Baking Techniques

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GCSE food technology

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Baking Techniques

  1. 1. Candidates should have knowledge and understanding of a range of processes used to make products and have the opportunity to use the following skills and processes in their practical work: Baked products: rubbing in, creaming, melting, whisking, all-in-one, kneading, folding, rolling, shaping, cutting
  2. 2. Rubbing in <ul><li>Technique where flour is rubbed into a fat to make dishes such as shortcrust pastry, crumbles and scones. </li></ul><ul><li>Using your fingertips, rub the flour and butter together until the mixture resembles breadcrumbs </li></ul><ul><li>Lift the mixture up as you rub it in so that the air going through it keeps it cool. </li></ul><ul><li>Shake the bowl every so often to bring the larger lumps of butter to the surface. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Creaming Method <ul><li>'Creaming' means combining sugar with a solid fat used in cake making. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure the fat has softened to room temperature before you start. </li></ul><ul><li>Beat the fat with the sugar to a light and fluffy texture - start mixing quite slowly and, as the mixture becomes softer and well combined, you can mix faster. </li></ul><ul><li>As you beat it, the mixture should increase in volume and take on a paler colour. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Melting Method <ul><li>This is also classified as a rich cake as there is half the amount of fat to flour so these cakes also have good keeping qualities, flapjack, gingerbread. </li></ul><ul><li>The texture and flavour of these cakes would improve if they were kept for at least a day before serving. The crust will have softened and the flavour would have developed. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Whisking Method <ul><li>Contains no fat. The eggs and sugar are whisked together until thick and creamy. </li></ul><ul><li>Swiss roll, flans, gateaux. </li></ul><ul><li>An electric mixer facilitates whisking but with hand whisking, placing the bowl over hot water helps to give a faster result. </li></ul><ul><li>Then gently fold in the flour with a metal spoon or spatula. </li></ul>
  6. 6. All-in-one Method <ul><li>Exactly as the name suggests, these cakes are mixed all in one go. </li></ul><ul><li>Victoria sponge and fairy cakes. </li></ul><ul><li>All the ingredients go into the bowl together and the mixing is done in seconds. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Kneading - dough <ul><li>Kneading means working and stretching dough, either by hand or using an electric dough hook. </li></ul><ul><li>The process makes the dough smoother and softer and develops the elasticity of the gluten in the flour. </li></ul><ul><li>It also evenly incorporates air and any additional ingredients. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Folding <ul><li>Folding is to combine a light ingredient or mixture with a much heavier mixture while retaining as much air as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully cut through the mixture with the edge of the spoon, working in a gentle figure of eight and moving the bowl as you go. </li></ul><ul><li>Scrape around the sides and base of the bowl at intervals to incorporate all of the lighter ingredients into the mixture. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Shaping and Cutting <ul><li>Shaping – using your hands or a pastry cutter to style the product into desired shape (bread rolls) </li></ul><ul><li>Cutting – using a pastry cutter to cut out shapes (scones, biscuits) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Rolling Out - pastry <ul><li>Be as cool as possible. </li></ul><ul><li>Firm consistency. </li></ul><ul><li>Lightly floured survey. </li></ul><ul><li>Use short, even strokes. </li></ul><ul><li>After each stroke, spin the pastry through a quarter turn, do not turn the pastry over. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Standard and pre manufactured components. <ul><li>e.g. flour is a standard component of pastry and pastry is a standard component of an apple pie. </li></ul><ul><li>Quicker </li></ul><ul><li>Cheaper </li></ul><ul><li>Simpler to buy in ready prepared ingredients </li></ul><ul><li>Match the 8 definitions to either advantages or disadvantages and stick them down on A4 </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>A cake manufacturer wants develop a new range </li></ul><ul><li>of cake products which: </li></ul><ul><li>Are attractive to school children </li></ul><ul><li>Include fruit for fibre </li></ul><ul><li>Are suitable for a packed lunch box </li></ul><ul><li>Working in small groups, each group using a </li></ul><ul><li>different method of cake making, design and make </li></ul><ul><li>a range of products which fits in with the </li></ul><ul><li>specification. </li></ul><ul><li>You will then individually pick a design and plan a </li></ul><ul><li>method for the design and make it next Thursday </li></ul><ul><li>10 th Feb. </li></ul>

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