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F 60 (1)

  1. 1. Study The Fashion Trend of Era 60s 70s 80s 90s FOOT WEAR DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE MONIKA RATHOR 02-Mar-17
  2. 2. CONTENTS  FASHION OF TREND 60S  FASHION OF TREND 70S  FASHION OF TREND 80S  FASHION OF TREND 90S
  3. 3. Fashion trend of era of 60,s of womens and men 1960s Fashion prior to the British invasion in 1964 was a continuation of the late 1950s. But with the Beatles came a new and very different fashion influencenot Paris or Milan but “swinging” London. The brand new post war “babyboomer” generation was proving that it was a power to be reckoned with. Theyhad energy and sheer numbers on their side and they turned the designers away from catering to the old and wealthy to creating fashions specifically for young adults. As the phenomenon continued teens and even pre-teens were also included for the first time. Mary Quant out of her small boutique in London hit upon the winning combinations and created a fashion feeding frenzy starting with the mini skirt and crowning with major fashion houses the likes of Chanel and Dior following suit. Styles which were previously driven by the necessities of the middle class were now being designed for young peoplewho constituted a newly empowered buyers market.
  4. 4. In one fashion camp were the social anarchists rebelling against the establishment as well as mainstream styles. The Hippie movement favored relaxed, comfortable and natural clothing styles. The norm for most college age kids was bluejeans and a tee shirt (tie-dyed or not). The other 1960s fashion style was in a lot of ways much moreof a departure from what had been the status quo. Featuring bright colors, leg revealing lengths, and hyper tailored designs Mod Fashions were a must for the “in crowd”. Designers like Cardin, Emilio Pucci and Paco Rabanne jumped on this fashion trend to showcase their talents. 1960s fashion was bi-
  5. 5. polar in just about every way. The early sixties were morereminiscent of the 1950s — conservative and restrained; certainlymore classic in style and design. Two other very popular styles of the sixties which proved to be more enduring were the mini skirt and bell bottom pants. The mini was the most seen fashion modification of the decade. It was worn by everyone from the trendiest celebrities to office workers, to housewives. Along with the birth control pill nothing else empowered women as much. The mini embodied the growing woman’smovement portraying both their individualityand sexuality.
  6. 6. Bell bottom pants Several conservativestyles from JC Penney A bell bottom outfit A sailor outfit designed by Mary Quant 1966
  7. 7. Magazine ad from the 1960’s1960s was known as the “Space Age” and fashionsreflected that with the use of space age type materials. By the late sixties Mod fashions had gone couturier and were heavily influenced by the European Design Houses.
  8. 8. Notice the European influence Meanwhile in California the hippie movement was gaining popularity. Hippie fashion was relaxed, easy, inexpensive and best of all anti-establishment. Its relevance in fashion was fairly narrow but the impact the youth who wore it had on society, music, culture and politics was substantial. Mod influenced Tie-dying of carefree
  9. 9. hippie styles and vice versa almost anything became “chic”. style The one thing that went well with all of the 1960s fashions was a pair of good looking boots. Various sixties boot styles These girls had the whole Nancy Sinatra “these boots were made for walking” thing going on. The late 1960s were the exact opposite. Bright, swirling colors. Psychedelic, tie-dye shirts and long hair and beards were commonplace. Woman wore unbelievably short skirts and men wore tunics and capes. The foray into fantasy would not have been believed by people just a decade earlier. It’s almost like the 1950s bottled everyone up so much that the late 1960s exploded like an old pressure cooker. Women were showing more skin than ever before. For the first timein the 19th Century, London, not Paris, was the center of the fashion world.
  10. 10. The British Invasion didn’t stop with The Beatles. It swept into all parts of life, especially clothing. But actually, lost in the two extremes is the mid- 60s, which I think actually had the coolest style, albeit more subtle. I love the long, slender shapes, the bright colors and the young, London look. I have always wished the Mod style stuck around a little longer. 1960s Shoes: 8 Popular Shoe Styles SHARES449 1960s shoes. Vintage (l) and new (r) 1960s shoe styles.
