Review:  Concepts 1-4 Training and Technical Assistance to Nonprofit Organizations
Agenda <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Review Problem Statement </li></ul><ul><li>Revie...
Concepts 1-4 Objectives <ul><li>Provide a review of the Problem Statement / Needs Assessment, Objectives, Program Plan and...
Problem Statement Overview <ul><li>The purpose of the Problem Statement is to show why the proposed program is needed – to...
Ten Data Collection Tips <ul><li>Look at data from the US Census Bureau First </li></ul><ul><li>Look at State and Local Da...
Limited Data - Solutions <ul><li>Use  surrogate  data (data on other risky behaviors)  http://www.samhsa.gov/   http://www...
Criteria for Writing Objectives <ul><li>To be really useful, program objectives should: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell  who , ...
Process Objectives <ul><li>Process Objectives refer to the completion of specific, measurable tasks you plan to accomplish...
Outcome Objectives <ul><li>Outcome Objectives refer to specific, measurable benefits to consumers as a result of participa...
Program Plan Overview <ul><li>This section may also be called the ‘work plan’ </li></ul><ul><li>It should flow directly fr...
USCM says to Include: <ul><li>Program Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Description of Interventions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Type o...
Tips on Writing Program Plans <ul><li>Remembering from Process Objectives who, is going to do what, when, how much... </li...
Example 10 per night 15 per day 8pm to midnight South Beach Gay Bars Family Planning Clinics 1p – 7p 4 hours 6 hours 3 x p...
Evaluation Overview <ul><li>Most funding sources will require that your proposal contain an evaluation section.  Think of ...
Process Evaluation… <ul><li>…  examines the implementation of a project.  It documents what services were delivered, how t...
Outcome Evaluation… <ul><li>…  looks at the effects of a project </li></ul><ul><li>…  is used to determine whether any cha...
Exercise 4 Create an Evaluation Plan
Sample Participant Survey <ul><li>I understand the purpose of each of the proposal sections: Problem Statement, Objectives...
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Grant Writing: Summary Concepts 1 4

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This is a sample of training concepts related to grant or funding proposal development. You will note that it refers to HIV/AIDS services, although the concepts are universal. Customizable training of this type is currently offered in South Florida or Central Indiana. Courses are available in Strategic Planning, Board Orientation and Training, Program Development, Grant Writing and Evaluation. Courses may be introductory in nature or highly advanced resulting in completed projects.

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Grant Writing: Summary Concepts 1 4

