Although some customers are on the look out to reduce dependency on mainframes by moving to systems powered by newer echnologies, many still continue to use them for historical reasons. Mainframe customers are big companies in data‐ intensive industries such as distribution, financial services, general business, and public sector that invested in mainframes several years ago

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,520
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
24
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

HCLT Research Paper: Mainframe Performance Management

  1. 1.           Mainframe Performance Management  Can Make the Dinosaur Dance            AUTHORS             Srinivas Murthy Potharaju, ETS Mainframe CoE             HCL Technologies, Hyderabad              Dr Usha Thakur, ATS Technical Research             HCL Technologies, Chennai 
  2. 2.        Mainframe Performance Management: Can Make the Dinosaur Dance© 2010, HCL Technologies Ltd. October, 2010    Mainframe Performance Management      2   
  3. 3.  Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 4 Purpose ......................................................................................................................................................... 4 Significance of Mainframes ........................................................................................................................... 4 Drivers for Mainframe Performance............................................................................................................. 5 Mainframe Performance Services from HCL................................................................................................. 6  HCL Approach  ........................................................................................................................................... 7  .Benefits ....................................................................................................................................................... 10 Endnotes ..................................................................................................................................................... 12   Mainframe Performance Management      3  
  4. 4. Introduction There was a time when IT folks could show value by focusing only on operational performance. Today, however,  the  focus  has  shifted  more  to  showing  the  extent  to  which  IT  products  and  services  create value  and  contribute  to  their  organization’s  business  objectives.  Businesses  want  to  know  how  IT  can help  in  expanding  their  company’s  customer  base,  increasing  products  and  services  portfolios, increasing the profit margin, tapping into new markets, identifying activities for outsourcing, and much more. The alignment of IT activities and deliverables to business goals gains even more significance in the world of mainframes, given the high investments associated with them.  It is no longer enough to show mainframe performance metrics only in terms of operational efficiency; we need metrics that can reflect the extent to which mainframes help their organization fulfil business goals. That this is not just a fad is very clear from a study undertaken recently by Gartner and Financial Executives International (FEI). According to that study a fairly high number of CIOs are already reporting to CFOs, and the latter have a significant say in all IT investment matters. 1 Purpose The audience of this paper are CIOs, CEOs, CFOs, and other executives whose business operations are heavily  dependent  upon  the  performance  of  mainframes.  It  examines  the  main  drivers  for  mainframe performance management by organizations that have decided to continue using them. This paper also highlights key features of the performance management service from HCL. 2 Significance of Mainframes Throughout  the  history  of  the  mainframe,  IBM  has  retained  its  dominance, 3   though  not  without  its share of controversy. 4  It is estimated that IBM’s mainframe sales will reach $3.3 billion in 2010, which would represent about three‐quarters of the overall mainframe market of $4.5 billion. 5   For sometime now, there has been a popular belief that mainframes are living on borrowed time and may  not  be  around  in  the  near  future.  Writing  in  2003,  John  R.  Phelps  of  Gartner  pointed  out  that  a number of developments over the past 15 years 6  led to stories about the death of the IBM mainframe, but  the  reality  has  been  to  the  contrary.  Currently,  a  great  deal  of  attention  is  being  given  to  the declining revenue from mainframes and servers in general, 7  and once again we are seeing stories about the end of mainframes in the very near future. What is interesting, however, is that IBM has continued to  modernize  and  invest  in  a  range  of  mainframes,  improve  pricing,  and  reach  out  to  new  customers, especially in newly industrializing economies, 8  which indicates that IBM still has confidence in continued business  from  mainframes.  In  fact,  IBM  is  solidifying  its  position  in  niche  accounts.  For  instance,  the  Mainframe Performance Management      4  