  11. 11. 1964 Shoes The 1960s like the 1920s was a decade for the young. Not that one had to be young just dress in a childish, androgynous fashion. Gone were the days of the refined and elegant 1950s woman with her high stiletto heels. The new generation wanted to be comfortable, free spirited and cheap! Couture shoe fashion was replaced by street fashion. Expensive materials and long life
  12. 12. was snubbed for penny saving throw away styles that made it possibleto own dozens of 1960s shoes for every season. Soundslike today’s market? 1968 Colorful PVC Shoes 1960s shoe styles reflected the change in fashion. Instead of big heels, shoes were now
  13. 13. flat, very flat. Many had small square heels and a single Mary Jane strap just like a doll’s shoes. Flat and low heel shoes were comfortable, easy to wear, easy to live life in. Just what every woman wanted in her 1960s clothes. Shoes were also cheaper because new inventionsin types of plastic and vinyl made making shoes inexpensive to mass produce. They didn’t last long but they didn’t need to either. With new materials came new, brighter colors, that matched whatever trendy color was in fashion that season. Baby pink, lime green, deep purple, mustard yellow, and sky blue to name a few.
  14. 14. Long legs, funky tights, flat two tone shoes. Very mod indeed! The short skirts and dresses of the 60s exposed leg- lots of leg- which influenced shoe fashion as well. To keep from accidentally showing her panties, a woman sat with her knees together but feet apart, making her shoes all the more noticeable. With so much leg exposed and
  15. 15. bright colored shoes, women’s footwear becamea focal point rather than an accessory. Besides the general silhouetteof flat shoes, there were multiple variations of flats as well as boots in the 1960s. 1960s Pointed Flat Shoes Pointed Toe Flats The late 1950s winklepicker with sharp pointed toe combined with a flat ballet shoe and created the pointy toe flat of the early ’60s. It looked innocent with mini skirts making them less
  16. 16. sexual than when paired with high heels. The shoe tip extended past the natural toe line so that they no longer pinched a woman’s foot and gave her bunions, ouch! The extra length was a bit awkward to walk in however. By the mid ’60s the toe was reduced to a rounder almond shape toe to everyone’srelief. 1964 Two Tone Oxford Flats
  17. 17. Flats came in all sorts of designs including loafers, moccasins, saddle shoes, lace up oxfords, single or multi straps, T straps, monk straps, slingbacks, mules, and wedges. Basicallyif the shoe came in a heeled version before the 1960s it now was a flat. In my opinion these ’60s flats are really fun and cute to wear. Maybe without the pointy toes but to have so many design choices without heels was a good step in footwear history.
  18. 18. Pointy Toe Flats and Slip Ons 1960s Mary Jane Shoes Of all flats and heels in the 1960s the early years embraced the return of the dancing shoe of the ’20s and ’30s. With sturdy cuban heel, shapely body and thin straps, they made a women’slegs look like thin dancers legs. Heel height varied from 2-3 inch pumpsto low 1/2 to 1.5 flat heels. It was one of the few styles of high heels to remain in fashion for most of the 1960s.
  19. 19. Baby Doll Style with Mary Jane Shoes The doll face look of the early 1960s made the classic Mary Jane shoes even more popular. With a single strap across the vamp, round toe, and short cuban heel it was very “cute” and quite comfortable too. Paired with thick white stockings and an empire top mini dress the doll look was complete.
  20. 20. Mary Janes came in solid colors as well as two tone combinations. Black shoes accented in white had been on trend for 50 years. Almost any color shoe with white trim was now worn in the 1960s as well as dark on dark colors (ie brown on black.) Straps started out thin in the early years and becamewider with heavy buckles by the mid 60s. Multi strap Mary Jane shoes also had a presence in the ’60s. Single and multi strap Mary Janes e 1960s was a decade of sweeping change throughout the fashion world generating ideas and images which still appear modern today. Whereas fashion had previously been aimed at a
  21. 21. wealthy, mature elite, the tastes and preferences of young people now became important. At the beginning of the decade, the market was dominated by Parisian designers of expensive haute couturegarments. Formal suits for women underwent a structural changeresulting in looser lines and shorter skirts. Yet the shape of clothes was soon transformed by new ideas emerging from the London pop scene. In Britain, musical taste and styles of dress were closely linked and it was the mod look which first popularised the simple geometric shapes typical of the 1960s. By the mid-sixties, the flared A-line was in style for dresses, skirts and coats. Slim fitting, brightly coloured garments were sold cheaply in boutiquesall over 'Swinging London' and had tremendous influence throughout Europe and the US. Men's suits became sleeker and were often accessorised with bright, bold shirts and high- heeled boots. The flamboyant look was in, signalled by wider trousersand lapels, like those belonging to the blue checked Tommy Nutter suit seen below. Designersexperimented with shiny new waterproof materials with a modern
  22. 22. look like PVC and perspex. Paco Rabanne pioneered dresses made from plastic discs and metal links which looked more like sculpture than clothing. Street Style Mini dress, Mary Quant, 1964. Museum no. T.353- 1974. © Victoria & Albert Museum, London Young people's incomewas at its highest since the end of the Second World War, creating the desire for a wardrobe which did morethan simply copy adult dress. The clothes aimed specifically at young people which Mary Quant had been designing since the late 1950s became popular.
