Is Twitter a Medium of Social Mobilization?

1,378 views

Published on

Is Twitter a Medium of Social Mobilization?
: An Exploratory Study of the Use of Twitaddons.com in South Korea

Published in: Technology, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,378
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
30
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Is Twitter a Medium of Social Mobilization?

  1. 1. Is Twitter a Medium of Social Mobilization? : An Exploratory Study of the Use of Twitaddons.com in South Korea Sujin Choi Dept. of Radio-Television-Film University of Texas at Austin, U.S.A. Ji-Young Park Master’s degree candidate Han Woo Park (corresponding author) Associate Professor, Dept. of Media & Communication Yeungnam University, South Korea Sunbelt XXXI, Florida, February 11, 2011
  2. 2. <ul><li>Brevity in messages / Mobility / Pervasive access / Broadcast nature (Zhao & Rosson, 2009) </li></ul><ul><li>Retweeting to spread Tweets to new audiences, publicly agree with someone, and validate others’ thoughts (boyd et al., 2010). </li></ul><ul><li>More focus on personal status update or interpersonal relationship </li></ul><ul><li>Recent use for social mobilization </li></ul>Why Twitter?
  3. 3. <ul><li>Launched on Mar. 4, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Added social gathering feature to Twitter </li></ul><ul><li> create and organize a party (“dang”) </li></ul><ul><li>108,876 tweets generated in Twitaddons.com, while 313,992 in the original Korean Twitter.com (July – Oct. 2010) </li></ul><ul><li>Automatically insert hashtags for effective communication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Inconvenience of using hashtags, particularly in terms of Twitter use in Korea  Automatic insertion of hashtags for effective communication </li></ul></ul>Twitaddons.com
  4. 4. Main Web page of Twitaddons.com
  5. 5. <ul><li>Twitter </li></ul><ul><li>Relational / Conversational use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Java et al. (2007), Krishnamurthy et al. (2008), Huberman et al. (2008) , Honeycutt and Herring (2009) , Zhao and Rosson (2009), boyd et al. (2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Informational use </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jansen et al. (2009), Hughes and Palen (2010) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social use (for social movement) ? </li></ul>Literature Review
  6. 6. <ul><li>Social Mobilization and the Internet </li></ul><ul><li>Positive impact on social mobilization for information and organizational functions (Klein, 1999; Van Aelst & Walgrave, 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Online deliberations of opinions? </li></ul><ul><li>Negative: Wilhelm (1998) , Sunstein (2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Positive: Kellner (2004), Langman (2005), Bennett & Iyengar (2008) </li></ul><ul><li>Phases of social mobilization </li></ul><ul><li>i) Distribution of information </li></ul><ul><li>ii) Organization of movements </li></ul><ul><li>iii) Formation of shared values </li></ul><ul><li>iv) Implementation of collective action </li></ul><ul><li>(Porta and Diani, 2006; Van Aelst and Walgrave, 2002; Shirky, 2008) </li></ul>Literature Review
  7. 7. RQ 1: What attributes do party organizers on Twitaddons.com have? RQ 2: In what ways is the activity of a party organizer against members different from that against followers in terms of information distribution and organization ? RQ 3: Do party members form shared values in accordance with the mission statement of the party? RQ4: Does the online activity of a party extend to its offline collective action ? Research Questions
  8. 8. 12 parties selected among 2,200 civic advocacy parties Membership ( > 100), Activeness (recent Tweets), Missions statements (political, commercial, social) Method: Cases Political Commercial Social Cho-pae-gong-sa 730 Blackberry Users 824 Fair Tourism 144 Support MBC 119 Info Repository for Android Phone 702 Social Innovation Community 186 Make Common-sense Prevail 299 Official Party of HTC Users 678 Party for Social Welfare 176 Korean HTC Users Party 501 Party for Volunteer Activity 359 Food Car of Love 119
  9. 9. Followers vs. Following Conversation vs. Content Spread Data period: Mar. – Sept. 2010 Result 1: Attributes of party organizers
