Www Cisco Com En Us Docs Switches Lan Catalyst3560 Software Release 12

584 views

Published on

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
584
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Www Cisco Com En Us Docs Switches Lan Catalyst3560 Software Release 12

  1. 1. Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features     Catalyst 3560 Switch Software Configuration  Table Of Contents Guide, Rel. 12.2(25)SEC  Download this chapter Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features  Index  Understanding Optional Spanning ­Tree Features  Configuring Optional Spanning­ Preface   Understanding Port Fast Tree Features Understanding BPDU Guard Download the complete book Overview    Understanding BPDU Filtering Catalyst 3560 Switch Using the Command ­Line Interface    Understanding UplinkFast Software Configuration Guide Assigning the Switch IP Address and  Understanding BackboneFast (full book in PDF format) (PDF ­ Default Gateway    Understanding EtherChannel Guard  11 MB) Configuring IE2100 CNS Agents    Understanding Root Guard Administering the Switch   Understanding Loop Guard Configuring SDM Templates    Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features  Configuring Switch­Based Authentication    Default Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration  Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration Guidelines  Configuring IEEE 802.1x Port ­Based  Enabling Port Fast Authentication   Enabling BPDU Guard Configuring Interface Characteristics    Enabling BPDU Filtering Configuring Smartports Macros    Enabling UplinkFast for Use with Redundant Links Configuring VLANs    Enabling BackboneFast Configuring VTP    Enabling EtherChannel Guard Enabling Root Guard Configuring Private VLANs    Enabling Loop Guard Configuring Voice VLAN    Displaying the Spanning­Tree Status  Configuring 802.1Q and Layer 2 Protocol  Tunneling   Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features   Configuring STP    Configuring MSTP    This chapter describes how to configure optional spanning­tree features on the Catalyst 3560 switch. You can  Configuring Optional Spanning ­Tree  configure all of these features when your switch is running the per­VLAN spanning­tree plus (PVST+). You can  Features    configure only the noted features when your switch is running the Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) or the  Configuring Flex Links    rapid per­VLAN spanning­tree plus (rapid­PVST+) protocol.   Configuring DHCP Features and IP Source  For information on configuring the PVST+ and rapid PVST+, see quot;Configuring STP.quot; For information about the  Guard   Multiple Spanning Tree Protocol (MSTP) and how to map multiple VLANs to the same spanning­tree instance,  Configuring Dynamic ARP Inspection    see quot;Configuring MSTP.quot;  Configuring IGMP Snooping and MVR    Configuring Port­Based Traffic Control   Configuring CDP    Note For complete syntax and usage information for the commands used in this chapter, see the command  Configuring UDLD    reference for this release.  Configuring SPAN and RSPAN    Configuring RMON   This chapter consists of these sections:   Configuring System Message Logging   • Understanding Optional Spanning ­Tree Features  Configuring SNMP   • Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features  Configuring Network Security with ACLs    • Displaying the Spanning­Tree Status  Configuring QoS    Configuring EtherChannels    Understanding Optional Spanning­Tree Features    Configuring IP Unicast Routing    These sections contain this conceptual information:  Configuring IPv6 Unicast Routing rn   • Understanding Port Fast  Configuring HSRP rn   Configuring IP Multicast Routing    • Understanding BPDU Guard   Configuring MSDP    • Understanding BPDU Filtering  Configuring Fallback Bridging    • Understanding UplinkFast  Troubleshooting    • Understanding BackboneFast   Supported MIBs   Working with the Cisco IOS File System,  • Understanding EtherChannel Guard  Configuration Files, and Software Images   • Understanding Root Guard   Unsupported Commands in Cisco IOS  • Understanding Loop Guard  Release 12.2(25)SEC   Understanding Port Fast  Port Fast immediately brings an interface configured as an access or trunk port to the forwarding state from a  blocking state, bypassing the listening and learning states. You can use Port Fast on interfaces connected to a  single workstation or server, as shown in Figure 19­1, to allow those devices to immediately connect to the  network, rather than waiting for the spanning tree to converge.   Interfaces connected to a single workstation or server should not receive bridge protocol data units (BPDUs). An  interface with Port Fast enabled goes through the normal cycle of spanning ­tree status changes when the  switch is restarted.  Note Because the purpose of Port Fast is to minimize the time interfaces must wait for spanning ­tree to converge, it  is effective only when used on interfaces connected to end stations. If you enable Port Fast on an interface  connecting to another switch, you risk creating a spanning­tree loop.   You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree portfast interface configuration or the spanning­tree  portfast default global configuration command.  Figure 19­1 Port Fast­Enabled Interfaces  
