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Low embodied energy

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Types of embodied energy · Initial embodied energy; and · Recurring embodied energy

The initial embodied energy in buildings represents the non-renewable energy consumed in the acquisition of raw materials, their processing, manufacturing, transportation to site, and construction. This initial embodied energy has two components: Direct energy the energy used to transport building products to the site, and then to construct the building; and Indirect energy the energy used to acquire, process, and manufacture the building materials, including any transportation related to these activities.

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Low embodied energy

  1. 1. LOW EMBODIED ENERGY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGIES Presented by Aiman Sarah Nazia Sufyan Hamzah
  2. 2. What is Embodied energy ? The embodied energy (carbon) of a building material can be taken as the total primary energy consumed (carbon released) over its life cycle. This would normally include (at least) extraction, manufacturing and transportation.
  3. 3. Types of embodied energy · Initial embodied energy; and · Recurring embodied energy The initial embodied energy in buildings represents the non-renewable energy consumed in the acquisition of raw materials, their processing, manufacturing, transportation to site, and construction. This initial embodied energy has two components: Direct energy the energy used to transport building products to the site, and then to construct the building; and Indirect energy the energy used to acquire, process, and manufacture the building materials, including any transportation related to these activities.
  4. 4. RECURRING EMBODIED ENERGY The recurring embodied energy in buildings represents the non-renewable energy consumed to maintain, repair, restore, refurbish or replace materials, components or systems during the life of the building.
  5. 5. How is embodied energy measured? Embodied energy is measured as the quantity of non- renewable energy per unit of building material, component or system. It is expressed in megajoules (MJ) or gigajoules (GJ) per unit weight (kg or tonne) or area (m2) but the process of calculating embodied energy is complex and involves numerous sources of data.
  6. 6. UNITS OF MEASUREMENT  Standard Unit for Embodied Energy: MJ/ kg material  Standard Unit for Carbon emissions: Kg CO2/ kg material Functional units: MJ/ m3 material Kg CO2/ m3 material
  7. 7. Energy consumption in buildings occurs in five phases. • The first phase corresponds to the manufacturing of building materials and components, which is termed as embodied energy. • The second and third phases correspond to the energy used to transport materials from production plants to the building site and the energy used in the actual construction of the building, which is respectively referred to as grey energy and induced energy.
  8. 8. • Fourthly, energy is consumed at the operational phase, which corresponds to the running of the building when it is occupied. • Finally, energy is consumed in the demolition process of buildings as well as in the recycling of their parts, when this is promoted.
  9. 9. CRADLE-TO-GATE is an assessment of a partial product life cycle from resource extraction (cradle) to the factory gate - Energy inputs from: • Extraction of raw materials • Transportation to factory • Manufacture of product / components • Assembly of product / system • Transportation to site / point of sale • Installation / construction • Maintenance • Replacement • Disposal / re-purposing / recycling
  10. 10. PROCESS 01
  11. 11. 02
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  13. 13. Certified wood is the only product that can carry the added value of chain-of- custody certification—which confirms that it came from sustainably managed, third-party certified forests. Similar to tracking packages, chain-of-custody tracks forest products through all phases of ownership, processing and transportation, from the forest of origin to the end consumer. The chain-of-custody system is verified through an independent third-party audit. The result is that buyers know their building materials are coming from forests managed in accordance with strict sustainable forest management certification standards—and not from controversial sources such as illegal logging. The concrete and steel industries have no third-party sustainability certification or chain-of-custody certification. However, progress is being made in responsible procurement. In particular, some steel companies are reportedly encouraging suppliers to adopt responsible practices and/or management systems certified to ISO standards. In certain cases, companies dedicate online resources to screening potential suppliers and to promoting and monitoring the performance of existing vendors. Steel is often imported from developing countries and the absence of a third-party certification program makes it impossible to accurately assess the environmental and social impacts of steel products. Photos: naturallywood.com Sources: Photos: naturallywood.com Manufacturing Timber importer Chain of Custody certificate Chain of Custody certificate Chain of Custody certificate Tracking     Certified Forest Forest Management certificate Certified Logs Chain of Custody certificate Manufacturing Chain of Custody certificate Timber importer Chain of Custody certificate Chain of Custody certificate Sawmill Chain of Custody certificate
  14. 14. EMBODIED ENERGY CHAIN
  15. 15. ENERGY USE
  16. 16. ENERGY USE
  17. 17. How much embodied energy is typically found in buildings?
  18. 18. Embodied energy depends on: • efficiency of the individual manufacturing process • the fuels used in the manufacture of the materials • the distances materials are transported • the amount of recycled product used.
  19. 19. When selecting building materials, the embodied energy should be considered with respect to: 1. the durability of building materials 2. how easily materials can be separated 3. use of locally sourced materials 4. use of recycled materials 5. specifying standard sizes of materials 6. avoiding waste 7. selecting materials that are manufactured using renewable energy sources.
  20. 20.  Buildings account for 30 to 40% of total global energy usage. (United Nations Environmental Programme)  The construction sector is responsible for :  40% of the consumed resources  40% of CO2 emissions  40% of waste (construction and demolition) (UNCHS/ Habitat) ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF THE BUILDING INDUSTRY Cities take about 2 % of the land surface but consume 75 % of the world’s natural resources.
  21. 21. Guidelines for reducing embodied energy 1. Design for long life and adaptability, using durable low maintenance materials. 2. Ensure materials can be easily separated. 3. Modify or refurbish instead of demolishing or adding. 4. Ensure construction wastes and materials from demolition of existing buildings are reused or recycled. 5. Use locally sourced materials (including materials salvaged on site) to reduce transport. 6. Select low embodied energy materials (which may include materials with a high recycled content), preferably based on supplier-specific data.
  22. 22. 1. Avoid wasteful material use. For example, specify standard sizes wherever possible (windows, door, panels) to avoid using additional materials as fillers. Some energy intensive finishes, such as paints, often have high wastage levels so try to buy only as much as you need. 2. Ensure offcuts are recycled and use only sufficient structural materials to ensure stability and meet construction standards. 3. Select materials that can be reused or recycled easily at the end of their lives using existing recycling systems. 4. Give preference to materials that have been manufactured using renewable energy sources. 5. Use efficient building envelope design and fittings to minimise materials (e.g. an energy efficient building envelope can downsize or eliminate the need for heaters and coolers, water- efficient taps can allow downsizing of water pipes). Guidelines for reducing embodied energy
  23. 23. REUSE AND RECYCLING Reuse of building materials commonly saves about 95% of embodied energy that would otherwise be wasted. However, some materials such as bricks and roof tiles may be damaged when reused.
  24. 24. Construction technique for low embodied energy
  25. 25. Architect: ANUPAMA KUNDOO
  26. 26. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES CSEB (Compressed Stabilised Earth Block) MASONRY WALLS
  27. 27. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES CONVENTIONAL COUNTRY FIRED BRICK WALLS
  28. 28. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES CONVENTIONAL REINFORCED CONCRETE WALLS
  29. 29. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES CSEB VAULTING
  30. 30. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FERROCEMENT CHANNELS
  31. 31. COMPARISON OF MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES CONVENTIONAL RCC SLAB
  32. 32. EXPLORATION
  33. 33. Thank You FOR MORE MATERIAL : http://media.cannondesign.com/uploads/files/MaterialLife-9-6.pdf FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: Gabrielle Rossit 416.915.0121 (Toronto) grossit@cannondesign.com Marion Lawson 312.960.8382 (Chicago) mlawson@cannondesign.com

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