First among Equals How to Manage a Group of Professionals  AUTHOR:  Patrick J. Mckenna and David H. Meister  PUBLISHER:  S...
<ul><li>Imagine this:   </li></ul><ul><ul><li>step-by-step instructional narrative on how to effectively manage a group of...
<ul><li>any new task comes a responsibility to understand and prepare  for it as best as you can. . </li></ul><ul><li>Clar...
4.) Input on the compensation of members. 5.) Valuing everyone’s non-reimbursed time. 6.) What you need from your firm lea...
Once you’ve figured out your strengths and weaknesses in this area, you can start implementing your action plan as follows...
Dare to be Inspiring  Here are some important questions for reflection: 1.) Do you show a genuine interest in what your gr...
<ul><ul><li>You must now focus on developing your skills in dealing with individual members of your group.  </li></ul></ul...
<ul><ul><li>Here are some basic steps with which you can coach your members without them becoming too territorial: </li></...
<ul><li>Listen to Build Rapport </li></ul><ul><li>You might be surprised at how different your opinion is from  the percep...
  - Repeated yawn, looking at one’s watch, giving “Yes, but…”  responses, or not responding to the topic at hand. Differen...
Part Two - Coaching the Individual   <ul><li>Help Underperformers </li></ul><ul><li>- It is inevitable in any group that t...
Part Two - Coaching the Individual   <ul><li>However, despite repeated attempts to improve performance, some individuals s...
Part Two - Coaching the Individual   <ul><li>Several steps to resolve these problems: </li></ul><ul><li>- Describe specifi...
Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Throw Down a Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>- You need to emphasize this goal’s import...
Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Energize your Meetings </li></ul><ul><li>The following are eight (8) interrelated p...
Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Give Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>A guide when you feel the urge to express recogn...
Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Resolve Interpersonal Conflicts </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts among group members can...
Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Here are some steps to resolve conflict: </li></ul><ul><li>- Describe the conflict ...
Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Nurture your Juniors </li></ul><ul><li>- The success of their training lies on...
Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>The Work Supervision System   </li></ul><ul><li>- Refers to the process by whi...
Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Integrate New People </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some steps to integrate new ad...
Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Measure Group Results </li></ul><ul><li>- One of the few ground rules that you...
Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Assessing Financial Performance </li></ul><ul><li>- A balance must be found an...
BusinessSummaries.com is a business book Summaries service.  Every week, it sends out to subscribers a 9- to 12-page summa...
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First Among Equals

  1. 2. First among Equals How to Manage a Group of Professionals AUTHOR: Patrick J. Mckenna and David H. Meister PUBLISHER: Simon & Schuster DATE OF PUBLICATION: 2002 NUMBER OF PAGES: 320 pages Book pic
  2. 3. <ul><li>Imagine this: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>step-by-step instructional narrative on how to effectively manage a group of professionals. . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>It will also work for the veterans who may pick up a lesson or two from leaders, career experts and other regular people whose actual experiences are used as concrete, real-world examples. </li></ul></ul>THE BIG IDEA
  3. 4. <ul><li>any new task comes a responsibility to understand and prepare for it as best as you can. . </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify Your Role </li></ul><ul><li>A group leader entails your transition from focusing on individual to collective performance. </li></ul><ul><li>A change in attitude on your part is required to take satisfaction in the success of the group. </li></ul><ul><li>It also helps when you and your team come to a written agreement regarding specific functions you take on as the leader in the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm your Mandate </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some rules to operate under: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Time to do the job. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Your right to coach. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Your performance criteria and compensation. </li></ul>Part One - Getting Ready