  2. 2. You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree portfast interface configuration or the spanning­tree  portfast default global configuration command.  Figure 19­1 Port Fast­Enabled Interfaces   Understanding BPDU Guard  The BPDU guard feature can be globally enabled on the switch or can be enabled per interface, but the feature  operates with some differences.   At the global level, you enable BPDU guard on Port Fast­enabled interfaces by using the  spanning­tree portfast  bpduguard default global configuration command. Spanning tree shuts down interfaces that are in a Port Fast­ operational state. In a valid configuration, Port Fast ­enabled interfaces do not receive BPDUs. Receiving a  BPDU on a Port Fast­enabled interface signals an invalid configuration, such as the connection of an  unauthorized device, and the BPDU guard feature puts the interface in the error ­disabled state.   At the interface level, you enable BPDU guard on any interface by using the spanning­tree bpduguard enable  interface configuration command w ithout also enabling the Port Fast feature. When the interface receives a  BPDU, it is put in the error­disabled state.   The BPDU guard feature provides a secure response to invalid configurations because you must manually put  the interface back in service. Use the BPDU guard feature in a service ­provider network to prevent an access  port from participating in the spanning tree.   You can enable the BPDU guard feature for the entire switch or for an interface.  Understanding BPDU Filtering  The BPDU filtering feature can be globally enabled on the switch or can be enabled per interface, but the feature  operates with some differences.   At the global level, you can enable BPDU filtering on Port Fast ­enabled interfaces by using the  spanning­tree  portfast bpdufilter default global configuration command. This command prevents interfaces that are in a Port  Fast­operational state from sending or receiving BPDUs. The interfaces still send a few BPDUs at link ­up  before the switch begins to filter outbound BPDUs. You should globally enable BPDU filtering on a switch so  that hosts connected to these interfaces do not receive BPDUs. If a BPDU is received on a Port Fast­enabled  interface, the interface loses its Port Fast­operational status, and BPDU filtering is disabled.    At the interface level, you can enable BPDU filtering on any interface by using the spanning­tree bpdufilter  enable interface configuration command without also enabling the Port Fast feature. This command prevents  the interface from sending or receiving BPDUs.  Caution  Enabling BPDU filtering on an interface is the same as disabling spanning tree on it and can result in  spanning ­tree loops.   You can enable the BPDU filtering feature for the entire switch or for an interface.   Understanding UplinkFast  Switches in hierarchical networks can be grouped into backbone switches, distribution switches, and access  switches. Figure 19­2 shows a complex network where distribution switches and access switches each have at  least one redundant link that spanning tree blocks to prevent loops.   Figure 19­2 Switches in a Hierarchical Network   If a switch looses connectivity, it begins using the alternate paths as soon as the spanning tree selects a new  root port. By enabling UplinkFast with the spanning­tree uplinkfast global configuration command, you can  accelerate the choice of a new root port when a link or switch fails or when the spanning tree reconfigures itself.  The root port transitions to the forwarding state immediately without going through the listening and learning  states, as it would with the normal spanning ­tree procedures.   When the spanning tree reconfigures the new root port, other interfaces flood the network with multicast  packets, one for each address that was learned on the interface. You can limit these bursts of multicast traffic by  reducing the max­update­rate parameter (the default for this parameter is 150 packets per second). However, if  you enter zero, station­learning frames are not generated, so the spanning­tree topology converges more slowly  after a loss of connectivity.  Note UplinkFast is most useful in wiring ­closet switches at the access or edge of the network. It is not appropriate for  backbone devices. This feature might not be useful for other types of applications. 