  23. 23. Boutiques, like Quant's Bazaar and Barbara Hulanicki's Biba provided inexpensively made clothing suited to a busy, urban lifestyle. Instead of buying outfits designed for specific occasions or times of the day, people preferred separates which they could combine in different ways. The miniskirt was the mosteye-catching garment of the decade, designed for an ideally skinny femaleform. Women wore pale foundation and emphasised their eyes with kohl, mascara and false eyelashes. Hair was long and straight or worn in a shaped bob or wedge, as invented by the hairdresser Vidal Sassoon. Designers of clothes and textiles celebrated modernity. Space-age silver was mixed with primary coloured printstaken from Pop and Op Art. Novel fashion materials were introduced, including shiny, wet-look PVC, easy-care acrylics and polyesters.
  24. 24. The Peacock Revolution Suit, Tommy Nutter, 1969. Museum no. T.75 :1-3- 1996. © Victoria & Albert Museum, London Perhaps the most remarkable development in 1960s dress was the dramatic change in menswear. For the past 150 years, clothing for men had been tailor-made and plain and dark in appearance. Now, following trends which first appeared in gay fashions, colourful elements were introduced, such as the collarless jacket, worn with slim-fitting trousersand boots. During the mid-1960s frills and cravats came back in, together with vividly printed shirts. Finally, lapels and trousers took on exaggeratedlywide dimensions. Clothing
  25. 25. becameincreasinglyunisex as men and women shopped at the same boutiques for similar items. Textiles Heal's, Hull Traders and Conran Fabrics all bought patterns from young freelance designers who took their inspiration from contemporary art and graphics like Andy Warhol's Pop images and the dazzling Op art paintings of Bridget Riley. Brightly coloured large-scale geometric repeats were favourites for both dress and furnishing fabrics. Later in the decade, floral patterns were seen everywhere. Victorian decor was rediscovered and motifsborrowed from Art Nouveau and Art Deco were given a new lease of life by the addition of psychedeliccolours.
  26. 26. Kaftan, Zandra Rhodes, 1969. Museum no. T.358- 1974. © Victoria & Albert Museum, London During the late 1960s, there was a reaction against the mass production of mod clothing and pop products which had brought bright new styles into European and American homes and wardrobes. Somepeople became disillusioned by this materialistic mood and turned to Eastern cultures and mythologies which appeared more in tune with the 'natural' world. North American influences dominated during the later part of the decade. Journalist Tom Wolfe's 'The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test' and the film 'Easy Rider' examined a counter culture which had its roots in the West Coast of America. The end of the decade saw worldwide anti-Vietnam War protests. Meanwhile in France, students and workers united in violent uprisings against De Gaulle's conservative government. A cosmopolitan view was reflected in fashion by Ossie Clark, Jean Muir, Thea Porter and Zandra Rhodes, all of whom experimented with non- traditional tailoring and colourful prints, showing an interest in ethnic garments. Secondhand attire was sought after and even items like
  27. 27. military dress were worn for their decorative qualities. Shopping Boots, Barbara Hulanicki, 1969-70. Museum no. T.67+A-1985. © Victoria & Albert Museum, London Shops played an important part in popularising new fashions. Whole areas of London like the King's Road and Carnaby Street were transformed as boutiques took over. Boutiques sold an inexpensive range of rapidly changing outfits and offered an informal atmosphere and self-service, unlike traditional clothes shops.