  4. 5. 4.) Input on the compensation of members. 5.) Valuing everyone’s non-reimbursed time. 6.) What you need from your firm leader Build Relationships One at a Time Here are some questions for self-evaluation: 1.) How many of those that you have the responsibility to coach would consider you their trusted advisor? 2.) Do you actually like the people you are coaching – and do they know you like them? 3.) Do the people you are seeking to coach actually view you as being someone who cares about others? Do they think you care specifically about them? 4.) Can you help your people visualize and articulate their dream? 5.) Are you investing time towards building a strong relationship? 6.) Do people feel comfortable admitting their flaws to you? 7.) Do you always act and offer your advice in the best interests of your people? Part One - Getting Ready
  5. 6. Once you’ve figured out your strengths and weaknesses in this area, you can start implementing your action plan as follows: 1.) Schedule time to meet informally (no agenda) with each person. 2.) Discuss their career goals, ambitions and desires. 3.) Look for your opportunity to obtain “nagging rights” (your privilege as a group leader to hold accountable and demand the achievement of a goal from a volunteering member. Part One - Getting Ready
  6. 7. Dare to be Inspiring Here are some important questions for reflection: 1.) Do you show a genuine interest in what your group members want to achieve? 2.) Do you show an interest in the things that mean the most to your people in their personal lives? 3.) Are you there for your people in their times of personal or professional crisis? 4.) Do you informally “check in” with each of your people every so often? 5.) Do you offer to help when some member of your group clearly needs it? Part One - Getting Ready
  7. 8. <ul><ul><li>You must now focus on developing your skills in dealing with individual members of your group. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You cannot build a relationship with the group until you learn how to interact with each member. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Win Permission to Coach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Coaching is an activity where you, as the group leader, offer options, assistance and guidance, as the situation requires, to your members. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Creating a safe environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Also advisable if you want your members comfortable enough to grow and hone their skills. </li></ul></ul>Part Two - Coaching the Individual
  8. 9. <ul><ul><li>Here are some basic steps with which you can coach your members without them becoming too territorial: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1.) Ask how things are going. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2.) Confirm that the individual is ready for coaching. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>3.) Ask questions to clarify the situation and offer your support and help. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>4.) Offer information as appropriate. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>5.) Listen actively. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>6.) Help this person identify possible courses of action. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>7.) Agree on the next step. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>8.) Offer your personal support. </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Part Two - Coaching the Individual Build homegrown management.
  9. 10. <ul><li>Listen to Build Rapport </li></ul><ul><li>You might be surprised at how different your opinion is from the perception others have about you </li></ul><ul><li>These critical steps will help you to listen actively: </li></ul><ul><li>- Ask questions and encourage dialogue. </li></ul><ul><li>- Listen intently, making a written note of the situation, problem or request. </li></ul><ul><li>- Summarize and paraphrase your colleague’s situation, problem or request. </li></ul><ul><li>Dealing with bad listeners: </li></ul><ul><li>- Avoiding eye contact or continually responding with a vacant stare. </li></ul><ul><li>- Appearing absorbed in other activities or allowing interruptions to disrupt the conversation. </li></ul>Part Two - Coaching the Individual
  10. 11. - Repeated yawn, looking at one’s watch, giving “Yes, but…” responses, or not responding to the topic at hand. Different techniques that effective coaches employ to deal with them: - The Direct Approach - The Preventative Approach - The Therapeutic Approach - The Punitive Approach - The Indirect Approach Deal Differently with Different People - One of the challenges that you will be facing is how to reach each member of your group. Part Two - Coaching the Individual
  11. 12. Part Two - Coaching the Individual <ul><li>Help Underperformers </li></ul><ul><li>- It is inevitable in any group that there are people who are not pulling their own weight </li></ul><ul><li>This is where your other skills, like active listening, come in: </li></ul><ul><li>- Set up a meeting to discuss the performance issue that concerns you. </li></ul><ul><li>- Reassure the person of your confidence in them and your desire to be supportive. </li></ul><ul><li>- Get agreement that a performance issue exists and discuss its causes. </li></ul><ul><li>- Identify and discuss any obstacles to performance beyond the individual’s control. </li></ul><ul><li>- Seek ideas for improvement. </li></ul><ul><li>- Mutually agree on specific actions to be taken to solve the performance issue. </li></ul><ul><li>- Set a specific follow-up date to review progress. </li></ul>
