Master’s    Degree --Foci: Literacy as a Critical Social Practice To question the everyday including popular culture and t...
Engagements Students read, discussed, and reflected on articles by Alan Luke,  Andy Manning, Peter Freebody, Peggy McIntos...
Motivated Signs <ul><li>All ‘signs’ are motivated.  In a children’s book, for example, </li></ul><ul><li>one has to assume...
Books
--Sandra C.
Willy & Hugh Interesting Readings Group of gorillas read as, the “in-group” (Leslie); “an exclusive club” (Mary Ann); “ an...
Willy & Hugh  Signs Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84% Body Language (Facial Expressions) 63% Size 56% Dress (Col...
Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84%
Body Language 63%
Size 56%
Dress (Color) 41%
Activities 31%
Language (Names; Sound Bytes) 31%
Species 06%
Willy & Hugh  Signs Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84% Body Language (Facial Expressions) 63% Size 56% Dress (Col...
Sister Anne’s Hands Interesting Readings Opening references to Ed Sullivan Show and “peace signs being in” read  as “a tim...
Sister Ann’s Hands Signs Metaphoric Language 71% Activities (Making a card; paper airplane) 50% Color 75% Hands References...
Willy & Hugh  Signs 2 nd  Group Size 82% Dress (Color) 79% Activities (Watching Joggers; Library) 75% Language (Names; Sou...
REVISION OF INVITATION <ul><li>1.  Identify the stereotype being addressed.  </li></ul><ul><li>Identify 5 signs which are ...
Into the Forest  Signs Color or lack thereof  .93% Barrenness (Forest) .59% Opening (Storm) .45% Reference to Other Fairy ...
Interesting Readings “ Nice Little Cake” = read as “Temptation” (Darryl) and as something  “ Coveted” (Tina), that is, som...
Sister Anne’s Hands  Signs Metaphoric Language 64% Activities (Making a card; paper airplane) 73% Color 79% Hands Referenc...
Conclusions Teachers tend to give “nice” rather than “critical” reading of children’s books even when those books address ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

NRC 2009 Harste

883 views

Published on

Presentation: Harste, J. C., (2009). Willy and Hugh get critical. Presentation at the annual meeting of the Literacy Research Association (formerly National Reading Conference), Albuquerque, NM

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
883
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
5
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
6
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