  5. 5. zEnterprise system (z196)‐‐latest mainframe model from IBM‐‐is targeted at the top 10% to 20% of its customers where the volume of Millions of Instructions Per Second (MIPS) is very high. 9  MIPS is one of the most important criterion that IBM uses for calculating the cost of mainframe license. 10   The mainframe story would be incomplete without its customers. Although some customers are on the look out to reduce dependency on mainframes by moving to systems powered by newer technologies, many still continue to use them for historical reasons. Mainframe customers are big companies in data‐intensive  industries  such  as  distribution,  financial  services,  general  business,  and  public  sector  that invested  in  mainframes  several  years  ago.  For  these  customers,  reliability,  security,  and  scalability  are top priorities. 11  There is a general consensus that any improvement in the end‐to‐end performance of mainframes is a very important step in bringing down the cost of owning and running mainframes. Drivers for Mainframe Performance In general, the main business drivers for improving the performance of mainframes are as follows:  Reduce  the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of mainframe servers  Increase productivity   Make the online applications available 24/7 to an increasing number of customers without any  delay 12  Improve end‐user experience e.g., comparing auto insurance quotes 13  and the like transactions  Increase customer retention 14    Eliminate SLA violation  Assuming  that  IT  is  a  means  for  achieving  the  business  objectives  then  it  is  imperative  for  IT management and staff to be on the same page as the business management and staff in their company. This will not only give all IT activities and decisions a business context but also reveal their significance and impact on business.  The  changing  business  environment  today  is  compelling  IT  management  to  look  at  ways  of  obtaining maximum performance from the core mainframe applications and of aligning applications directly to the overall business objectives of their organization. The bulk of the mainframe applications were developed years ago, which have since then undergone enhancements or patchwork. Consequently, they have lost maintainability and traceability to business requirements.  Today, more  than ever before, there is an ever  changing workload being executed on  the mainframe. Starting  with  traditional  batch  and  online  workloads,  there  is  an  increasing  number  of  transactions  Mainframe Performance Management      5  
  6. 6. running  on  the  mainframe  which  are  invoked  from  the  Web.  Additionally,  there  are  queries  that  are used for complex reporting and analytics in Data Warehouse & Business Intelligence environments. Poor mainframe performance may be caused by all or a combination of the following problems:  Environment, system and sub‐system parameters are not set correctly   Aging  and  monolithic  applications  are  large  and  complex,  and  therefore  difficult  to  integrate  with modern systems, which are distributed and agile  Database parameters are not tuned for optimal performance   Applications and databases are poorly designed  Application code and SQLs are not tuned for performance   Online applications may not be available due to the scheduling of jobs in critical path and end‐ of‐day batch jobs  File block size and buffer parameters are not set correctly, leading to prolonged and high usage  of CPU and I/O   The above‐mentioned technical problems need to be addressed by IT teams, given that if they are left unattended they will most likely lead to the following undesirable consequences:  Higher licensing cost of mainframes resulting from a high consumption of MIPS by applications  Increasing  customer  dissatisfaction  and  decline  in  customer  because  of  poor  response  time  of  online applications  Lower  productivity  of  day  time  employees  caused  by  extended  batch  windows  cutting  into  regular business hours    SLA violations due to the inability of applications to scale up to increasing data volumes Mainframe Performance Services from HCL This  is  a  comprehensive  service  from  HCL.  