Fish has a muscle composition similar to that of meat but has  far less connective tissue  and is therefore,  more   tende...
Fish muscle has segments of short fibres These segments are separated by sheets of fine connective tissue, which are fragi...
3 categories: Oily  – Mackerel, Salmon, Sardine, Herring  White  – Cod, Haddock, Plaice, Sole Shell  – Prawn, Crab, Lobste...
Fat content : Oily fish have more than 5% fat in their flesh White fish have less than 5% fat in their flesh Shellfish are...
How much? 2 portions a week (140g = 1 portion), 1 of which should be an oily fish. Fish are rich in protein and minerals (...
Cooking fish: The flesh in fish starts to coagulate (set) at 60°C so it is necessary to protect it by coating with flour, ...
Preservation: Fish start to deteriorate as soon as they are caught. Most fish are put on ice or frozen; this increases the...
Preservation: In pairs, research the following preservation techniques: Freezing,  chilling,  cook chill,  modified atmosp...
Extension Secondary processing of fish: Secondary products Fish fingers: white fish Paella: shellfish
Homework for Thursday 20 th  Jan What is Omega-3? What are the best sources of Omega-3? What foods have Omega-3 added to t...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Protein; fish

712 views

Published on

GCSE food technology

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
712
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Protein; fish

  1. 2. Fish has a muscle composition similar to that of meat but has far less connective tissue and is therefore, more tender and quicker to cook . Fish muscle has segments of short fibres which give the flaky texture . These segments are separated by sheets of fine connective tissue, which is fragile and easily converted to gelatine. The combination of short muscle fibres and gelatine gives fish its tenderness. This is why overcooking will result in fish falling apart.
  2. 3. Fish muscle has segments of short fibres These segments are separated by sheets of fine connective tissue, which are fragile and easily converted to gelatine.
  3. 4. 3 categories: Oily – Mackerel, Salmon, Sardine, Herring White – Cod, Haddock, Plaice, Sole Shell – Prawn, Crab, Lobster, Oyster, Mussels
  4. 5. Fat content : Oily fish have more than 5% fat in their flesh White fish have less than 5% fat in their flesh Shellfish are very rich in vitamins and minerals, whilst very low in fat.
  5. 6. How much? 2 portions a week (140g = 1 portion), 1 of which should be an oily fish. Fish are rich in protein and minerals (Most important are Calcium and Phosphorus.) All fish are high in B vitamins. Oil-rich fish are high in the vitamins A and D. Oily fish are especially high in omega-3 fatty acids (a polyunsaturated fat which may help prevent heart disease) Why don’t people eat enough fish? Why are they put off?
  6. 7. Cooking fish: The flesh in fish starts to coagulate (set) at 60°C so it is necessary to protect it by coating with flour, breadcrumbs or butter when frying, grilling or baking. Fish can be steamed or poached without being coated.
  7. 8. Preservation: Fish start to deteriorate as soon as they are caught. Most fish are put on ice or frozen; this increases their shelf-life because freezing slows down all enzymic and bacterial activity. How can fish be preserved? Give examples… Salmon, herring Smoked Example: Preservation method
  8. 9. Preservation: In pairs, research the following preservation techniques: Freezing, chilling, cook chill, modified atmospheric packaging (MAP), UHT, canning, dehydration, vacuum packaging. What are they? How do they work? What products are packaged in that way?
  9. 10. Extension Secondary processing of fish: Secondary products Fish fingers: white fish Paella: shellfish
  10. 11. Homework for Thursday 20 th Jan What is Omega-3? What are the best sources of Omega-3? What foods have Omega-3 added to them?

×