  3. 3. When the spanning tree reconfigures the new root port, other interfaces flood the network with multicast  packets, one for each address that was learned on the interface. You can limit these bursts of multicast traffic by  reducing the max­update­rate parameter (the default for this parameter is 150 packets per second). However, if  you enter zero, station­learning frames are not generated, so the spanning­tree topology converges more slowly  after a loss of connectivity.  Note UplinkFast is most useful in wiring ­closet switches at the access or edge of the network. It is not appropriate for  backbone devices. This feature might not be useful for other types of applications.  UplinkFast provides fast convergence after a direct link failure and achieves load balancing between redundant  Layer 2 links using uplink groups. An uplink group is a set of Layer 2 interfaces (per VLAN), only one of which is  forwarding at any given time. Specifically, an uplink group consists of the root port (which is forwarding) and a  set of blocked ports, except for self­looping ports. The uplink group provides an alternate path in case the  currently forwarding link fails.   Figure 19­3 shows an example topology with no link failures. Switch A, the root switch, is connected directly to  Switch B over link L1 and to Switch C over link L2. The Layer 2 interface on Switch C that is connected directly to  Switch B is in a blocking state.  Figure 19­3 UplinkFast Example Before Direct Link Failure   If Switch C detects a link failure on the currently active link L2 on the root port (a direct link failure), UplinkFast  unblocks the blocked interface on Switch C and transitions it to the forwarding state without going through the  listening and learning states, as shown in  Figure 19­4. This change takes approximately 1 to 5 seconds.   Figure 19­4 UplinkFast Example After Direct Link Failure   Understanding BackboneFast  BackboneFast detects indirect failures in the core of the backbone. BackboneFast is a complementary  technology to the UplinkFast feature, which responds to failures on links directly connected to access switches.  BackboneFast optimizes the maximum­age timer, which controls the amount of time the switch stores protocol  information received on an interface. When a switch receives an inferior BPDU from the designated port of  another switch, the BPDU is a signal that the other switch might have lost its path to the root, and BackboneFast  tries to find an alternate path to the root.  BackboneFast, which is enabled by using the spanning­tree backbonefast global configuration command,  starts when a root port or blocked interface on a switch receives inferior BPDUs from its designated switch. An  inferior BPDU identifies a switch that declares itself as both the root bridge and the designated switch. When a  switch receives an inferior BPDU, it means that a link to which the switch is not directly connected (an indirect  link) has failed (that is, the designated switch has lost its connection to the root switch). Under spanning ­tree  rules, the switch ignores inferior BPDUs for the configured maximum aging time specified by the spanning­tree  vlan vlan­id max­age global configuration command.   The switch tries to find if it has an alternate path to the root switch. If the inferior BPDU arrives on a blocked  interface, the root port and other blocked interfaces on the switch become alternate paths to the root switch.  (Self­looped ports are not considered alternate paths to the root switch.) If the inferior BPDU arrives on the root  port, all blocked interfaces become alternate paths to the root switch. If the inferior BPDU arrives on the root port  and there are no blocked interfaces, the switch assumes that it has lost connectivity to the root switch, causes  the maximum aging time on the root port to expire, and becomes the root switch according to normal spanning ­ tree rules.  If the switch has alternate paths to the root switch, it uses these alternate paths to send a root link query (RLQ)  request. The switch sends the RLQ request on all alternate paths and waits for an RLQ reply from other  switches in the network.  If the switch discovers that it still has an alternate path to the root, it expires the maximum aging time on the  interface that received the inferior BPDU. If all the alternate paths to the root switch indicate that the switch has  lost connectivity to the root switch, the switch expires the maximum aging time on the interface that received the  RLQ reply. If one or more alternate paths can still connect to the root switch, the switch makes all interfaces on  which it received an inferior BPDU its designated ports and moves them from the blocking state (if they were in  the blocking state), through the listening and learning states, and into the forwarding state.  Figure 19­5 shows an example topology with no link failures. Switch A, the root switch, connects directly to  Switch B over link L1 and to Switch C over link L2. The Layer 2 interface on Switch C that connects directly to  Switch B is in the blocking state.  Figure 19­5 BackboneFast Example Before Indirect Link Failure  