Using  proven  methodologies  and  frameworks,  it  identifies poorly designed processes, programs, databases, and environment on the mainframe. On the basis of its findings,  HCL  proposes  a  solution  and  remedial  strategy.  During  implementation,  HCL  enhances  the configuration  of  the  mainframe  processes,  programs,  databases,  and  services  such  that  the  overall response  and  execution  time  is  faster  than  before.  Customers  who  have  availed  of  this  service  have been  able  to  reduce  MIPS  usage  by  their  applications,  lower  TCO,  and  utilize  the  available  processing capacity for newer workloads.  Mainframe Performance Management      6  
  7. 7. HCL Approach As  illustrated  in  Figure  1,  HCL  uses  its  proprietary  framework  for  workload  optimization  to  help customers  analyze  their  workload  and  identify  areas  of  application  tuning.  This  approach  takes  into account  inputs  on  the  architecture  of  business  applications  and  databases,  the  design  of  online  and batch  components,  and  also  usage/runtime  statistics  (from  SMF  &  RMF,  performance  management tools, history reports, and environment as well system/ subsystem parameters).              Figure 1: HCL Proprietary Framework As  highlighted  below,  the  objective  of  the  assessment  approach  adopted  by  HCL  is  to  identify  poorly performing  workloads  on  the  mainframe  so  that  appropriate  recommendations  could  be  made  and  a remedial strategy developed. PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION ASSESSMENT APPROACH  As  shown  in  Figure  2,  HCL  first  collects  data  on  various  parameters  from  the  client  systems  and subsystems. It analyzes that data and then proposes a solution, together with a remedial strategy.  Mainframe Performance Management      7  
  8. 8.             Data  Analysis Propose  Remediate  Collection  Solutions  Analyze usage  Identify areas of  Make  Construct high level designs  and runtime  performance  recommendations to  for each approved   data from SMF  improvement  optimize performance  recommendation.   of the workload.  and RMF to  using   identify the    Conduct baseline  performance  Estimate cost, effort  most expensive  tools, history  performance of the code  and duration required   workloads   reports, and  for implementing  (production version) in  application  proposed  controlled test region.   architecture  recommendations     diagrams   aimed at optimizing  Carry out functional and   performance.  performance tests of    impacted components in  Prepare Gain Vs Effort   matrix to prioritize  controlled test environment.   each recommendation.      Compare results from  performance test,   implement agreed upon  recommendations, and    demonstrate benefits.        Provide warranty support  for impacted components.   Figure 2: Performance Optimization Execution Approach HCL  follows  a  systematic  approach  in  identifying  areas  of  improvement  in  mainframe  systems  and processes. Here is a glimpse of that approach.  In batch jobs, HCL   Examines the critical path in the batch cycle in order to identify undue waiting times  Identifies the most expensive batch jobs, programs, utilities, and recurring job failures   Analyzes performance data reports for selected jobs  In online transactions, HCL    Identifies the most expensive online transactions and recurring failure events  Analyzes performance data reports for selected transactions  Mainframe Performance Management      8  
  9. 9.   For identifying design and architecture problems, HCL     Understands the pain points in the application architecture  Locates the precise problems in the design of databases and external interfaces   Analyzes performance data reports for selected jobs and transactions  For identifying specific problems in the database, HCL  Examines contentious issues  Considers or reconsider data compression  Considers if appropriate Indexes are being used by the query  Takes into account the possibility of reorganizing table spaces    Explores if partitioning and segmentation of table spaces would be appropriate  For isolating problems at the system and subsystem levels, HCL  Analyzes performance data reports for z/OS, CICS, DB2 and IMS systems   Analyzes all system and subsystem parameters   Examines Buffer Pool, Sort Pool, EDM Pool, and DB2 Catalog PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT BEST PRACTICES HCL uses a set of performance management best practices that enable it to:  Identify  early  signs  of  performance  problems  by  using  performance  tools  and  system  related performance reports.   