Romeo and juliet review

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Romeo and juliet review

  1. 1. Romeo and Juliet
  2. 2. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? ABRAM
  3. 3. ABRAM = MONTAGUE
  4. 4. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? BALTHASAR
  5. 5. BALTHASAR = MONTAGUE
  6. 6. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? BENVOLIO
  7. 7. BENVOLIO = MONTAGUE
  8. 8. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? FRIAR JOHN
  9. 9. FRIAR JOHN = NEUTRAL
  10. 10. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? FRIAR LAWRENCE
  11. 11. FRIAR LAWRENCE = MONTAGUE The Friar counts as a Montague because he’s a Montague, a close confidant of Romeo, before anything else. Though, yes, it’s true. Later he helps both Romeo and Juliet and hopes for a reconciliation between the two families.
  12. 12. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? GREGORY
  13. 13. GREGORY = CAPULET
  14. 14. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? PETER
  15. 15. PETER = CAPULET
  16. 16. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? JULIET
  17. 17. JULIET = CAPULET
  18. 18. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? MERCUTIO
  19. 19. MERCUTIO = MONTAGUE
  20. 20. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? NURSE
  21. 21. NURSE = CAPULET Just like Friar Lawrence, the Nurse in the exposition of the play is clearly aligned with just one family – in this case the Capulets – but later does things to assist a member of the other family as well. In the end, though, she’s a Capulet through and through, telling Juliet she should just “marry with the County.”
  22. 22. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? PARIS
  23. 23. PARIS = CAPULET
  24. 24. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? PRINCE ESCALUS
  25. 25. PRINCE ESCALUS = NEUTRAL
  26. 26. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? ROMEO
  27. 27. ROMEO = MONTAGUE
  28. 28. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? SAMPSON
  29. 29. SAMPSON = CAPULET
  30. 30. Capulet, Montague, or Neutral? TYBALT
  31. 31. TYBALT = CAPULET
  32. 32. In the prologue before Act I, Romeo and Juliet are referred to as . . .
  33. 33. Romeo and Juliet meet …
  34. 34. As the play opens, Romeo is sad because . . .
  35. 35. The nurse functions as . . .
  36. 36. The Friar agrees to marry Romeo and Juliet because . . .
  37. 37. Tybalt becomes furious at Romeo when he . . .
  38. 38. When Mercutio says, “’tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door…,” he is referring to . . .
  39. 39. “’ Tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door, but ‘tis enough. ‘Twill serve. Ask for me tomorrow, and you shall find me a grave man.” How many literary devices can you find in these lines?
  40. 40. Mercutio fights with Tybalt because . . .
  41. 41. Mercutio is stabbed when . . .
  42. 42. Romeo’s treatment of the mortally wounded Paris demonstrates . . .
  43. 43. Juliet gets her poison from __________ and Romeo gets his from __________.
  44. 44. Juliet’s life ends when she . . .
  45. 45. Balthasar is Romeo’s . . .
  46. 46. To which city does Romeo go after being banished, and why was he exiled?
  47. 47. Who convinces Romeo to attend the masquerade ball at the Capulets?
  48. 48. What does the lark represent?
  49. 49. What bird represents the night?
  50. 50. Who first finds Juliet after she takes the potion that will make her appear dead?
  51. 51. Who proposes that a gold statue of Juliet be erected in Verona?
  52. 52. How and where does Romeo commit suicide?
  53. 53. Who is the last person to see Juliet alive?
  54. 54. Why is Friar John unable to deliver Friar Lawrence’s message to Romeo?
  55. 55. Why does the apothecary agree to sell Romeo the poison?
  56. 56. As this transaction occurs, the apothecary says to Romeo, “My poverty, but not my will, consents.” To this Romeo replies, “I [pay] thy poverty and not thy will.” This is an example of what literary device?
  57. 57. In the first two scenes of the play, Romeo was in love with . . .
  58. 58. Whom does Mercutio curse as he lay dying?
  59. 59. What line does Mercutio utter as he draws his last breath?
  60. 60. Who said it? “ Good night, good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow/ That I shall say good night till it be morrow.”
  61. 61. Juliet
  62. 62. Who said it? “ My child is yet a stranger in the world,/ She hath not seen the change of fourteen years;/ Let two more summers wither in their pride/ Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.”
  63. 63. Lady Capulet and/or the Nurse
  64. 64. To whom is he speaking? “ My child is yet a stranger in the world,/ She hath not seen the change of fourteen years;/ Let two more summers wither in their pride/ Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.”
  65. 65. Paris
  66. 66. What poetic device is being used? “ My child is yet a stranger in the world,/ She hath not seen the change of fourteen years;/ Let two more summers wither in their pride/ Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.”
  67. 67. Who said it? “ Out of her favor where I am in love.”
  68. 68. Romeo
  69. 69. To whom is he talking? “ Out of her favor where I am in love.”
  70. 70. Benvolio
  71. 71. About whom is he talking? “ Out of her favor where I am in love.”
  72. 72. Rosaline
  73. 73. Who said it? “ O Romeo, Romeo! Wherefore art thou Romeo?”
  74. 74. Juliet
  75. 75. Who said it? “ I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; / But no more deep will I endart mine eye/ than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”
  76. 76. Juliet
  77. 77. To whom is she speaking? “ I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; / But no more deep will I endart mine eye/ than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”
  78. 78. Lord Capulet
  79. 79. About whom is she speaking? “ I’ll look to like, if looking liking move; / But no more deep will I endart mine eye/ than your consent gives strength to make it fly.”
  80. 80. Paris
  81. 81. Who said it? “ A plague a both your houses!/ They have made worms’ meat of me.”
  82. 82. Mercutio
  83. 83. Who said it? “ Affliction is enamored of they parts,/ And thou art wedded to calamity.”
  84. 84. Friar Lawrence
  85. 85. Who said it? “ Ask for me tomorrow, and you/ Shall find me a grave man.”
  86. 86. Mercutio
  87. 87. Who said it? “ Young men’s love then lies/ Not truly in their hearts, but in their eyes.”
  88. 88. Friar Lawrence
  89. 89. Who said it? “ You say you do not know the lady’s mind./ Uneven is the course; I like it not.”
  90. 90. Friar Lawrence
  91. 91. To whom is he speaking? “ You say you do not know the lady’s mind./ Uneven is the course; I like it not.”
  92. 92. Paris
  93. 93. Who is speaking? “ I do protest I never injured thee, /But love thee better than thou canst devise/ Till thou salt know the reason of my love; / And so, good Capulet, which name I tender/ As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.”
  94. 94. Romeo
  95. 95. To whom is he speaking? “ I do protest I never injured thee, /But love thee better than thou canst devise/ Till thou salt know the reason of my love; / And so, good Capulet, which name I tender/ As dearly as mine own, be satisfied.”
  96. 96. Tybalt
  97. 97. Who is speaking? “ Where be these enemies? Capulet, Montague,/ See what a scourge is laid up on your hate,/ That heaven finds means to kill your joys with love.”
  98. 98. Prince Escalus

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