  28. 28. At the same time, quirkyinterior decorationsand pop musiclent the boutique an individuality which was lacking in the newly built chain stores which were taking over the high street. John Stephen was one of the first to open a boutique selling menswear on Carnaby Street. Demand was such that he ended up owning eight moreshops in the same location. Meanwhile, Michael Fish established Mr. Fish, selling psychedelic-inspired outfits provocatively close to Savile Row. Exotically named outlets opening their doors on the King's Road included Bazaar and Michael Rainey's Hung On You. Other Chelsea shops were Nigel Waymouth's Granny Takes A Trip, where fashionable hippies shopped for antique clothing, and Quorum run by Ossie Clark and Alice Pollock. Biba's first premises were an old chemist's shop in Kensington, but the business eventuallyexpanded to take over a huge 1930s- built department store on Kensington High Street, where Barbara Hulanicki held parties in the roof garden.
  29. 29. Changes in men’s fashion in the 1960s were just as drastic for men as they were for women. Like women, men wore basicallythe same thing in the early 60s as they did in the late 50s. By 1964, though, things started to change. One change that is quite noticeable, the pants becamemuch tighter. The fit around the thigh was sporty and not at all the relaxed fit that men were accustomed to. The pea coat was quite popular for men in the mid-60s. Well, basically anything that looked straight outta London was good to go in the mid- 60s. The Beatles were leading the way, as hair started to grow longer and pants fit tighter. Men still wore boots and hats.
  30. 30. The late 60s brought a whole new range of styles for men. In 1969 seeing a man wear a scarf was commonplace. But it wasn’t a big, wool scarf of today. It was a silk scarf that was tied like a loose tie. Check out the pictures below. It was a very effeminate look compared to fashions of the past. Also, men’s pants became flared at the bottom almost like women’spants. It’s quite clear that at that time, women’s clothes were becoming more masculinewhile men’s clothes were becoming more effeminate. And boy, was it groovy. (Sorry, had to say it.) Men’s Fashion Ads from Catalogs in the 1960s
  31. 31. Fashion in 1970 Hemlines were the headlines in 1970. Across the fashion industry, designersdropped skirt lengths anywherebetween the knee and ankle and called it the Midi Look or midi skirt. Either you midi’d or you didn’t. 1970 Fashion: “Stop the Midi” Pin Miniskirt lovers picketed New York City shops that carried the new length. After years of building short skirted wardrobes, they weren’t about to change now. Others thought the longer skirt aged them. Whatever the reason, the midi skirt was a debacle that sent the fashion industry spiraling downward. The midi was slightly differentthan long skirts from the 1950s. It was slit and slashed, laced-up or zipped-up, strapped or wrapped to one side and sometimes buttoned down the front. It flattered the young and thin most, because it emphasized a small midriff, waist and hips. How the leg met the hem was its most critical feature. Ponchos, gauchos and capes afforded a fashionable alternative to the midi. Mid-calf
  32. 32. length culottes called gaucho pants were the hit of many a fall fashion show. The Moroccan theme was big in 1970. Capes striped like bedspreads, along with folk- embroidered Hungarian peasant blousesgave fashion in 1970 a distinctly ethnic flavor. Accessories were worn from head to toe. They were most vital part of the new look. Chokers, dog collars and handcrafted neck ornaments replaced standard jewelry. Some new jewelry embraced natural elementslike wood, shells, stones, feathers, Indian beads and leather. Bags and purses were strapped tightly under the arm or worn in mailman fashion across the chest, much like they were in 2011. Boots were sold in numbers never before seen. Every type of boot imaginable was sold, in all shapes, sizes and materials. Pastels and vivid colors were much more subdued than in 1969. The midi came in somber shades like purple, grape, raisin, plum, murky green or indigo. Again, women didn’t like the midi.