  12. 13. Part Two - Coaching the Individual <ul><li>However, despite repeated attempts to improve performance, some individuals still continue to fail. You are left with the following options: </li></ul><ul><li>- You can choose to avoid the problem and let firm management deal with it. </li></ul><ul><li>- You can suggest that the individual may be better served moving to some other practice area. </li></ul><ul><li>- You can warn this personal that you are being left in the unfortunate position of recommending a salary reduction. </li></ul><ul><li>- You can lobby the firm to terminate this person. </li></ul><ul><li>Tackle the Primadonnas </li></ul><ul><li>- Brilliant with generating revenue and surpassing client satisfaction but can be totally disruptive to the precarious harmony within a group setting. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Part Two - Coaching the Individual <ul><li>Several steps to resolve these problems: </li></ul><ul><li>- Describe specific situations that illustrate the behavior you are concerned about. </li></ul><ul><li>- Explain why it concerns you and express your desire for change. </li></ul><ul><li>- Seek out and listen to the individual’s reasons for this behavior. </li></ul><ul><li>- Help the individual see how improved behavior will improve his or her career. </li></ul><ul><li>- Ask for ideas and commitment to solving the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>- Offer your encouragement and support. </li></ul><ul><li>- Agree on an action plan and set a date to discuss progress. </li></ul><ul><li>Build Support for Change </li></ul><ul><li>- It is best that you talk to them individually first before meeting with them as a group. </li></ul>
  14. 15. Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Throw Down a Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>- You need to emphasize this goal’s importance and present an action plan based on existing facts and real needs. </li></ul><ul><li>The following process is set as an example: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Ask the members of your group to articulate what’s in it for them. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Give everyone the opportunity to stand up and declare his or her personal commitment. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Focus first on what you can do now, with existing resources. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Encourage experimentation. </li></ul><ul><li>5.) Build for an early success to continue the momentum. </li></ul><ul><li>6.) Search continually for opportunities for people to create or outdo themselves. </li></ul><ul><li>7.) Set unreasonable expectations. </li></ul><ul><li>8.) Focus on the excitement of the endeavor. </li></ul>
  15. 16. Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Energize your Meetings </li></ul><ul><li>The following are eight (8) interrelated principles that together will energize these meetings and make them far more effective: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Set a singular focus. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) “Brainstorm” ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Ensure ideas are actionable. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Get “voluntary” commitments. </li></ul><ul><li>5.) Keep commitments small. </li></ul><ul><li>6.) Establish your “contracts for action”. </li></ul><ul><li>7.) Follow up between meetings. </li></ul><ul><li>8.) Celebrate successes. </li></ul>
  16. 17. Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Give Recognition </li></ul><ul><li>A guide when you feel the urge to express recognition. </li></ul><ul><li>- Decide what actions are worthy of recognition. </li></ul><ul><li>- Do it only when appropriate. </li></ul><ul><li>- Determine the appropriate method and form for extending your recognition. </li></ul><ul><li>- Deal with each individual in a manner that fits his or her personal style. </li></ul><ul><li>- Institute and “Awards Program” within your group. </li></ul><ul><li>- Prepare an “Accomplishments” report for your group. </li></ul>
  17. 18. Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Resolve Interpersonal Conflicts </li></ul><ul><li>Conflicts among group members can take several forms: </li></ul><ul><li>- “Chronic bickering” between two members of the team. </li></ul><ul><li>- Verbal abuse or a harmful “put-down” remark that diminishes or demeans other individuals, their opinions or ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>- “Finding fault”, publicly, with the work, performance, attitude or almost anything another colleague does. </li></ul><ul><li>- An icy coolness between a couple of group members such that they eliminate all but the most formal of interactions, ignore each other when speaking, and give each other the cold shoulder or “silent treatment” . </li></ul>
