Digilit strategic paper for ALT-C12

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Paper on strategic approaches to developing digital literacy presented to ALT-C 2012 as a short paper, on behalf of the JISC Developing Digital Literacies programme

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  • This morning we have created some ideal digital learners, with the skills and practices necessary for them to study in college or university, and go into the workplace (and life) with a set of attributes which enable them to be confident, advanced users of technology.
    How close are our learners to this ‘ideal’ digitally literate graduate? How far have they got to travel? What aspects of their development do we as their educators need to focus on?
    Well, we know some of this already – from learner experience research funded by JISC and others…
    But, there is likely to still be some things you don’t know, perhaps because your particular learners are different, or because learners are changing so fast that the research is quickly becoming out of date.
    So this next section of the workshop is about these two things…
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • However, beyond these expectations of service provision, and despite using technology extensively in their social and leisure lives, most learners do not have clear
    ideas of how courses could be using technology in educational and innovative ways.
    In the main they still rely to a great extent on their institutions, course pedagogies and tutors for guidance and direction.
    Findings taken from http://www.jisc.ac.uk/media/documents/programmes/elearningpedagogy/lxp2finalsynthesis.pdf
  • Digilit strategic paper for ALT-C12

    1. 1. Digital literacies in UK Universities: the state of play Helen Beetham Developing Digital Literacies programme consultant
    2. 2. Why is digital literacy an issue just now? Capacity building New local and global markets Borderless institutions Differentiation, unique brand Perceived vfm Employability Graduate attributes Digital reputation/capital Resilience New social practices Digital media and file sharing Ubiquitous connectivity Mass customisation Contractual relationships online Digital scholarship/research Open publishing/open data Digital learning/teaching media Ubiquitous knowledge/data Methodological revolution Organisational futuresEducational digital practices Personal digital practices Personal aspirations
    3. 3. How are Universities defining digital literacy? Ensuring students are prepared for study and employment in the digital age, with a range of Learning Literacies embedded into the curriculum in addition to the subject knowledge Consider the potential of technology to promote knowledge building and reflective, student-centred, creative and collaborative learning; [develop] self-regulating citizens in a globally connected society, able to handle multiple, diverse information sources and media, proficiently mediating their interactions with social and professional groups using an ever-changing and expanding range of technologies and able confidently to use digital technologies to reflect on, record and manage their lifelong learning;
    4. 4. 44 Baselining the state of play What does a 'digital literacies' agenda look like at the level of the curriculum, institutional infrastructure, policies, academic cultures, professional services?
    5. 5. 55 Baselining the state of play Organizational factors:  Policy and strategy, including 'offer' and 'brand' issues  Technical infrastructure (e.g. supporting use of personal devices and services)  Professional and support services Rich evidence from sample stakeholders about their:  Personal/professional digital skills and practices  Personal/professional development  Attitudes and beliefs about digital technology
    6. 6. What is the strategic environment? Average = 6-10 strategies Focus on responding to crisis/change The diversity of documents covering... digital matters for staff and students means there are few members of the University aware of it all – and policies may be devised and revised without much engagement across departments... Traditional mechanisms for developing and agreeing strategies lack sufficient agility. Learning and Teaching | e-learning | IS/ICT Library and Information Management Research and Knowledge Transfer | Estates Student Experience | Student Charter | HR
    7. 7. Strategic issues  Increasingly persuasive digital 'offer' to prospective students  Strategic aspirations may not be enacted in departments and programmes of study  Few opportunities for digital issues to be discussed across strategic territories  Momentum lost between change initiatives, change weariness  Lack of senior management vision BUT requires people with vision and commitment in all roles
    8. 8. Infrastructural issues  BYODevice/BYOService/BYOSkills  Data/information environment that is platform, device, and application agnostic  Providing an equivalent infrastructure across distributed sites of learning  How borderless? – public pedagogies – public scholarship – new partnerships – students and staff building independent digital reputations and careers
    9. 9. Organisational/cultural issues  Are digital capabilities a pre-requisite for access to higher education in the UK?  If so, how do universities support students who are otherwise capable of benefiting from HE?  How do universities ensure digital capital does not become another barrier or structural inequality (is it our responsibility)?  What uniquely does higher education offer, in a digital age, that is not available through informal opportunities to learn?
    10. 10. Digital practices  Hybrid practices: informal/formal contexts, insitutional/personal/public technologies, academic/digital know-how work/home life  Hidden practices: personal study habits; the outsourced curriculum Students’ digital literacy practices are predominantly contextualised within their programmes of study
    11. 11. Personal/professional development  Self-reliance for adoption of generic technologies e.g. apps, web services, devices  Structured development to introduce complex systems that support complex practices – e.g. data analysis, reference management, institutional business systems, editing software, design systems  Local peer or mentor support for advanced and contextualised use  Perceived lack of relevant, timely, local training/support
    12. 12. Attitudes and cultures  Students' digital capability still regarded with more fear than excitement  Culture clash more evident where – students/staff successful with 'traditional' modes of study – Wide 'academic generation gap'  Experience with technology leads to a more critical and discriminating attitude  Wholesale shift of focus from teaching staff using technologies to use by students is still to happen
    13. 13. Conclusion A digital University is not simply one that provides up-to-date facilities but one that prepares students to live and work in a digital society, and fosters digital scholarship as a mainstream activity. Baselining tools, resources and findings are available here: http://bit.ly/baseliningDL
    14. 14. Discussion time What are the key messages? What would help your institution to develop?

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