Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Ella, Phoebe and Harry
The beginning of Zombie conforms with Barthes theory that every
film has different codes in which an audience tries to mak...
The opening of ‘The Rattler’ shows the protagonist in the initial
scene, being pestered by an unknown caller (the villain)...
The opening scene of Night Swim conforms with Mulvey’s
idea of The Male Gaze as the protagonist is a female,
swimming in a...
The opening of ‘Amy’s Torch’ shows the protagonist in the
initial scene, with a torch, that protects her from a monster
un...
S h o r t   f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
S h o r t   f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
S h o r t   f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
S h o r t   f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

S h o r t f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222

428 views

Published on

vgcuysgiuldswvabiwsfduivbs

Published in: Data & Analytics
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

S h o r t f i lm 222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222

  1. 1. Ella, Phoebe and Harry
  2. 2. The beginning of Zombie conforms with Barthes theory that every film has different codes in which an audience tries to make sense of. These codes are shown in ‘Zombie’ where the protagonist tries to understand what is going on. This allows the audience to be in the same position as the protagonist in their and our short films. In the opening scene the audience are set up to believe that they will see who turned the protagonist into a zombie. Applying these theories enables the audience to connect, relate and feel comfortable in watching a film when they know what’s going to happen.
  3. 3. The opening of ‘The Rattler’ shows the protagonist in the initial scene, being pestered by an unknown caller (the villain). This conforms with Propps theory of villain/hero. The film also countertypes Todrov’s theory that there is always an equilibrium at the beginning of a story followed by a problem. In ‘The Rattler’ the problem is seen to be the unknown caller and when she accepts an incoming call from the unidentified caller, she comes face to face with a video of herself; which is strange as although she is identified as the hero, it is now questioned as to whether or not she is the villain. This leads to the protagonist being attacked (after she decided to cower in the bathroom- a typical convention in a horror film) and is killed by The Rattler. The audience finally, is put through an uncomfortable viewing experience, as when the protagonist dies there is a strange editing process of black cuts to filter some of the graphic scenes.
  4. 4. The opening scene of Night Swim conforms with Mulvey’s idea of The Male Gaze as the protagonist is a female, swimming in a bikini. Although her attire conforms to the typical weakness of a female in a horror film (making her vulnerable) the diegetic sound challenges these themes, as in a horror film you don’t expect to hear such upbeat jazz music. Levi strauss’ theory is used here as binary opposites. In the opening of the film, the protagonist is clearly seen as the hero and vulnerable, whereas this changes as the protagonist is later on seen over the pool (clearly been drowned) looking over the innocent girl in the ppool
  5. 5. The opening of ‘Amy’s Torch’ shows the protagonist in the initial scene, with a torch, that protects her from a monster under her bed. The monster under her bed is clearly seen as the villain. One could question the status of the hero in the short film; it could possibly be the mother until she is killed by the monster, as she tries to protect her daughter. In addition to this, the torch could be seen as the false hero in this short film as it protects Amy from the monster under the bed. This conforms with Propps theory of villain/hero.

×