Literate Environment Analysis

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How to Create a Literate Environment: Interactive, Critical, and Response Perspective

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Literate Environment Analysis

  1. 1. Literate Environment Analysis Lorene Haymer EDUC 6706 R-2 The Beginning Reader, Pre- K Instructor: Cindee Easton August 18, 2013
  2. 2. Analysis As literacy educators, if we have the best interest of our students at heart, it is important that we get to know them. We should know find out about their likes and dislikes and make an effort to learn about those things that are important to them. Knowing our students helps us to better serve them and enable them to become successful readers. I can create a literate environment by ensuring that I take the time to get to know all of my learners.
  3. 3. We do not teach topics, texts, or subjects, but students. If we want them to become successful readers, we must get to know their interests, motivation, what they love, what background knowledge, they have, and look at their identity as readers, writers, listeners, speakers, and visualizers (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
  4. 4. Alphabet Soup Activity • Allow students to pick any five letters of the alphabet. • Use the letters and write five things that best describe them. • Then, using the letters, write five things that they like to do. • Also, using the letters, think about and write five things that they do not like to do. • Put their alphabets and information in their soup dish and serve (present to the class!) As the year progresses, add letters to their alphabet soup (new information).
  5. 5. I created the Alphabet Soup Activity from an activity that Dr. Almasi described in her video as “Me Stew.” This activity was instrumental to learning valuable information about my students. According to Dr. Almasi, an activity like this one can: • Promote effective, small group interaction. • Provide awesome student/teacher collaboration. • Extend students’ thinking (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010b).
  6. 6. I can create a literate environment by knowing my students interests, values and beliefs, and selecting the texts that match their interests, values, and beliefs. I can utilize the literacy matrix to determine how a particular text works with my students and how it may or may not fit into their goals as readers and my goals for them as a literacy educator.
  7. 7. Research As a literacy educator, it is important to be able to analyze and select the appropriate texts for my students. Dr. Douglas Hartman introduces a tool, the literacy matrix, that provides a balanced or full representation of the types of materials that students are engaging in (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
  8. 8. Linguistic (words) Narrative (tells a story) Informational Semiotic (pictures)
  9. 9. Learners Affective and cognitive aspects of literacy learning Texts Text structures, types, genres, and difficulty levels matched to literacy learners and literacy goals and objectives Instructional Practices Developmentally appropriate research- based practices used with appropriate texts to facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learners Interactive Perspective Reading and writing accurately, fluently, and with comprehension Being strategic and metacognitive readers and writers Use a variety of informal and formal assessments to determine areas of strength and need in literacy development. Determine texts of the appropriate types and levels of difficulty to meet literacy goals and objectives for students. Use instructional methods that address the cognitive and affective needs of students and the demands of the particular text. Promote students’ independent use of reading strategies and skills.
  10. 10. Analysis As a literacy educator, I can create a literate environment by first teaching my students how to read. Also, I can aid my students in becoming successful text processors so that they can become critical thinkers and independent learners.
  11. 11. Research The ultimate goal of the Interactive Perspective is to teach children how to be literate learners who can navigate the textual world independently (Laureate Education, Inc., 2010a).
  12. 12. Learners Affective and cognitive aspects of literacy learning Texts Text structures, types, genres, and difficulty levels matched to literacy learners and literacy goals and objectives Instructional Practices Developmentally appropriate research-based practices used with appropriate texts to facilitate affective and cognitive aspects of literacy development in all learners Critical Perspective Judging, evaluating, and thinking critically about text Find out about ideas, issues, and problems that matter to students. Understand the learner as a unique individual. Select texts that provide opportunities for students to judge, evaluate, and think critically. Foster a critical stance by teaching students how to judge, evaluate, and think critically about texts. Response Perspective Reading, reacting, and responding to text in a variety of meaningful ways Find out about students’ interests and identities. Understand what matters to students and who they are as individuals. Select texts that connect to students’identities and/or interests and that have the potential to evoke an emotional or personal response. Provide opportunities for students to read, react, and formulate a personal response to text.
  13. 13. Analysis: Critical and Response Perspective I can create a literate environment by ensuring that my students are actively apply reading strategies when they read. Also, I can create a literate environment by allowing my students to investigate, question and inquire about the text, including the author, offer different perspectives , and share with others.
  14. 14. Research: Critical and Response Perspective Being able to look at text and examine it from multiple perspectives enables one to think critically about it, to evaluate it, and make judgments about the validity or veracity of that text, which means we were looking at believability (Laureate Education, Inc. 2010a)
  15. 15. Laureate Education. Inc. (Producer). (2010a). Literacy autobiographies. [Video Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010a). Analyzing and selecting texts. [Video Webcast]. The Beginner Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010b). Getting to know your students. [Video Webcast]. The Beginner Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010a). Interactive perspective: Strategic processing. [Video Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010a). The critical perspective. [Video Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author Laureate Education, Inc. (Producer). (2010b). The response perspective. [Video Webcast]. The Beginning Reader, Pre-K. Baltimore, MD: Author

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