  4. 4. Switch B over link L1 and to Switch C over link L2. The Layer 2 interface on Switch C that connects directly to  Switch B is in the blocking state.  Figure 19­5 BackboneFast Example Before Indirect Link Failure   If link L1 fails as shown in Figure 19­6, Switch C cannot detect this failure because it is not connected directly to  link L1. However, because Switch B is directly connected to the root switch over L1, it detects the failure, elects  itself the root, and begins sending BPDUs to Switch C, identifying itself as the root. When Switch C receives the  inferior BPDUs from Switch B, Switch C assumes that an indirect failure has occurred. At that point,  BackboneFast allows the blocked interface on Switch C to move immediately to the listening state without  waiting for the maximum aging time for the interface to expire. BackboneFast then transitions the Layer 2  interface on Switch C to the forwarding state, providing a path from Switch B to Switch A. The root­switch election  takes approximately 30 seconds, twice the Forward Delay time if the default Forward Delay time of 15 seconds  is set. Figure 19­6 shows how BackboneFast reconfigures the topology to account for the failure of link L1.   Figure 19­6 BackboneFast Example After Indirect Link Failure   If a new switch is introduced into a shared­medium topology as shown in  Figure 19­7, BackboneFast is not  activated because the inferior BPDUs did not come from the recognized designated switch (Switch B). The new  switch begins sending inferior BPDUs that indicate it is the root switch. However, the other switches ignore  these inferior BPDUs, and the new switch learns that Switch B is the designated switch to Switch A, the root  switch.  Figure 19­7 Adding a Switch in a Shared­Medium Topology   Understanding EtherChannel Guard  You can use EtherChannel guard to detect an EtherChannel misconfiguration between the switch and a  connected device. A misconfiguration can occur if the switch interfaces are configured in an EtherChannel, but  the interfaces on the other device are not. A misconfiguration can also occur if the channel parameters are not  the same at both ends of the EtherChannel. For EtherChannel configuration guidelines, see the  quot;EtherChannel Configuration Guidelinesquot; section .  If the switch detects a misconfiguration on the other device, EtherChannel guard places the switch interfaces in  the error­disabled state, and displays an error message.   You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree etherchannel guard misconfig global configuration  command.   Understanding Root Guard  The Layer 2 network of a service provider (SP) can include many connections to switches that are not owned by  the SP. In such a topology, the spanning tree can reconfigure itself and select a customer switch as the root  switch, as shown in Figure 19­8. You can avoid this situation by enabling root guard on SP switch interfaces that  connect to switches in your customer's network. If spanning­tree calculations cause an interface in the  customer network to be selected as the root port, root guard then places the interface in the root­inconsistent  (blocked) state to prevent the customer's switch from becoming the root switch or being in the path to the root.  If a switch outside the SP network becomes the root switch, the interface is blocked (root ­inconsistent state),  and spanning tree selects a new root switch. The customer's switch does not become the root switch and is not  in the path to the root.  If the switch is operating in multiple spanning ­tree (MST) mode, root guard forces the interface to be a  designated port. If a boundary port is blocked in an internal spanning­tree (IST) instance because of root guard,  the interface also is blocked in all MST instances. A boundary port is an interface that connects to a LAN, the  designated switch of which is either an IEEE 802.1D switch or a switch with a different MST region  configuration.  Root guard enabled on an interface applies to all the VLANs to which the interface belongs. VLANs can be  grouped and mapped to an MST instance.  You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree guard root interface configuration command.   Caution  Misuse of the root­guard feature can cause a loss of connectivity.  
