TEDxYork

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My Art/Tech/City talk for TEDxYork.

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  • \n
  • I want to talk to you about the city (in the eyes of the city, we’re just ghosts, the impulses running through its synapses that raise a bridge here, a building there) \n(not slum city, but western developed city)\n
  • little bit from where I’m from\nlincolnshire - second largest, second least populated\nbiggest exports include\n
  • \n
  • why am I interested in the city. As a place of passing, owenership, uprising, a place where the people amass, a place of equal footing\n
  • according to recent data from the world resources institute just over 90% of the UK currently live in urban space\n\nGRAPH\n\nparticularly, in light of the theme of this TEDx event ‘a new STEAM’ age look at how technology is changing our city. And it is\n
  • actually a much better and far more ubiquitous source of surveillance. In the UK there are 3 for every person. They can track our locations to the nearest metre, take still images, videos, record sound, if any of this data is held or transmitted the police have a right to demand it under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act \n
  • The networked city. A nervous system made up of nodes.\n\nprivate - weather towers\npersonal - mobile phones\npublic - gunshot detectors\n\nhow we move and interact in our cities being shaped with digital technology\npersonal technology: headphones, mobile phones\n
  • The networked city. A nervous system made up of nodes.\n\nprivate - weather towers\npersonal - mobile phones\npublic - gunshot detectors\n\nhow we move and interact in our cities being shaped with digital technology\npersonal technology: headphones, mobile phones\n
  • The networked city. A nervous system made up of nodes.\n\nprivate - weather towers\npersonal - mobile phones\npublic - gunshot detectors\n\nhow we move and interact in our cities being shaped with digital technology\npersonal technology: headphones, mobile phones\n
  • It’s also being shaped by private technologies. I think a perfect way to describe advertising is the attempt to change how we move and interact; to infiltrate it with stories of what we could be\ninteractive billboard, Adam Greenfield’s examples - vending machines\n
  • Say what you like about Warren Ellis, but he knows how to tell good stories about the future\n
  • USB dead drops – but in real physical space, the city beauocracy wins out “fly posting is illegal – google map pins are not” – warren ellis talks of overlaying ‘spectral detournement’ – digital sandpaper\n
  • infovore - tower bridge. Explain the instrumented city\n\nprivate interests, walled gardens\n
  • infovore - tower bridge. Explain the instrumented city\n\nprivate interests, walled gardens\n
  • Do we want to live in another world of walled gardens?\n
  • Walk-shops, open data, open data collectors\nAs technology becomes more pervasive and integral\n\nwe find the body (as data source) both the site of our occupation and the site of our insurrection; by making the technology visible, we can regain control. \n\nIn terms of art you can see this in “Boal’s belief in the body as one’s most essential tool in transforming [...] altering everyday space” (Schutzman & Cohen-Cruz, 1994, p. 3), \nThe body is the site where we can re-write the base code of the city’s capitalist programming, and art the tool best placed to do it\na revolutionary practice that relies as much on imagining and mobilizing better stories as on shocks to the system (Pile, 2010, p. 53)\n\n
  • \ngrafitti grows on the walls of the city. It understands the city as a material. Art needs to do this with technology, too \nart and the city. Forget the cultural quarter, a cage for culture, think haunting. Think augmenting reality with art, \ngiving people the tools of agency and imagination\n\n
  • why art? BECAUSE WE need stories to rival the other stories\n
  • There are artists out there, doing it now,\n\n\n
  • Nikki Pugh - the act of walking into art. The idea of the routes we write.\n
  • Duncan Speakman - haunting, people move through a city space unnoticed, but part of another world, where meaning is enhanced, like someone had turned up the contrast\n
  • Slunglow - remaking ‘magic realism’ wove a fabric time, space, people and place\n
  • These examples, they use technology, but not as a tool, They put a body at the centre of it, and use it to create a spectre. \nIf I might return to the metaphor of ‘steam’. Technology and art should about taking heat, and water, and producing something fundamentally different.\nToo often the arts look at technology as a tool – not as a material, as long as they do, they won’t truly be able to work with it\nThe arts need to embed themselves in the real world like a virus. Haunting the city with visions of what it might be. Of how we, not private interests, might be able to use technology in the city.\n\n
  • TEDxYork

    1. 1. @hannahnicklin
    2. 2. The Cityimage shared via cc by marfis75 http://bit.ly/kSOyr4
    3. 3. Image share via CC by quixotic54
    4. 4. Image shared by CC via Brantford Selections
    5. 5. Graph shared via CC by Taylorluker
    6. 6. Image shared via CC by bhikku
    7. 7. Image shared via cc by Hello Turkey Toe
    8. 8. private Image shared via cc by Hello Turkey Toe
    9. 9. privatepersonal Image shared via cc by Hello Turkey Toe
    10. 10. privatepersonal public Image shared via cc by Hello Turkey Toe
    11. 11. Image shared via CC by Soyza
    12. 12. “[We’re] giving the gift of the digital city to our ruling classes” - WarrenEllis.com
    13. 13. Image shared via CC by adactio
    14. 14. Image shared via CC by Fikra
    15. 15. Image shared via CC by Fikra
    16. 16. The frustrations that you see in the real city are coming to the instrumented city, and this highlights an interesting set of problems if you’re designing that instrumented city. http://infovore.org/Image shared via CC by Fikra
    17. 17. Whose Streets?
    18. 18. “We can re-utilise, re-purpose, and re-vivify the spaces of our cities in waysthat are responsive to our own needs.In ways that make us not consumersof the city; but co-constituents of it inreal time” (Greenfield, 2011)
    19. 19. Art by Kid Acne, photo shared via CC by sheila_blige
    20. 20. “We live at a time when people increasinglyexpress the feeling that the world outsideour windows is a dangerous and fragmentedplace. Once upon a time people walkedthrough the city and it gave them a chanceto name places and make contact with eachother. [...] humans need to mark their livesagainst a real space and other people.When they cease to walk, the real spacesbecome less plausible then than thecentralized reality of the media.” - Graeme Miller (Lavery, 2010, p. 153)
    21. 21. This is a call to artists, technologists, and everyone in between.
    22. 22. Photo by and re-produced by kind permission of Nikki
    23. 23. Photo by me
    24. 24. Photos by Simon Warner shared with kind permission of Slunglow
    25. 25. Image shared via CC by writRHET

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