Social Media Analytics: Quantitative and Qualitative Reporting

2,261 views

Published on

Social Media Analytics: Quantitative and Qualitative Reporting. Learn the basics of social media reporting and discover why numbers aren’t everything. Know how to incorporate qualitative storytelling with quantitative measurements in reports in order to show impact, qualify metrics, and communicate upward.

Published in: Marketing

Social Media Analytics: Quantitative and Qualitative Reporting

  1. 1. Social Media Analytics: Quantitative and 
 Qualitative Reporting Stephanie Leishman Twitter @hatchsteph ! April 2015
  2. 2. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics What does it all mean?!
  3. 3. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Data is an opportunity 1. How can we change for the better? 2. Prove you’re doing things right. 3. Understand why ____ is happening. 4. Make convincing proposals.
  4. 4. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Quantitative Qualitative Q# Q*
  5. 5. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Likes on Facebook posts, March 10-16 3/10: 141 3/11: 135 3/12: 833 3/13: 3,841* 3/14: 3,954* 3/15: n/a *Pi Day posts 3/16: 518 Q# = Spike in posts! Q* = Let me tell you why.
  6. 6. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Question: ! Which Facebook post was more successful? ! Post A – Comments: 0 Post B – Comments: 1,476 Q# = Success!
  7. 7. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Q* Q# Question: ! Which Facebook post was more successful? ! Post A – Comments: 0 Post B – Negative Comments: 1,476 Q# = Success! Q* = Let me clarify.
  8. 8. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics What should I measure? 1. What goal am I trying to achieve? ! 2. What specific metrics would show 
 my level of achievement 
 toward that goal?
  9. 9. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Determine the right metrics “What info do you really need in order to make decisions about what to do differently?” ! – Erik Hagen Director of Web Communications, California Lutheran University ! ! http://higheredanalytics.com/analytics/index.php/2015/02/meet-highered-analytics-pros-erik- hagen-erik_hagen-from-callutheran/
  10. 10. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Every department is unique Every department is different from another, and different from the global average. Don’t base assumptions on an infographic you found online. ! Your analytics will be unique, so adjust your strategy accordingly.
  11. 11. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Before reporting: set up data-gathering Native analytics dashboards, third-party apps, online tools, manual notes, and more
  12. 12. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics View your analytics regularly Twitter: analytics.twitter.com Facebook: Insights (top of page) Tumblr: Activity (right margin) Instagram: iconosquare.com > Statistics Google+: Dashboard > View insights ! Google Analytics > Social > Network referrals Also: medium, source, campaign ! Hootsuite: Analytics (left sidebar)
  13. 13. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Facebook
  14. 14. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Google+ Google+: Dashboard > View insights
  15. 15. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Twitter analytics.twitter.com
  16. 16. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Tumblr
  17. 17. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Tumblr
  18. 18. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Instagram: Iconosquare
  19. 19. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Instagram: Iconosquare You can act on this information.
  20. 20. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Instagram: Iconosquare With this information, you can adjust your tactics.
  21. 21. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Google Analytics: social referrals
  22. 22. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Set up data gathering tools • Shorten links • Use source code • Set up hashtag tracking • Use data archiving and visualization tools
  23. 23. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics “Marketers are overworked and underpaid. You have regular duties and responsibilities in your job, and normally they don’t account for committing time to analyzing data. So you need to look for leverage in how you commit time and resources. ! – Ian Michiels, @InsightFanatic
  24. 24. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics bitly
  25. 25. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics bitly
  26. 26. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Source code: Google’s URL builder https://support.google.com/ analytics/answer/1033867?hl=en
  27. 27. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Source code: Hootsuite Pro
  28. 28. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Source code I created a link with source code, shared it on Twitter, and a few minutes later checked Google Analytics > Behavior > Site Content > All Pages. I can see how many views are coming as a result of my tweet apart from the views coming to that page from other sources.
  29. 29. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Benefits of using source code 1. You know which source caused the most reach, despite where the link ends up traveling. ! ! !
  30. 30. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Hootsuite archiving ^ e.g., Diversity Summit ! Start the archive before your Twitter chat or event. Hootsuite > settings > archives $10/month for 10,000 archived messages
  31. 31. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Hashtracking.com Set up hashtracking before your Twitter chat or event. ! As low as $29/month
  32. 32. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Notes - keep a diary Notes are short reminders that add meaning to data. You can keep a simple Excel spreadsheet of dates with department events, social network feature releases, etc. If you record moments as you go, you won’t have to spend as much time sleuthing later.
  33. 33. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics MIT’s Facebook Insights We lost ~10,000 followers in 10 days. ! Was it Pi Day’s fault? ! No. But, if I hadn’t keep notes, I wouldn’t have known why this happened. ! Facebook removed fake user accounts that same week.610000 615000 620000 625000 630000 3/9 3/13 3/14 3/23 3/30 ^ Pi Day