  33. 33. Bill Blass was elected to the Coty Hall of Fame in 1970. 1970s Fashion for Men & Boys The fashion breakthroughs that began for men in the late 1960s continued into the 1970s. For years, men’s fashion changed very little. Hair styles changed morethan clothes, and most differencesyou find are subtle. Starting in the mid-60s, men’s pants became more slim fitting. This was a huge departure from previous years. The changes kept on coming and by 1972 it was normal to see a man in low-risebell bottomsand platform shoes. This outfit would have been heartily laughed at just ten years before. Men’s clothing got tighter and tighter. A large portion of the clothes from this era were made of
  34. 34. polyester or a blend of cotton and polyester. Later in the decade, velour and terry cloth becamea very popular choice of fabric for men’s shirts. Two very different types of suits were loved by men of the 1970s. First, the leisure suit, which was introduced around 1972, exploded in popularity after John Travolta’s smash hit “Saturday Night Fever.” The other suit was the track suit. Although the track suit is more often associated with the 80s (as worn by the Beastie Boys, for example), they were quite popular in the late 70s. In fact, sportswear in general was worn almost everywhere. Men weren’t wearing hats anymore, their hair was much longer and they didn’t always tuck their shirts in. Facial hair was great, but if you didn’t have chest hair then you better get a really big, gold medallion to cover up your bare chest. Collarswere wide and the pants were tight. That’s men’s fashion in the seventies, baby. 1970s Men’s Fashion Advertisementsfrom Catalogs
  35. 35. Fashion in the 1980s 1980s fashion can be commended for its creativity. Some fashion designersabandoned history, someborrowed from it, while others tried to design the future. Designers abandoned all convention — and their creations were interesting to say the least. The early 80s were somewhat subdued in color, where we see a lot browns and tans and oranges. Blocky shapes were everywhere and dressing like a tennis player was the cool thing to do. Velour was hot and velvet was even hotter. For both men and women, the waistline was a little high.
  36. 36. But let’s face it, early 1980s fashion was very similar to the late 1970s. In 1983 there was a slight 1950s-style throwback, especially in women’s dresses. By the mid-80s, pop music stars like Cyndi Lauper were ushering in an entirely new style — one that many people associate with the 1980s to this day. Bright colored accessories like sunglasses, bangles and hoop earrings were a necessity. Teased hair, loud makeup and neon were an important part of this style. This style was obviously more popular with the younger crowd. But that didn’t mean “regular” women in the 1980s couldn’t have fun. It was an exceptionally flexible time when a woman could wear skin- tight cotton stirrup pants with leggings and a giant turtleneck sweater one day — and parachute pants with a small v-neck top and a high-waist belt the next. Society’s love for brand was epitomized by its inexplicable love for wearing Coca-Cola brand clothing in 1987. MTV had a huge impacton fashion, as teens across the U.S. were tuning in to watch music videos starring wildly dressed celebrities. Suddenly it becamemuch easier for
  37. 37. a fad to spread across the country faster than wildfire. By the late 80s, Nike had grown into one of the most profitable clothing companies in the world. Like Coke vs. Pepsi, Reebok vs. Nike was the athletic wear battle of the decade. With the help of Michael Jordan, Nike won the war. In 1988, every kid had to have a pair of Air Jordans and a Chicago Bulls baseball cap. If you ever hear someone talk about “Cosby sweaters”, they are referring to sweaters that were most popular in 1989. By then, women’s clothing had gotten considerablymore baggy as women clamored for styles that hearkened back to a more conservative time. The best example of late-1980s for boys is Zack Morris (Mark-Paul Gosselaar) from Saved by the Bell. One look at a 1989 catalog feels like a glimpse into the troublemaking teen’s bedroom floor.
  38. 38. Fashion for Men & Boys Men’s fashion in the 1980s ranged from ultra sleek and modern to downright embarrassing. Don’t believe us? Look at some of the pictures below. Men’s clothing in the eighties was snug fitting and comfortable. Soft fabrics were everywhere and, while they clothes were still tight compared to today, they weren’t skin tight like the seventies. Activewear was a popular choice for men and boys alike. Matching sweatpants and sweatshirts flew off the shelves for the entire decade. Especially sportswear that supported pro sports
  39. 39. teams. NFL-licensed clothing dominated schoolyards across the United States. If a boy wasn’t wearing NFL clothing, then he was sporting a sweatshirt featuring his favorite cartoon character or superhero. Teenage boys wore lots and lots of denim. Denim jackets were complimented by matching denim jeans. Also corduroy pants were a hot item. Athletic shoes were becoming a fashion symbol, climaxing with the popularity of Nike Air Jordan shoes in the late 80s. A good pair of Jordans was nicely complimented by a Starter jacket in 1989. Men in the early 1980s loved wearing long sleeve velour shirts. Wrangler and Levi’s were the jeans makersof choice. Turtlenecks were incredibly popular throughoutthe decade, especially when worn under an wild-colored thick, itchy sweater. In the early 80s, men rocked a thick mustache, but by the end of the decade they had become much less popular. Chest hair and gold medallionswere not exposed much past 1984, except by your creepy uncle.