  10. 10. <ul><li>More conversation and more content-sharing with party members than followers </li></ul><ul><li>70 % of activities allotted to their relation with members </li></ul>*p < 0.1, df = 20 Note: i) ‘Chopae’ is excluded from the analysis as an outlier. ii) Actions of reply, mention, retweet, and attribution are counted based on the number of ‘unique tweets’ generated. For instance, if a tweet denotes three members (or followers), it is regarded as one tweet, instead of three tweets. iii) Followers include both members and non-members. Data period: Mar. – Sept. 2010 Result 2: Activities of party organizers with followers and members Mean t  Member Follower Conversation per 100 Twitterer 216.1 58 1.842* 0.091 Content Spreading Actions per 100 Twitterer 38.0 11.2 2.068* 0.060
  11. 11. Result 2: Activities of party organizers with followers and members NodeXL two-mode network visualization The central nodes(blue triangle) represent party organizers and the different color and shape of the nodes indicates followers of the party organizer (lime square) and members of the party (red circle). The size of the node denotes the number of replies and retweets. Data period: Mar. – Sept. 2010, Party Conversation Content Spreading Chopae MBC Common Sense
  12. 12. Result 2: Activities of party organizers with followers and members Party Conversation Content Spreading Blackberry Android Official HTC
  13. 13. Result 2: Activities of party organizers with followers and members Party Conversation Content Spreading Korean HTC Tourism Innovation
  14. 14. Result 2: Activities of party organizers with followers and members Party Conversation Content Spreading Welfare Volunteer Food Car
  15. 15. <ul><li>Semantic Network Analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Case: Chopae, Blackberry, and Volunteer </li></ul><ul><li>Data gathering period: Nov. 5 to 25, 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>CONCOR conducted during the analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Top 20 words of each party </li></ul>Result 3: Formation of shared values among members
  16. 16. Result 3: Formation of shared values among members Chopae (Political) Blackberry (Commercial) Volunteer (Social) 1,618 tweets 3,690 tweets 893 tweets 7 clusters, 2 large clusters Engaged in criticizing G-20 and conservative newspapers. 7clusters, 2 main clusters Shared product information and tweeted lost-and-found notifications 6 clusters, 2 large clusters Gathering volunteers and notifying schedules of volunteer activities
  17. 17. <ul><li>Hierarchy among members </li></ul><ul><li>9 executives, 41 directors, 3 heads of a labor union </li></ul><ul><li>Forms of online movement </li></ul><ul><li>Retweeting: mode of social actions against vested rights </li></ul><ul><li>G-20 (109 out of 683tweets) </li></ul><ul><li>Conservative dailies and conglomerates (68 out of 683tweets) (at the 1 st week of Nov. 2010) </li></ul><ul><li>Online caricature parody, 140-character novels about the President, Newspaper monitoring </li></ul><ul><li>Forms of offline action </li></ul><ul><li>Gatherings on a monthly basis </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop, lecture, casual party, coalition with other parties </li></ul>Result 4: Extension of online activity to offline collective action (Case study of ‘Chopae’)
  18. 18. <ul><li>Shared action plan </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage ‘retweets’ through the participation of at least 10% of total members Forms of online movement </li></ul><ul><li>Designate a day for ‘Chopae’ to implement a barrage of ‘mentions’ against ‘Chosunilbo’ in Twitter sphere </li></ul><ul><li>Make leaflets, stickers, and cellular phone accessories </li></ul><ul><li>Arrange offline lectures and interviews with public figures </li></ul><ul><li>Open nationwide events to publicize its argument and recruit human resources as a long-term plan </li></ul>Result 4: Extension of online activity to offline collective action
  19. 19. <ul><li>“ Small change: why the revolution will not be tweeted” ?? </li></ul><ul><li>(Gladwell, Oct. 4, 2010) </li></ul><ul><li>Not for true activism (lacking strong ties and a hierarchical org.) </li></ul><ul><li>Party organizers (acquaintances & broadcasters, conversation > content spreading) invest more organizational effort to party members </li></ul><ul><li>Party members form shared values </li></ul><ul><li>Parties extend online movements to offline, daily, collective actions using Twitaddons.com. </li></ul><ul><li>“ Technology-mediated social participation ” with increased usability and sociability of technologies to foster vital communities (Pirolli et al., 2010). </li></ul>Conclusion
  20. 20. THANK YOU !

×