  34. 34. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Google Analytics annotations MIT Connect: bounce rate ^ e.g., Twitter chat (linked to several pages during chat)
  35. 35. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Post-event data gathering Sleuthing, pulling user-generated content, emergency/issue/trend reporting, and more
  36. 36. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Storify
  37. 37. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Storify
  38. 38. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy: social search
  39. 39. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy search: MIT sustainability
  40. 40. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy search: “Alan Turing”
  41. 41. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy search: Alan Turing
  42. 42. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy search: Alan Turing vs. Albert Einstein
  43. 43. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Topsy search: Turing vs. Einstein vs. Beyonce
  44. 44. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Create reports
  45. 45. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics “There are two goals when presenting data: convey your story and establish credibility.” ! – Edward Tufte
  46. 46. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Components of an analytics report 1. Design 2. The numbers 3. Story 4. Assessment 5. Recommendation/next steps
  47. 47. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Analytics reporting tips 1. Focus on actionable analytics. 2. Better design doesn’t mean prettier; it 
 means easier to understand. 3. Base measurement on department 
 goals/priorities. 4. Answer the question “So what?”
  48. 48. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Reports come in different shapes and sizes A report can be a Word document, PowerPoint slides, Evernote note, etc. – any format that allows you to include data, stories, your assessment, and recommendations. ! Spreadsheets and automated analytics emails are not full reports, but do help in creating reports. These documents usually contain only numbers and demographics. ! A report should include your analysis and recommendations.
  49. 49. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Trend report A trend report is a quick overview of what decision makers need to know in order to make informed decisions as quickly as possible.
  50. 50. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Trend report Proactive trend report (before event) 1. Summary and recommended action
 A few sentences 2. Trending negative, neutral, and positive related 
 content on social web; 
 Number of posts + representative post screenshot
 Keywords (Google AdWords) trends 3. Options for action
 What may happen in different scenarios? 
 Highlight your recommended action.
  51. 51. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Google AdWords keyword planner http://adwords.google.com/ko/KeywordPlanner
  52. 52. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Trend report Reactive trend report (after event) 1. Summary and recommendations 
 A few sentences 2. Trending responses on social media
 Number of posts + representative post screenshot 3. What went wrong/right 
 And recommendations for resolving issues
  53. 53. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Trend report excerpt: MITAlert In the last 10 minutes, 25 tweets indicate that using building numbers is unclear. Example below.
  54. 54. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Trend report excerpt: MITAlert Recommendation: Include a screenshot of the campus map and/or link to marker (mitsha.re/bldg18) to help people understand quickly what area they should avoid. Use this format for future emergency alerts.
  55. 55. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Case studies MIT$Connect$Blog$ Post$by$Kellen$Manning,$$ MIT$Division$of$Student$Life$
  56. 56. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Case studies 1. How did you prepare/plan, if applicable? ! 2. What happened? Why? ! 3. What did you learn? ! 4. What would you do differently, if applicable?
  57. 57. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Case studies MIT$Connect$Blog$ Post$by$Stephanie$Leishman$
  58. 58. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics “The post received over 200 comments, including a comment from President Rafael Reif.” ! – “Meltdown”: A Twitter Case Study ! Include qualitative and quantitative elements in your case study. Q* Q#
  59. 59. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Case studies MIT$Connect$Blog$ Post$by$Stephanie$Leishman$
  60. 60. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Report: print vs. social Print newsletter Facebook page Frequency 1/semester (fall, spring, summer) 1/day Cost $22,000 (design, print, postage) $100 (boosted posts) Total audience 10,000 11,740 Type Opt-out Opt-in Impressions/semester (unknown) 72,115 Avg. age 43 29
  61. 61. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics After reporting
  62. 62. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Ultimately, your report is for you “Ultimately, the efficacy of the report will depend on the ability of its writer to extract meaningful insights from raw data.” – Brandwatch ! “After all, one of the biggest challenges we face in social media marketing is that there are hundreds of different elements we could measure. Sometimes it seems like we’re measuring for the sake of measuring, or clinging to meaningless figures just because they’re easy to get. Yet, the only question we really need to answer is: Is social media worth it?” – Courtney Seiter
  63. 63. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Why measure? “The goal of measurement, after all, is clarity. A good measurement foundation for social media begins with a functional consideration of what social media might be used for and accomplish.” ! – Gary Angel
  64. 64. Stephanie Leishman | Social Media Analytics Go through all the steps From “Content Marketing KPIs – Measuring Results and Tracking ROI” by Nick Rojas ! 1. Make measurement a priority. 2. Track conversion rates and their origin. 3. Consult with others in your industry. 4. Be ready to ditch what isn’t working. 5. Continue to examine and re-evaluate.
  65. 65. Stephanie Leishman Twitter: @hatchsteph Email: hatch_s@mit.edu

×