  5. 5. the interface also is blocked in all MST instances. A boundary port is an interface that connects to a LAN, the  designated switch of which is either an IEEE 802.1D switch or a switch with a different MST region  configuration.  Root guard enabled on an interface applies to all the VLANs to which the interface belongs. VLANs can be  grouped and mapped to an MST instance.  You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree guard root interface configuration command.   Caution  Misuse of the root­guard feature can cause a loss of connectivity.   Figure 19­8 Root Guard in a Service­Provider Network   Understanding Loop Guard  You can use loop guard to prevent alternate or root ports from becoming designated ports because of a failure  that leads to a unidirectional link. This feature is most effective when it is enabled on the entire switched  network. Loop guard prevents alternate and root ports from becoming designated ports, and spanning tree  does not send BPDUs on root or alternate ports.  You can enable this feature by using the spanning­tree loopguard default global configuration command.   When the switch is operating in PVST+ or rapid ­PVST+ mode, loop guard prevents alternate and root ports from  becoming designated ports, and spanning tree does not send BPDUs on root or alternate ports.   When the switch is operating in MST mode, BPDUs are not sent on nonboundary ports only if the interface is  blocked by loop guard in all MST instances. On a boundary port, loop guard blocks the interface in all MST  instances.   Configuring Optional Spanning­Tree Features    These sections contain this configuration information:   • Default Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration  • Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration Guidelines  • Enabling Port Fast (optional)  • Enabling BPDU Guard (optional)  • Enabling BPDU Filtering (optional)  • Enabling UplinkFast for Use with Redundant Links  (optional)  • Enabling BackboneFast (optional)  • Enabling EtherChannel Guard (optional)  • Enabling Root Guard (optional)  • Enabling Loop Guard (optional)  Default Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration   Table 19­1 shows the default optional spanning ­tree configuration.   Table 19­1 Default Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration    Feature  Default Setting  Port Fast, BPDU filtering,  Globally disabled (unless they are individually  BPDU guard  configured per interface).  UplinkFast  Globally disabled.  BackboneFast  Globally disabled.  EtherChannel guard  Globally enabled.  Root guard  Disabled on all interfaces.   Loop guard  Disabled on all interfaces.   Optional Spanning­Tree Configuration Guidelines   You can configure PortFast, BPDU guard, BPDU filtering, EtherChannel guard, root guard, or loop guard if your  switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.  You can configure the UplinkFast or the BackboneFast feature for rapid PVST+ or for the MSTP, but the feature  remains disabled (inactive) until you change the spanning­tree mode to PVST+.   Enabling Port Fast  An interface with the Port Fast feature enabled is moved directly to the spanning­tree forwarding state without  waiting for the standard forward ­time delay.   Caution  Use Port Fast only when connecting a single end station to an access or trunk port. Enabling this  feature on an interface connected to a switch or hub could prevent spanning tree from detecting and  disabling loops in your network, which could cause broadcast storms and address ­learning 
  6. 6. Enabling Port Fast  An interface with the Port Fast feature enabled is moved directly to the spanning­tree forwarding state without  waiting for the standard forward ­time delay.   Caution  Use Port Fast only when connecting a single end station to an access or trunk port. Enabling this  feature on an interface connected to a switch or hub could prevent spanning tree from detecting and  disabling loops in your network, which could cause broadcast storms and address ­learning  problems.   If you enable the voice VLAN feature, the Port Fast feature is automatically enabled. When you disable voice  VLAN, the Port Fast feature is not automatically disabled. For more information, see  quot;Configuring Voice VLAN.quot;  You can enable this feature if your switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.   Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable Port Fast. This procedure is optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   interface interface­id  Specify an interface to configure, and enter interface  configuration mode.  Step 3   spanning­tree  Enable Port Fast on an access port connected to a  portfast [trunk]  single workstation or server. By specifying the trunk  keyword, you can enable Port Fast on a trunk port.  Note To enable Port Fast on trunk ports, you must use  the spanning­tree portfast trunk interface  configuration command. The spanning­tree  portfast command will not work on trunk ports.  Caution  Make sure that there are no loops in the  network between the trunk port and the  workstation or server before you enable Port  Fast on a trunk port.  By default, Port Fast is disabled on all interfaces.  Step 4   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 5   show spanning­tree  Verify your entries.  interface interface­id  portfast  Step 6   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.  startup­config   Note You can use the spanning­tree portfast default global configuration command to globally enable the Port Fast  feature on all nontrunking ports.  To disable the Port Fast feature, use the spanning­tree portfast disable interface configuration command.   