  18. 19. Part Three - Coaching the Team <ul><li>Here are some steps to resolve conflict: </li></ul><ul><li>- Describe the conflict and the nonproductive behavior you are observing. </li></ul><ul><li>- Ask each person to comment on the cause of the disagreement. </li></ul><ul><li>- Have each person, in turn; summarize what he or she heard the other person say. </li></ul><ul><li>- Ask each person, in turn, to identify points of agreement and disagreement. </li></ul><ul><li>- Invite your colleagues to suggest ways to proceed. </li></ul><ul><li>Deal with your Crises </li></ul><ul><li>Basic principles to get you started: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Calmly attempt to get at the facts. </li></ul><ul><li>2.)Identify the real problem. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Decide who should handle the crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Involve everyone where possible. </li></ul><ul><li>5.) Remember that, in a crisis, everything is magnified. </li></ul>
  19. 20. Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Nurture your Juniors </li></ul><ul><li>- The success of their training lies on your ability to pick the right work assignments and implement an effective supervision system for them. </li></ul><ul><li>The Work Assignment System </li></ul><ul><li>Generally applied in two ways: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) When a senior or a collective group of senior leaders selects from a pool of juniors to assign a particular task. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) When a senior takes on a single junior to act as his apprentice.. </li></ul>
  20. 21. Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>The Work Supervision System </li></ul><ul><li>- Refers to the process by which a senior monitors his apprentice’s progress, while at the same time, gets evaluated in turn by the Group Leader (you). </li></ul><ul><li>Mentors or a Good Mentoring System </li></ul><ul><li>- Mostly benefits your junior colleagues although it also frees up your time as you delegate the responsibility of training them to your senior colleagues. </li></ul><ul><li>Hiring Process </li></ul><ul><li>- Consider qualifications and other accomplishments but do not forget to review their previous work backgrounds and non-work related activities. </li></ul>
  21. 22. Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Integrate New People </li></ul><ul><li>Here are some steps to integrate new additions: </li></ul><ul><li>1.) Manage first impressions. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) Give them support – before they ask. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) Make them feel valued. </li></ul><ul><li>4.) Provide an immersion experience. </li></ul><ul><li>5.) Communicate, communicate, communicate </li></ul><ul><li>Control your Group’s Size </li></ul><ul><li>How do you deal with your group size: </li></ul><ul><li> 1.) Downsize your groups. </li></ul><ul><li> 2.) Use a “resource member” approach. </li></ul><ul><li> 3.) Create “splinter” groups. </li></ul>
  22. 23. Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Measure Group Results </li></ul><ul><li>- One of the few ground rules that you needed to establish was the method by which your group’s performance will be measured. </li></ul><ul><li>Conducting a group self-evaluation. </li></ul><ul><li>- To assess your group’s success, celebrate it and subsequently formulate action plans for the future. </li></ul><ul><li>Questionnaires </li></ul><ul><li>- To test the culture and behavior of your group. It is also advisable to circulate another questionnaire regarding your effectiveness as a group leader. </li></ul>
  23. 24. Part Four - Building for the Future <ul><li>Assessing Financial Performance </li></ul><ul><li>- A balance must be found and it takes a good amount of thinking on your part to get the right set of outcome measures for the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Why Bother? </li></ul><ul><li>Why should you take on the role? </li></ul><ul><li>1.) You have only taken on additional responsibility, not totally absconded from your initial and primary tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>2.) By being a group leader, you have developed a whole new range of skills (listening, empathizing, understanding, influencing others, etc.) that otherwise you may not have tapped. </li></ul><ul><li>3.) The satisfaction that you get from knowing that you have left a great impact on another person’s life is immeasurable. </li></ul>
  24. 25. BusinessSummaries.com is a business book Summaries service. Every week, it sends out to subscribers a 9- to 12-page summary of a best-selling business book chosen from among the hundreds of books printed out in the United States. For more information, please go to http://www.bizsum.com. ABOUT BUSINESSSUMMARIES

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