  40. 40. Men’s suits were relatively conservative, seeminglythe only clothing in the eighties that wasn’t drowned in bright colors. Advertisement 1980s Men’s Fashion Pictures
  41. 41. Fashion in 1980 Women’s clothing in 1980 ran the gamutfrom conservative to opulentfantasy. Many designers reached back in history for inspiration. The looked to the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Victorian era and even the Peruvian Indians for something “new.” A few avant-gardedesigners took their cues from futurism and designed clothes that looked like uniforms for space travel. 1980 witnessed a revival of the classic “preppie” look that began in New England prep schools in the 40s and 50s. International fashion was influenced by American sportswear more so in 1980 than it had been since the jeans of the 60s. Western clothes began to make a comeback as well. China saw its first American fashion show in 1980, when Halston presented his large collection. Chinese reactions ranged from polite admiration to outright dismay. Designers did what they could to try to please women. They opted for choice. Hemlines
  42. 42. bounced up and down and there was no prescribed length — day or night. Shapes ranged from slim to extremely full and blousons returned. Velvet was popular around the clock and women wore lace with tweeds and leather. Clothes could be made of any color, with emphasis on blocks and asymmetrical bands of two or more colors. Men’s dressing styles changed very little in 1980. One noticeable development for men’s fashion was that it was becoming moreacceptable for men to wear sport coats and slacks to events that previously required a suit. Fashion in the 1990s
  43. 43. Fashion in the early 1990s was generally loose fitting and colorful. Unlessyou were going for the grunge look, then color was the enemy. Who remembers pegging Skidz pants bought from Merry Go Round? We had to wear Air Jordans, too. Our t-shirts were big and our shorts were extra long. The tapered pants were a big deal. If they weren’t tapered, then you had to taper them yourself with a fold and a couple flips. Boys and girls both wore baseball caps in many different ways. Mullets were stylish for a couple years and every sweater had a turtleneck under it. But then grunge happened. Suddenly every thrift store in town couldn’t keep a flannel shirt in stock to save their backs. Teens were digging through dad’s box of old clothes to get their hands on some authentic hole-ridden jeans to wear over top of their long john stockings. Barbers nearly went out of business because no one under 17 got their hair cut any more (OK, we may be exaggerating just a little.)
  44. 44. Also in the early nineties fashionsworn by hop hop artists were becoming increasingly mainstream. And because of the growing popularity of hip hop music among the suburban community, urban styles were seen everywhere, not just in the big city. By the late 1990s hip hop style was arguably the most popular among young people. Starting in the mid-90s, industrial and military styles crept into mainstream fashion. People were finding any way to make a fashion accessory out of a piece of machinery. Camouflage pants were ironically worn by anti- war protesters. By the late 90s, rave culture swept through and people were looking for clothes that were more glamorousagain. The grungy styles of the early nineties were old hat. Looking rich was cool again. Name brand designers were back in a big way. Interestingly enough, late 90s clothing styles are not too drastically different than they are today. In the 1990s, musicians had a much greater influence on what young people wore than designers. All a kid in Kansas had to do was turn
  45. 45. on MTV for the latest east and west coast styles of the moment. For significantly more detail about a certain year in 1990s fashion, click on the plus sign next to the year below. 1980s Fashion for Women & Girls Fashion for women evolved quite dramatically during the 1980s. From dresses to fabrics to hairstyles, virtually nothing went unchanged. But it wasn’t that way immediately. Catalogs from 1980 don’t differ a whole lot from 1983, but once you hit 1985, watch out. You can almost smell the hairspray from the pictures alone.