Automate  real‐time  problem  detection  and  resolution  by  putting  in  place  performance  indicators and thresholds.  Prevent  the  occurrence  of  problems  by  using  the  SMF  and  RMF  data  reports  to  allocate  workload  resources  based  on  performance.  Historically,  the  stellar  reputation  earned  by  mainframes  (for  executing  high  performance  operations  continuously)  has  come,  in  part,  from the fact that engineers have been able to allocate system resources proactively. This  proactive  allocation  was  not  a  problem  when  mainframe  systems  were  siloed,  software  changes were relatively infrequent, and workloads were predictable.  Mainframe Performance Management      9  
  10. 10. Benefits The  overall  business  benefits  that  clients  have  enjoyed  from  an  improvement  in  the  performance  of mainframes  are lower TCO and increased productivity. However, as illustrated in Table 1 and  Table 2, there are other specific advantages as well. US‐based Auto & Home Insurance CompanyArea of Engagement    Solution Customer BenefitsPerformance Optimization of  SQL query tuning ‐ overall  Reduced TCO applications in scope  60% gain in performance  Enhanced cost Business Objectives  Response time  effectiveness Improve the performance of the  improvement ‐ overall  73% faster views  Reduced technology product in production and  risk recommend improvements in  New indexes to improve consumption, response time,  Optimized business  performance database improvements,  functions and their architecture, WLM, etc before its  Data model redesign  mapping to system Phase 2 development.  improvements  landscape  Technology  WLM goal mode policy  Improved global Mainframe Technology (REXX,  recommendations ‐  visibility of DB2 V7, ISPF Services, JCL,  performance gain of  applications and OMEGAMON for DB2 & other  around 20%  projects technologies)  All small jobs now run  Reduced time to take   under a minute as  decisions for new Engagement Model/Size  compared to 5 – 60  initiatives Onsite (30%) – Offshore (70%)  minutes earlier Project Duration 4 months  Table 1: Performance Optimization – US Client      Mainframe Performance Management      10  
  11. 11.  German Financial Services Provider with Global OperationsArea of Engagement    Solution Customer BenefitsPerformance Optimization of  Expected Optimization  Reduced TCO applications in scope  Addressed CPU  Easily manageable Business Objectives  consumption – ~ 30,000  CPU Hours  Define a formal IT Provide performance  governance optimization recommendations for applications, SQL tuning,  Expected optimization for  HCLTs recommendations  Enhanced cost related sub system and related areas  – Average ~ 15%  effectiveness Technology  Reduced Technology  Optimization Recommendations Mainframe Technology (COBOL,  risk DB2, CICS, JCL, DB2 PM,  SQL query tuning (100+ OMEGAMON for DB2 & other  recommendations)  Optimized business technologies)  functions and their Engagement Model/Size  New and modified  mapping to system Onsite (10%) – Offshore (90%)  Indexes to improve  landscape  performance Project Duration  Improved global 4 months  Application code  visibility of  performance  applications and  improvements  projects  Architecture &  Reduced time to take  application redesign  decisions for new  initiatives    Table 2: Performance Optimization – German Client     Mainframe Performance Management      11  
  12. 12.   Endnotes                                                             1  One of the 50 questions that the research team asked 482 senior financial executives was: who did IT report to in their organization? The response was as follows: 42% reported to the CFO, 33% to the CEO, 16% to the COO, 2% to a chief administrative officer and 7% to other officers. For full details of the survey results and analysis, see John E. Van Decker, “2010 Gartner FEI Technology Study: The CFO as Technology Influencer" (9 April 2010 ID Number: G00175773) p. 2 http://my.gartner.com/portal/server.pt?open=512&objID=260&mode=2&PageID=3460702&id=1338722&ref=clientFriendlyUrl [October 2010]‐>represents when an URL was accessed. 2  Note: a discussion on the pros and cons of mainframe lies outside the scope of this paper. 3  IBM’s share of the market for mainframe is believed to be around 90%. Other mainframe vendors include Computer Associates, BEA, Microsoft, Hewlett‐Packard, Fujitsu Siemens, Unisys, Sun, and Micro Focus. 