  1. 1. Review: Concepts 1-4 Training and Technical Assistance to Nonprofit Organizations
  2. 2. Agenda <ul><li>Introductions </li></ul><ul><li>Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Review Problem Statement </li></ul><ul><li>Review Objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Review Program Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Review Intro to Evaluation </li></ul>
  3. 3. Concepts 1-4 Objectives <ul><li>Provide a review of the Problem Statement / Needs Assessment, Objectives, Program Plan and Evaluation sections of a funding proposal </li></ul><ul><li>Work with individual organizational representatives from nonprofit organizations in a small group setting </li></ul><ul><li>Answer remaining questions related to the concepts </li></ul>
  4. 4. Problem Statement Overview <ul><li>The purpose of the Problem Statement is to show why the proposed program is needed – to convince the reviewer, through supportive evidence and persuasive argument that a compelling problem exists in your community that can be addressed by your program. USMC TAR March 2003 page 4 </li></ul>
  5. 5. Ten Data Collection Tips <ul><li>Look at data from the US Census Bureau First </li></ul><ul><li>Look at State and Local Data Second </li></ul><ul><li>Use data that builds credibility with the funder </li></ul><ul><li>Use current data </li></ul><ul><li>Compare statistics from the same family of problems </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t call an agency for data until you have looked on the Internet first </li></ul><ul><li>Organize your findings </li></ul><ul><li>Look for free research reports and newsletters </li></ul><ul><li>Share data with others </li></ul><ul><li>Allocate time to search for ‘best practices’ regularly </li></ul><ul><li>Grant Writing for Dummies, Beverly A. Browning, 2001 Edition, Chapter 25 </li></ul>
  6. 6. Limited Data - Solutions <ul><li>Use surrogate data (data on other risky behaviors) http://www.samhsa.gov/ http://www.cdc.gov/brfss/index.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Collect your own data </li></ul><ul><li>Report your own data </li></ul><ul><li>Report anecdotal data (data and trends noticed by your outreach staff) </li></ul><ul><li>Cite [credible] studies and reports http: //jama . ama-assn .org/ http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/ </li></ul><ul><li>USCM HIV/AIDS Program, Tools for HIV Prevention, Technical Assistance Report, March 2003 </li></ul>
  7. 7. Criteria for Writing Objectives <ul><li>To be really useful, program objectives should: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tell who , </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Is going to do what , </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How Much and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How it will be measured </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Refer to section III. Program Objectives in Program Planning & Proposal Writing Expanded Version </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Process Objectives <ul><li>Process Objectives refer to the completion of specific, measurable tasks you plan to accomplish over the course of the program or grant. These are the easiest to write and measure. They usually begin with: </li></ul><ul><li>to provide… </li></ul><ul><li>to establish… </li></ul><ul><li>to create… </li></ul><ul><li>to complete… </li></ul><ul><li>to conduct… </li></ul><ul><li>They measure actions and do not describe the end results for your target population. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Outcome Objectives <ul><li>Outcome Objectives refer to specific, measurable benefits to consumers as a result of participating in your program. They measure changes in knowledge, skills or conditions and usually begin with: </li></ul><ul><li>to increase… </li></ul><ul><li>to decrease… </li></ul><ul><li>to reduce… </li></ul><ul><li>They are often confused with goal statements which are long-range, broad and imprecise. </li></ul>
  10. 10. Program Plan Overview <ul><li>This section may also be called the ‘work plan’ </li></ul><ul><li>It should flow directly from your goals and objectives </li></ul><ul><li>The format depends on the requirements of the funding source Writing Proposals for HIV/AIDS Prevention Grants (USCM) </li></ul><ul><li>Related terms include: methods, methodology, activities, procedures or strategies </li></ul><ul><li>The basic requirements of this section are clarity and justification Program Planning and Proposal Writing – The Grantsmanship Center, Inc. </li></ul>
  11. 11. USCM says to Include: <ul><li>Program Overview </li></ul><ul><li>Description of Interventions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Type of Intervention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information or skills to be delivered </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Positions assigned </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Frequency and duration </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Times and locations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Number expected to participate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recruitment and retention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Activities related to implementation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Linkages and referrals </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Time Line (see example page 27 in PP&PW) </li></ul><ul><li>Staffing – selection and training </li></ul><ul><li>Justification of Methods </li></ul>
  12. 12. Tips on Writing Program Plans <ul><li>Remembering from Process Objectives who, is going to do what, when, how much... </li></ul><ul><li>Remembering from Outcome Objectives whose knowledge, skills, beliefs or attitudes are impacted; what is being measured; how is it measured… </li></ul><ul><li>Activities = going to do what, what is measured and how is it measured </li></ul><ul><li>Selection of Activities = may have come from your problem statement, if not include it here i.e. selected intervention ‘x’ has shown to have desired outcome ‘y’ in the target population chosen as proven by researcher or publication or service provider ‘z’ </li></ul><ul><li>Sequence of Activities = this is simply putting your activities in a logical order, this is what will be used to establish a time line </li></ul><ul><li>Staffing = who – include qualifications, certifications and/or resume </li></ul><ul><li>Clients and Selection = whose knowledge, skills, beliefs or attitudes are to be impacted and how will you choose them – this is your program eligibility and your marketing strategy for getting them into the program </li></ul><ul><li>Justification = the why of it all </li></ul>
  13. 13. Example 10 per night 15 per day 8pm to midnight South Beach Gay Bars Family Planning Clinics 1p – 7p 4 hours 6 hours 3 x per Week 2 x per Week Street Outreach Workers Female Outreach Workers Ora Quick Ora Quick Testing Testing MSM Hetero Latina # Clients Time and Loc Dur Freq Staff (by) Model Info or Skills Type Activity/Intervention Street Outreach
  14. 14. Evaluation Overview <ul><li>Most funding sources will require that your proposal contain an evaluation section. Think of the evaluation as having two components. One evaluates the results of your program, i.e. outcome evaluation, while the other examines how you conduct the program, i.e. process evaluation . Other terms for ‘outcome evaluation’ may include: product evaluation, program evaluation, impact evaluation or summative evaluation. Program Planning and Proposal Writing – The Grantsmanship Center, Inc. </li></ul><ul><li>The purpose of the Evaluation Plan is to describe how you will assess the extent to which your project has met its goals and objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>More and more, funders want to know not only how a project was carried out ( process evaluation ) but also what effects it had on the clients ( outcome evaluation ). USCM Technical Assistance Reports, March 2003, Writing Proposals for HIV/AIDS Prevention Grants </li></ul>
  15. 15. Process Evaluation… <ul><li>… examines the implementation of a project. It documents what services were delivered, how they were delivered and who received them. </li></ul><ul><li>… is generally easier to conduct because it relies on information that is fairly easy to obtain, frequently already exits and can be built into regular project activities – in many cases, you can use exiting forms that have been successfully used by your own or other organizations </li></ul>
  16. 16. Outcome Evaluation… <ul><li>… looks at the effects of a project </li></ul><ul><li>… is used to determine whether any changes occurred in the target population as a result of the project </li></ul><ul><li>… conducted by community-based organizations [usually] focus on short-term effects </li></ul>
  17. 17. Exercise 4 Create an Evaluation Plan
  18. 18. Sample Participant Survey <ul><li>I understand the purpose of each of the proposal sections: Problem Statement, Objectives, Program Plan and Evaluation </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>I received individual attention within the small group </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>I was able to clarify any remaining questions I had pertaining to the proposal sections: Problem Statement, Objectives, Program Plan and Evaluation. </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The reference materials were organized and useful </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>The instructor was prepared and effective </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Yes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>No </li></ul></ul></ul>

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