NRC 2009 Harste

  1. 1. Master’s Degree --Foci: Literacy as a Critical Social Practice To question the everyday including popular culture and the media To understand and explore how power and politics impact us via the texts we encounter and read To support the taking on of multiple perspectives To instill in learners the need to ask questions and to engage in inquiry. To move thinking to action for purposes of promoting social justice
  2. 2. Engagements Students read, discussed, and reflected on articles by Alan Luke, Andy Manning, Peter Freebody, Peggy McIntosh, Gunter Kress, Patrick Shannon, Carol Edelsky, Bess Alterwerger, Vivian Vasquez, Philip McCormick, Barbara Comber, Hilary Janks, Bill Greene, Colin Lankshear, Brian Street, Michel Knobel, Shirley Brice Heath, Donna Alverman, Mitzi Lewison, Christine Leland, Richard Beach, Gerald Campano, Peggy Albers Once a month they also participated in curricular engagements where they were invited to see all texts as political, interrogate the everyday (including advertisements and the media), try on new perspectives and, rather than leave issues at an academic level, propose and take social action. They were also encouraged to work with their own students in supporting them in taking on a critical perspective and in sharing their successes and frustrations.
  3. 3. Motivated Signs <ul><li>All ‘signs’ are motivated. In a children’s book, for example, </li></ul><ul><li>one has to assume that everything was done on purpose. </li></ul><ul><li>Read “Willy & Hugh” and, working alone, identify: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What you see as significant signs; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>b. How you think the author wanted you to read these signs, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What work you see these signs doing in terms of positioning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the reader. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reference: Lewison, M., Leland, C., & Harste, J. (2008). Creating Critical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Classrooms . Taylor & Frances. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Books
  5. 5. --Sandra C.
  6. 6. Willy & Hugh Interesting Readings Group of gorillas read as, the “in-group” (Leslie); “an exclusive club” (Mary Ann); “ an exclusive team – no one else allowed” (Marcia) Willy’s posture read as “downtrodden, downcast, lonely, sad, unexpressive, uninterested, perhaps unmotivated” (Alison) Motorcycle outfit read as “tough guy” (Christine A.), “bully” (Jamie) Tree trunks as backdrop to joggers read as “strong, firm, distant, rigid” (Penny) Handshake signifies “cooperation” (Marisa); “a friendship begins” (Jessica); “ camaraderie” (Ingrid); “the beginning of a relationship” (Maria Luisa); “a coming together” (Lisa) “ Authority” is seen as being signified by “police cap” (Anne); “sunglasses” (Christine B.) Willy’s clothing read as “nerdy”; shirt tail hanging out read as “belonging to a rougher crowd” (Cathy) Red shirt read as “strength”; Blue shirt read as “weakness” (Jacquie) Big Ideas seen as “Everyone has something to contribute; Friendship is a two way street; No one wants to be excluded” (Sylvia); “Nice guys finish first” (Luciana); “Friends come in all shapes and sizes” (Jen);
  7. 7. Willy & Hugh Signs Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84% Body Language (Facial Expressions) 63% Size 56% Dress (Color) 41% Activities (Watching Joggers; Library) 31% Language (Names; Sound Bytes) 31% Species 06% Gender .00% N=32
  8. 8. Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84%
  9. 9. Body Language 63%
  10. 10. Size 56%
  11. 11. Dress (Color) 41%
  12. 12. Activities 31%
  13. 13. Language (Names; Sound Bytes) 31%
  14. 14. Species 06%
  15. 15. Willy & Hugh Signs Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 84% Body Language (Facial Expressions) 63% Size 56% Dress (Color) 41% Activities (Watching Joggers; Library) 31% Language (Names; Sound Bytes) 31% Species 06% Gender .00% N=32
  16. 16. Sister Anne’s Hands Interesting Readings Opening references to Ed Sullivan Show and “peace signs being in” read as “a time of innocence” (Kevin) Lots of references to metaphoric language – “a person of her color,” “ the colors of hatred,” “kissed by an angel,” “learning how to use her wings,” “as colorful as birds” Butterfly read as “rebirth” (Lisa) Lots of references to hands: Open hands read as an open heart; Fist read as closed heart and mind Colors of hands (“pink like Barbie”, brown, white) read as “a coming together” (Bernice) Nun read as sign of Christianity and Catholicism (Cathy); Image of the kindly nun is highlighted and built upon (Jess) Illustrations show “stereotypical” classroom as “ bleak” (Angela), “dingy,” “ kids in straight rows,” (Anabel), and “an apple on the teacher’s desk” (Dervel)
  17. 17. Sister Ann’s Hands Signs Metaphoric Language 71% Activities (Making a card; paper airplane) 50% Color 75% Hands References 93% Race and Ethnicity 43% References to Pop Culture 43% References to Habit/Social Class/Role 36% Illustrations .29% Church’s Involvement .00% N=28
  18. 18. Willy & Hugh Signs 2 nd Group Size 82% Dress (Color) 79% Activities (Watching Joggers; Library) 75% Language (Names; Sound Bites) 71% Positioning of Characters (Perspective) 50% Body Language (includes Facial Expression) 14% Species 14% Gender 07% N=28
  19. 19. REVISION OF INVITATION <ul><li>1. Identify the stereotype being addressed. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify 5 signs which are being used to convey that stereotype. </li></ul><ul><li>Interrogate what still isn’t being addressed. </li></ul>
  20. 20. Into the Forest Signs Color or lack thereof .93% Barrenness (Forest) .59% Opening (Storm) .45% Reference to Other Fairy Tales .76% Reference Little Red Riding Hood .28% Gender of Protagonist .38% Body or Facial Expressions .14% Ending .28% Absent Father .76%
  21. 21. Interesting Readings “ Nice Little Cake” = read as “Temptation” (Darryl) and as something “ Coveted” (Tina), that is, something which was wanted that he had. As soon as the story was seen as a fairy tale, it was read as a “Cautionary Tale” (Dorothy). “ Children meeting on the road” = read as representing “other stories where children lost their parents” (Fady). Grandmother = read as comforting, nice, warm (Sharida). “Mother’s open arms” = read as redemption; the Catholic image of Christ with his outstretched hands (Marta) Moral synthesized as “women love; men leave” (Betty).
  22. 22. Sister Anne’s Hands Signs Metaphoric Language 64% Activities (Making a card; paper airplane) 73% Color 79% Hands References 67% Race and Ethnicity 46% References to Pop Culture 15% References to Habit/Social Class/Role 64% Illustrations 36% Church’s Involvement .24% N=33
  23. 23. Conclusions Teachers tend to give “nice” rather than “critical” reading of children’s books even when those books address important social issues. The more explicit the instructional engagement the more successful teachers were in unpacking the stereotypes and social issues that were implicitly being addressed (and or ignored) in the children’s books used in this study. Children’s books which address social issues which hit too close to home (that is, which directly relate to the life space of the participant), seem harder for participants to unpack than do the social issues in books which seem more distant to the participant in terms of his or her personal life space.

×