4  The latest being antitrust complaints by TurboHercules, a French maker of open‐source software for mainframe computers, and T3 Technologies, an American distributor of Flex software that runs mainframes files. On the basis of those complaints, the European Commission has opened an investigation against IBM. For details, see Kevin J. OBrien, "Europe to Investigate Antitrust Complaints over I.B.M. Mainframes" (July 26, 2010) http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/27/business/27blue.html [October 2010]. See also "Antitrust: Commission Initiates Formal Investigations against IBM in Two Cases of Suspected Abuse of Dominant Market Position" (July 26, 2010; Ref.: IP/10/1006) http://europa.eu/rapid/pressReleasesAction.do?reference=IP/10/1006&format=HTML&aged=0&language=EN&guiLanguage=en [October 2010]. See also "NEON Files Motion for Partial Summary Judgment in NEON v. IBM" (September 15, 2010) http://www.marketwatch.com/story/neon‐files‐motion‐for‐partial‐summary‐judgment‐in‐neon‐v‐ibm‐2010‐09‐15?reflink=MW_news_stmp [October 2010]. Similar concerns have been expressed in a comprehensive study by the Indian Council for Research and International Economic Relations. For details, see Rajat Kathuria, et al., "The Issues of Competition in Mainframe and Associated Services in India" (March 11, 2010) http://openmainframe.org/featured‐articles/the‐issues‐of‐competition‐in‐mainframe‐and‐associated‐servic.html [October 2010]. 5  Kevin J. OBrien, Ibid. According to Toni Sacconaghi of Bernstein Research, nearly 40% of IBM’s profits are mainframe‐related. Cited in “The Return of the mainframe Back in Fashion” (January 14, 2010) http://www.economist.com/node/15276714?story_id=15276714&source=hptextfeature [October 2010]. 6  He is referring in particular to the movement toward client/server platforms and complementary metal‐oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology combined with the availability, reliability, security, scalability, and manageability of mainframes, the growth of the Internet and e‐business, and the Y2K problem, all of which led many to believe that the mainframe was living on borrowed time. For details, see John R. Phelps, “The Future of Mainframes Looks Surprisingly Good,” (August/September 2003 issue of zJournal, now a part of mainframezone) http://www.mainframezone.com/it‐management/gartner‐cio‐update‐future‐of‐theibm‐mainframe‐the‐looks‐surprisingly‐good [October 2010].  Mainframe Performance Management      12  
  13. 13.                                                                                                                                                                                                  7  According to IDC, the worldwide server revenue in 2009 was said to have declined 18.9% to $43.2 billion when compared to 2008, and worldwide unit shipments declined 18.6% to 6.6 million units over the same period. For details, see IDC, "Worldwide Server Market Rebounds Sharply in Fourth Quarter as Demand for Blades and x86 Systems Leads the Way" (24 Feb 2010) http://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=prUS22224510 [October 2010]. According to one estimate, IBM’s mainframe revenue took a plunge of 39% in the second quarter of 2009. See Steve Hamm, "IBM Defends Its Big Iron" (August 4, 2009) http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/aug2009/tc2009084_001429.htm [October 2010]. 8  There are several articles on this subjects. See, for instance, Zacks Investment Research, "IBM’s Mainframe Wins Customer" (June 30, 2010) http://www.zacks.com/stock/news/36260/Zacks+Analyst+Blog+Highlights%3A+Union+Pacific%2C+IBM%2C+Hewlett+Packard%2C+Vornado+Realty+and+KKR+Financial [October 2010]. See also Robert L. Mitchell, ""Morphing the mainframe" (February 6, 2006) http://features.techworld.com/operating‐systems/2229/morphing‐the‐mainframe/ [October 2010]. 9  The zEnterprise systems is said to start at about $1 million and according to Lou Miscioscia, an analyst with Collins Stewart, they are expected to generate a profit margin of about 70 percent, vs. a 46 percent margin for the company as a whole. Cited in By Katie Hoffman, "IBM Mainframes: Boring but Profitable" (July 22, 2010) http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/10_31/b4189041885991.htm [October 2010]. See also IBM, "IBM zEnterprise System," http://www‐03.ibm.com/systems/z/hardware/zenterprise/ and also "Success Stories," http://www‐03.ibm.com/systems/z/success/index.html [October 2010]. According to Martin Kennedy, the managing director of Citigroups enterprise