  46. 46. In the early 1980s, women preferred soft fabrics and neutral colors. It was almost as if color was the enemy and beige was the only option. Don’t get us wrong; brown, tan and pale orange were in style as well. The neon that made 1980s fashion so famous had yet to becomethe norm. Around that timemost every woman owned a turtleneck or six, and scarves made a huge comeback in the early 80s. Silk blouses were all the rage throughoutthe entire decade. Pants were a very popular option for all women, and many styles were sold. Denim jeans were hot, arriving in styles with wild bleaching, dyeing and even some really expensivedesigner jeans came with pre-made holes in them. This very fact made youth fashion the butt of many jokes with the older set. Most dress pants were high- waisted, pleated and snug fitting. Throughout the decade, elaborate licensed prints featuring cartoon and movie characters were much more popular than in decades before. Garfield, Warner Brothers and even E.T. enjoyed staggering profits due to inexpensiveproduction combined with surging demand.
  47. 47. The mid- to late-eighties were a period of experimentation. From fabrics that changed color to clothes meant to be worn backwards, nothing was off limits. Bright neon colors were very popular and rocking brand names was more important than ever. Belts and bracelets were the most vital accessories in the wardrobe. Advertisement Fashion in 1990 In 1990, recession-wearyshoppers chose to spend money on clothes that would stay in style as long as possible. That meant that the wild shapes and colors of recent years needed to be toned down. The jacket remained the key to daytime dress. A trend setter in the jacket trend was Chanel, who introduced loose versions of the famous Chanel jacket slit vertically at the hem. Some were bright colors like hot pink, tangerine and white. Other leaders were Giorgio Armani, and Calvin Klein.
  48. 48. 1990 Fashion: Vogue Magazine Cover The biggest difference in 1990 fashion was an explosion of color, with alarming arrays of bright yellow, orange, red, purple and green. Neon bright colors could be obvious as the primary color of a pair of pants — or they could be subtle as the color of a pair of shoestrings. Brocade, embroidered satins and laces were important, but the most popular style of eveningwear was the slender black dress, worn quite short with black stockings and high-heeled shoes. In the winter of 1990 the short, swingy coat was worn in full force. Women loved how racy the coat looked over short skirts. Casual styles,
  49. 49. such as anoraks and parkas were prominently seen in cold-weather climates. A revival of the interest in made-to-order clothing occurred in 1990 when women realized that it wasn’t more expensive than ready-to-wear clothing. Thissurprised many fashion analysts and drew other designers to New York City, following the success of Arnold Scaasi. 1990s Fashion for Women & Girls Women and girls fashion in the 1990s is very distinct. While not quite as loud as the eighties, the nineties took that attitude and tried to be a little smarter and a little classier. Sometimes designers succeeded, sometimes they didn’t.
  50. 50. Some common itemsof clothing from the 1990s: black leggings with oversized sweater, low heel shoes, flannel shirts, denim everything, t-shirts, sweatpants, skirts, Birkenstocks, solid colors, silk shirts, turtlenecks (under cardigans or sweaters), plain white Keds and armysurplus clothing to namea few. Like most decades, fashion changed somewhat drastically from the beginning of the nineties to the end. The early nineties started off exactly like 1989, but by 1993, the 1991 look was “so 80s.” Simplyput, nearly everyone had completely revamped their style by 1994. By the middle of the decade, many young women were wearing the same clothes their moms wore in high school. The seventies look was really hot, with teens wearing tie dye shirts, bell-bottom jeans and long, straight hair. Homemade jewelry and, to a lesser degree, self- designed clothing, was very popular. By then, the eighties had become a bad thing. Hair spray was eighties. Too much makeup was eighties. Flashy clothing was eighties. Anything eighties was considered a bad thing. Most women didn’t want wild patterns and colors, they
  51. 51. wanted simple and humble. Solid colors, preferably subdued was the way to go. Share your love for 1990s Fashion for Women & Girls As the decade progressed, fashion became more similar to what you saw throughout the 2000s. The grunge look faded away and sexy madea comeback. Tight clothing was worn again and glamour was ever slowly inching its way back into the fashion world. Which was great news for fashion designers, who had grown tired trying to make flannel look good. We have a bunch of pictures from a 1993 catalog below. We will put up morein the near future so you can get a better idea of how the decade progressed, but hopefully you can enjoy these for now. Advertisement 1990s Women’s Fashion Pictures

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