World Class & Responsibility

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World Class & Responsibility

  1. 1. “In short, I am responsible for the ship throughout itslife - from the very beginning to the very end.” - H.G. Rickover (1900 – 1986) 1
  2. 2. PRESENTATION OVERVIEW NR Organization – DON/NAVSEA – DOE/NNSA History Timeline Ship Life-Cycle – Design – Construction – Operation – Inactivation/Disposal/Recycling References Questions Disclaimer: The information contained within this presentation is based on research by the presenter using information available to the Public. This presentation and the views of the presenter do not necessarily reflect the 2 views of the U.S. Department of Energy or the U.S. Department of the Navy.
  3. 3. Admiral Rickover Father of the Nuclear Navy (Retired January 19, 1982)"My program is unique in the military service in this respect: You know the expression from the womb to the tomb;my organization is responsible for initiating the idea for a project; for doing the research, and the development;designing and building the equipment that goes into the ships; for the operations of the ship; for the selection of theofficers and men who man the ship; for their education and training. In short, I am responsible for the shipthroughout its life — from the very beginning to the very end." (Hearings on Military Posture and H.R. 12564,U.S. G.P.O., 1974, page 1,392) 3
  4. 4. August 2000“There was no precedent for a program of such breadth. It was as if Henry Ford had creatednot only the automobile industry, but also oil refineries, gas stations, highways, motels,roadmaps and the AAA.” - Theodore Rockwell, 1992. 4
  5. 5. (Department of the Navy) 5
  6. 6. 6
  7. 7. History Timeline 1955 – USS Nautilus (SSN-571) went to sea 1970’s – Initial planning for inactivation 1980’s – SSBNs decommissioning (SALT II) 1984 – EIS (Pre-Los Angeles Class Submarines) 1986 – First RC disposal complete 1990 – Submarine recycling authorized 1991 – First submarine recycling complete 1996 – EIS (Cruiser, Ohio & Los Angeles Class) 1997 – First Los Angeles Class RC disposal complete 1999 – First CGN RC disposal and Recycling complete 2007 – 109 Recycled, 115 defueled RC disposals complete, over 750 container shipments of Naval spent fuel. ( As of 2007, Program Operates 103 Reactors ) 7
  8. 8. SHIP LIFE-CYCLE 8
  9. 9. DESIGN 9
  10. 10. DESIGNSource: Norman Polmar & K. J. Moore, “Cold War Submarines,” 2004. 10
  11. 11. DESIGNDiagram of a Typical Naval Nuclear Propulsion Plant 11
  12. 12. CONSTRUCTION ( Newport News & Electric Boat ) Ingalls Shipbuilding - MSNorthrop Grumman Shipbuilding (Newport News) - VA Bethlehem Steel (Quincy) – MA Portsmouth Naval Shipyard - ME 12General Dynamics Electric Boat - CT Mare Island Naval Shipyard - CA New York Shipbuilding - NJ
  13. 13. OPERATION 13
  14. 14. OPERATION 14
  15. 15. Inactivation/Disposal/Recycling Puget Sound Naval Shipyard 15
  16. 16. Inactivation/Disposal/Recycling Puget Sound Naval Shipyard History – 1891 • Bremerton, WA – WWI • Built 36 ships, 6 submarines – WWII • Repair battle-damaged ships – 1965 • Nuclear Repair Facility – 1980’s • RC Disposal • ~6% Workload involves inactivation/recycling – 1987 • Homeport USS Nimitz – 2003 • “PSNS & IMF” • Largest on the West Coast 16
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. PLANNING FOR DISPOSAL ( Began in the late 1970’s ) Organizations Involved – Federal • DOE-RL, EPA, OSHA, USN Region NW, USCG, NCIS, USACE, NUWC – State • Washington State Department of Ecology, Washington State Department of Health (Division of Radiation Protection), Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife • Oregon State Department of Energy, Oregon State Health Division (Radiation Control Section) – Local • Port of Benton, Puget Sound Air Pollution Control Agency – Native American Indian Tribes and Nations • Yakama Indian Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Confederate Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation – Private Industry • American Bureau of Shipping, Columbia River Bar Pilots Association, Towing and Landhaul Contractors, Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Columbia River Pilots Association 18