systems infrastructure, "we will be able to collapse multiple existing large systems into the new water‐cooled z196, which is a huge step in the companys attempt to shift more of its IT dollars away from internal operations and maintenance and toward customer‐facing efforts. For more details, see Bob Evans, "Global CIO: IBMs Blazing New Mainframe Wins Raves from Citigroup," (September 2, 2010) http://www.informationweek.com/news/global‐cio/interviews/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=227200199&pgno=2&queryText=&isPrev= [October 2010]. See also John R. Phelps and Mike Chuba, "IBM Adds Integrated Management Role for Mainframe," July 27, 2010; ID: G00205553) http://my.gartner.com/portal/server.pt?open=512&objID=260&mode=2&PageID=3460702&resId=1411013&ref=QuickSearch&sthkw=mainframe [October 2010]. 10  MIPS reflect the mainframe’s footprint, and over the past decade it has witnessed a steady rise with installed capacity reaching a high of 11.1 million in 2007. For details, see Timothy Prickett Morgan, "The IBM Mainframe Base: Alive and Kicking" (July 10, 2007) http://www.itjungle.com/big/big071007‐story01.html [October 2007]. 11  For a quick overview on this aspect, see IBM, "The IBM Enterprise System Advantage ‐ Running the Worlds Most Sophisticated Business Transactions," http://www‐03.ibm.com/systems/migratetoibm/getthefacts/market.html [October 2010]. See also Anne Rawland Gabriel, "Debate over the Future of Mainframe Computing Rages On" (September 16, 2008) http://www.wallstreetandtech.com/it‐infrastructure/210601591?pgno=1 [October 2010]. 12  For instance, in the future banks need to accommodate for the increasing number of customers accessing mobile banking application. According to a study by Berg Insight, "the number of active users of mobile banking and related financial services worldwide is forecasted to increase from 20 million in 2008 to 913 million in 2014."  Mainframe Performance Management      13  
  14. 14.                                                                                                                                                                                                  Berg Insight, "Mobile Banking and Payments," p. 3, http://www.berginsight.com/ReportPDF/ProductSheet/bi‐mbp‐ps.pdf [September 2010]. Anticipating such high volume, IBM has developed a 5.2GHz chip ‐ considered to be the highest speed rating to date ‐ for its fastest mainframe computers. See Brooke Crothers, "IBM Ships 5.2GHz Chip, Its Fastest Yet" September 1, 2010) http://news.cnet.com/8301‐13924_3‐20015297‐64.html#ixzz10uOqdeX8 [September 2010]. 13  Ryan Arsenault’s observation captures the views of many experts thus: “[t]he problem is not the mainframe platform, but the fact that many insurance companies are making use of legacy mainframe application code which was originally designed to provide quotations to real people.” What is needed is an improvement in the performance of hardware and software applications that use computer resources for running a transaction such as generating insurance quotes. For details, see Ryan Arsenault, "Mainframes Run into Performance Problems with Online Insurance Comparison Shopping," http://itknowledgeexchange.techtarget.com/mainframe‐blog/mainframes‐run‐into‐performance‐problems‐with‐online‐insurance‐comparison‐shopping/ [September 2010.  14  Improving performance of business applications is a key to delivering business value to customers and their end‐users. A recent survey by the Aberdeen Group found that companies that monitored and measured application performance at the point of consumption by end users had few end user complaints. For full details of the survey, see Jeffrey Hill, “End‐User Experience Monitoring and Management” (August 2010) http://v1.aberdeen.com/launch/report/benchmark/6778‐RA‐end‐user‐experience‐monitoring.asp [October 2010]. Writing about the excessive significance given to operational performance metrics in the post 1990s era, Michael Bitterman noted that "IT continues to focus on operations and...explain ‘how the clock works’ when users are asking, ‘what time is it?’ The availability of tools for monitoring hardware and network performance [has given] IT the ability to overwhelm users with statistics regarding IT performance. Users [become] baffled by the metrics that show that mainframe availability was 99.99% yet they couldn’t enter data or access systems.” For the complete report, see Michael Bitterman "IT Metrics for the Information Age" (July 25, 2004) http://www.performance‐measurement.net/news‐detail.asp?nID=198 [October 2010].  Mainframe Performance Management      14  

×