Teacherreports

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  • Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
  • EVAAS value-added modeling is based on the philosophy that all kids count and that schools should not be held responsible for the things they cannot change, like a child’s socio-economic status, and that schools should be responsible for the things they can change, like a child’s growth during a year of schooling. We believe that: --All kids count --All kids can learn --All kids deserve opportunities to make appropriate academic progress every year --Educators can manage their effectiveness to improve student opportunities. More specifically, value-added does this by following the same student over time and utilizing all available scores from each student’s informational array.
  • Teacherreports

    1. 1. Making Data Work for Kids:EVAAS Teacher ReportsOctober 2012SAS® EVAAS® for K-12 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    2. 2. Presenter Dr. Sandy Horn Senior Educator Support Specialist SAS EVAAS sandy.horn@sas.com 2 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    3. 3. Why should you care about your EVAAS Teacher Value Added Report? Beginning with your 2013 report, it becomes part of your evaluation.  Standard 6 – Teachers contribute to the academic success of their students. (Measurable Progress)  Standard 4 – Teachers facilitate learning for their students » Teachers plan instruction appropriate for their students » Use data for short and long range planning  Standard 5 – Teachers reflect on their practice. » Teacher analyze student learning.But your report is not just an evaluation component. It is also a powerful tool for improving your effectiveness as a teacher. So why else should you care? 3 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    4. 4. Why should you care about your EVAASTeacher Value Added Report?You care about your students. 4 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    5. 5. Achievement vs. ProgressStudent Progress – How far have I come?Highly dependent on what happens as a result ofschooling rather than on demographic factors. 5 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    6. 6. High-Achieving Students and Progress All schools in Tennessee in 2011 - Math students in grades 4 through 8. Districts, schools, and teachers that serve high achieving students can make excellent progress, just as easily as those that serve low achieving students. 6 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    7. 7. High-Achieving Students and Progress All schools in Pennsylvania in 2011 - Math students in grades 4 through 8.Districts, schools, and teachers that serve high achieving students can make excellent progress,just as easily as those that serve low achieving students. 7 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    8. 8. Achievement vs. ProgressBy concentrating on the progress students make, EVAASputs the emphasis on something educators are responsiblefor and can do something about. Average progress (oneyear of academic gain) is the minimum expectation. Inother words, it is expected that students will not loseground, relative to their peers, in the course of the year. 8 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    9. 9. 9Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    10. 10. 10Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    11. 11. 11Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    12. 12. 12Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    13. 13. 13Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    14. 14. 14Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    15. 15. EVAAS can tell you WHAT happened. It’s up toYOU to determine WHY it happened and whatyou want to do about it. 15 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    16. 16. Effectiveness Categories State Growth Standard/State Average = 0.0 Standard Error = a measure of uncertainty Usually, the more data you have, the smaller the standard error. Index = Teacher Estimate divided by its Standard Error Index is 2 or higher Index is equal to or greater than a -2 but less than +20.0 Index is less than -2 16 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    17. 17. EVAAS Teacher Value Added ReportRules of Effectiveness Level DeterminationExceeds Expected Growth: Teachers whose students are making substantially moreprogress than the state average (the teachers index is 2 or greater).Meets Expected Growth: Teachers whose students are making the same amount ofprogress as the state average (the teachers index is equal to or greater than -2 but lessthan 2).Does Not Meet Expected Growth: Teachers whose students are making substantiallyless progress than the state average (the teachers index is less than -2). 17 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    18. 18. Student Teacher Linkages 18 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    19. 19. EVAAS Student Report 19 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    20. 20. EVAAS Teacher Value Added Report Supplemental Information Table 20 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    21. 21. EVAAS Teacher Diagnostic Report 21 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    22. 22. EVAAS Teacher Diagnostic Report 22 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    23. 23. School Composites 23 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    24. 24. Underlying Philosophy  All students deserve opportunities to make appropriate academic progress every year.  There is no “one size fits all” way of educating students who enter a class at different levels of academic achievement.  Adjustments to instruction should be based on the academic attainment of students, not on socio-economic factors.  Given reliable information on past effectiveness, educators can make appropriate adjustments to improve student opportunities.  "What teachers know and can do is the most important influence on what students learn." (National Commission on Teaching and Americas Future, 1996)  One of the most important things educators can know is who they are effective with and who they are not. 24 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.
    25. 25. SAS EVAAS Questions? http://ncdpi.sas.com Sandy.Horn@sas.com 25 Copyright © 2010, SAS Institute Inc. All rights reserved.

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