  19. 19. AWAITING DISPOSAL( Puget Sound Naval Shipyard March 13, 1996 ) 19
  20. 20. REACTOR COMPARTMENT (RC) DISPOSAL PROCESS INACTIVATION DEFUELING CONSTRUCTION TRANSPORTATION BURIAL 20
  21. 21. INACTIVATION Weapons Offloaded – Prior to arrival in the Shipyard Reactor Shut Down Ship Drydocked – Expendable materials removed – Industrial gases (O2 & Freon) offloaded – Piping systems drained – Tanks drained & cleaned – Temporary support systems installed 21
  22. 22. DRYDOCKING 22
  23. 23. DEFUELING Opening Cut in the Hull Refueling Enclosure Installed – controlled work area – filtered ventilation Fuel Removed – shielded transfer container Fuel Moved by Crane to Enclosure Fuel Placed into Shipping Container 23
  24. 24. DEFUELING 24
  25. 25. DEFUELING ( Fuel Shipping Container )M-140 Shipping Container Mounted on Railcar 25
  26. 26. RC PACKAGE CONSTRUCTION RC Removal Preparations – Reactor Vessel Drained – Fluid Support Systems Drained – All Openings into Radioactive Systems Sealed RC Separated from Ship End Bulkheads Installed – Minimum 3/4” steel 26
  27. 27. RC PACKAGE CONSTRUCTION ( Separating the RC ) 27
  28. 28. RC PACKAGE( Submarine ) 28
  29. 29. RC PACKAGE ( Cruiser ) 29
  30. 30. TRANSPORTATION RC Package Loaded on Barge Barge Towed to Port of Benton RC Package Loaded onto Trailer RC Package Transported to Burial Trench 30
  31. 31. TRANSPORTATION( Loading Package on Barge ) 31
  32. 32. TRANSPORTATION( Ready for Shipment ) 32
  33. 33. TRANSPORTATION Tow Route 33
  34. 34. TRANSPORTATION( Entering Columbia River ) 34
  35. 35. TRANSPORTATION( Barge on Columbia River ) 35
  36. 36. TRANSPORTATION( Offloading at the Port of Benton ) 36
  37. 37. TRANSPORTATION ( DOE’s Hanford Site ) 37
  38. 38. TRANSPORTATION( Disposal Trench at Hanford ) 38
  39. 39. TRANSPORTATION( Disposal Trench at Hanford ) 39
  40. 40. TRANSPORTATION( Burial Trench ~2001 ) 40
  41. 41. RECYCLING PROCESS 41
  42. 42. RECYCLING Remaining Sections are Recycled – Hazardous Materials Removed • PCBs - sound dampening material, transformers • Asbestos – pipe lagging, deck tiles • Lead - fixed ballast, batteries • Mercury – instruments and gauges – Hull Sections Cut into Pieces – Segregate and Sell Scrap Metal 42
  43. 43. RECYCLING( PCB Felt Sound Damping Material Removal ) 43
  44. 44. RECYCLING( Asbestos Removal ) 44
  45. 45. RECYCLING( Lead Ballast Removal ) 45
  46. 46. RECYCLING( Cutting a Missile Tube Section ) 46
  47. 47. RECYCLING( Dockside Dismantlement of Hull Sections ) 47
  48. 48. RECYCLING( Partially Recycled Submarine ) 48
  49. 49. RECYCLING( Recyclable Material Ready for Shipment ) 49
  50. 50. Estimated Costs ( 1995 ) Inactivation Scrapping Type Cost Cost CGN $103.9 TBD SSBN $29.6 $9.2 SSN $29.6 $6.9(millions of dollars) 50
  51. 51. RECYCLED MATERIAL Typical Submarine ( pounds) HY 80 steel => 2,500,000  Zinc => 6,500 Lead => 1,800,000  Sheet Metal => 20,000 Steel => 600,000  Galvanized Steel => 8,000 Brass/Bronze => 250,000  Copper => 90,000 Monel => 150,000  Aluminum => 85,000 Stainless Steel => 110,000 51
  52. 52. RECYCLED MATERIAL Typical Cruiser Hull Steel and Furnishings – 11,000,000 pounds Aluminum Superstructure – 1,000,000 pounds 52
  53. 53. AS OF MARCH 2007THE NAVY HAS SUCCESSFULLY Shipped – 115 Defueled RC’s to Hanford Recycled – 109 Nuclear Powered Warships Container Shipments – Over 750 Shipments of Naval spent fuel 53
  54. 54. REFERENCES “U.S. NAVAL NUCLEAR POWERED SHIP INACTIVATION, DISPOSAL, AND RECYCLING” – United States Department of the Navy, April 1999 “THE UNITED STATES NAVAL NUCLEAR PROPULSION PROGRAM” – U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Department of Defense, August 2000, March 2007 “Nuclear Submarine Decommissioning and Related Problems” – Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Nuclear Submarine Decommissioning and Related Problems, June 1995 Internet – Naval Sea Systems Command, www.navsea.navy.mil – Department of Energy, www.energy.gov – Brookings Institution, www.brook.edu/FP/Projects/nucwcost/subs.htm – Wikipedia.org , Electric Boat, and Newport News websites – The American Presidency Project, www.presidency.ucsb.edu/ 54
  55. 55. QUESTIONS 55

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