Enabling BPDU Guard  When you globally enable BPDU guard on interfaces that are Port Fast ­enabled (the interfaces are in a Port  Fast­operational state), spanning tree shuts down Port Fast­enabled interfaces that receive BPDUs.   In a valid configuration, Port Fast­enabled interfaces do not receive BPDUs. Receiving a BPDU on a Port Fast ­ enabled interface signals an invalid configuration, such as the connection of an unauthorized device, and the  BPDU guard feature puts the interface in the error­disabled state. The BPDU guard feature provides a secure  response to invalid configurations because you must manually put the interface back in service. Use the BPDU  guard feature in a service­provider network to prevent an access port from participating in the spanning tree.   Caution  Configure Port Fast only on interfaces that connect to end stations; otherwise, an accidental topology  loop could cause a data packet loop and disrupt switch and network operation.   You also can use the spanning­tree bpduguard enable interface configuration command to enable BPDU  guard on any interface without also enabling the Port Fast feature. When the interface receives a BPDU, it is put  in the error­disabled state.   You can enable the BPDU guard feature if your switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.  Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to globally enable the BPDU guard feature. This  procedure is optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   spanning­tree portfast  Globally enable BPDU guard.  bpduguard default  By default, BPDU guard is disabled.  Step 3   interface interface­id   Specify the interface connected to an end station,  and enter interface configuration mode.  Step 4   spanning­tree portfast   Enable the Port Fast feature.  Step 5   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 6   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 7   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  To disable BPDU guard, use the no spanning­tree portfast bpduguard default global configuration command.   You can override the setting of the no spanning­tree portfast bpduguard default global configuration command  by using the spanning­tree bpduguard enable interface configuration command.  
  7. 7. Step 6   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 7   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  To disable BPDU guard, use the no spanning­tree portfast bpduguard default global configuration command.   You can override the setting of the no spanning­tree portfast bpduguard default global configuration command  by using the spanning­tree bpduguard enable interface configuration command.   Enabling BPDU Filtering  When you globally enable BPDU filtering on Port Fast­enabled interfaces, it prevents interfaces that are in a Port  Fast­operational state from sending or receiving BPDUs. The interfaces still send a few BPDUs at link ­up  before the switch begins to filter outbound BPDUs. You should globally enable BPDU filtering on a switch so  that hosts connected to these interfaces do not receive BPDUs. If a BPDU is received on a Port Fast­enabled  interface, the interface loses its Port Fast­operational status, and BPDU filtering is disabled.    Caution  Configure Port Fast only on interfaces that connect to end stations; otherwise, an accidental topology  loop could cause a data packet loop and disrupt switch and network operation.   You can also use the spanning­tree bpdufilter enable interface configuration command to enable BPDU  filtering on any interface without also enabling the Port Fast feature. This command prevents the interface from  sending or receiving BPDUs.  Caution  Enabling BPDU filtering on an interface is the same as disabling spanning tree on it and can result in  spanning ­tree loops.   You can enable the BPDU filtering feature if your switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.  Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to globally enable the BPDU filtering feature. This  procedure is optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   spanning­tree portfast  Globally enable BPDU filtering.  bpdufilter default  By default, BPDU filtering is disabled.  Step 3   interface interface­id   Specify the interface connected to an end station,  and enter interface configuration mode.  Step 4   spanning­tree portfast   Enable the Port Fast feature.  Step 5   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 6   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 7   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  To disable BPDU filtering, use the no spanning­tree portfast bpdufilter default global configuration command.   You can override the setting of the no spanning­tree portfast bpdufilter default global configuration command  by using the spanning­tree bpdufilter enable interface configuration command.   Enabling UplinkFast for Use with Redundant Links  UplinkFast cannot be enabled on VLANs that have been configured with a switch priority. To enable UplinkFast  on a VLAN with switch priority configured, first restore the switch priority on the VLAN to the default value by  using the no spanning­tree vlan vlan­id priority global configuration command.   Note When you enable UplinkFast, it affects all VLANs on the switch. You cannot configure UplinkFast on an  individual VLAN.  You can configure the UplinkFast feature for rapid PVST+ or for the MSTP, but the feature remains disabled  (inactive) until you change the spanning­tree mode to PVST+.   Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable UplinkFast. This procedure is optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   spanning­tree uplinkfast  Enable UplinkFast.  [max­update­rate pkts­ (Optional) For pkts­per­second, the range is 0 to  per­second]   32000 packets per second; the default is 150.   If you set the rate to 0, station­learning frames are  not generated, and the spanning­tree topology  converges more slowly after a loss of connectivity.  Step 3   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 4   show spanning­tree  Verify your entries.  summary  Step 5   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  When UplinkFast is enabled, the switch priority of all VLANs is set to 49152. If you change the path cost to a  value less than 3000 and you enable UplinkFast or UplinkFast is already enabled, the path cost of all interfaces  and VLAN trunks is increased by 3000 (if you change the path cost to 3000 or above, the path cost is not  altered). The changes to the switch priority and the path cost reduce the chance that a switch will become the  root switch.  When UplinkFast is disabled, the switch priorities of all VLANs and path costs of all interfaces are set to default  values if you did not modify them from their defaults.  To return the update packet rate to the default setting, use the no spanning­tree uplinkfast max­update­rate  global configuration command. To disable UplinkFast, use the no spanning­tree uplinkfast command.   Enabling BackboneFast 
  8. 8. altered). The changes to the switch priority and the path cost reduce the chance that a switch will become the  root switch.  When UplinkFast is disabled, the switch priorities of all VLANs and path costs of all interfaces are set to default  values if you did not modify them from their defaults.  To return the update packet rate to the default setting, use the no spanning­tree uplinkfast max­update­rate  global configuration command. To disable UplinkFast, use the no spanning­tree uplinkfast command.   Enabling BackboneFast  You can enable BackboneFast to detect indirect link failures and to start the spanning ­tree reconfiguration  sooner.  Note If you use BackboneFast, you must enable it on all switches in the network. BackboneFast is not supported on  Token Ring VLANs. This feature is supported for use with third­party switches.   You can configure the BackboneFast feature for rapid PVST+ or for the MSTP, but the feature remains disabled  (inactive) until you change the spanning­tree mode to PVST+.   Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable BackboneFast. This procedure is optional.     Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   spanning­tree backbonefast   Enable BackboneFast.  Step 3   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 4   show spanning­tree summary   Verify your entries.  Step 5   copy running­config startup­ (Optional) Save your entries in the  config  configuration file.  To disable the BackboneFast feature, use the  no spanning­tree backbonefast global configuration command.   Enabling EtherChannel Guard  You can enable EtherChannel guard to detect an EtherChannel misconfiguration if your switch is running  PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.  Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable EtherChannel guard. This procedure is  optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   spanning­tree etherchannel guard  Enable EtherChannel guard.  misconfig  Step 3   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 4   show spanning­tree summary   Verify your entries.  Step 5   copy running­config startup­config   (Optional) Save your entries in the  configuration file.  To disable the EtherChannel guard feature, use the no spanning­tree etherchannel guard misconfig global  configuration command.   You can use the show interfaces status err­disabled privileged EXEC command to show which switch ports  are disabled because of an EtherChannel misconfiguration. On the remote device, you can enter the show  etherchannel summary privileged EXEC command to verify the EtherChannel configuration.  After the configuration is corrected, enter the shutdown and no shutdown interface configuration commands on  the port­channel interfaces that were misconfigured.   Enabling Root Guard  Root guard enabled on an interface applies to all the VLANs to which the interface belongs. Do not enable the  root guard on interfaces to be used by the UplinkFast feature. With UplinkFast, the backup interfaces (in the  blocked state) replace the root port in the case of a failure. However, if root guard is also enabled, all the backup  interfaces used by the UplinkFast feature are placed in the root ­inconsistent state (blocked) and are prevented  from reaching the forwarding state.  Note You cannot enable both root guard and loop guard at the same time.  You can enable this feature if your switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.   Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable root guard on an interface. This procedure is  optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 2   interface interface­id   Specify an interface to configure, and enter  interface configuration mode.  Step 3   spanning­tree guard root   Enable root guard on the interface.  By default, root guard is disabled on all  interfaces.  Step 4   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 5   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 6   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  To disable root guard, use the  no spanning­tree guard interface configuration command.   Enabling Loop Guard  You can use loop guard to prevent alternate or root ports from becoming designated ports because of a failure 
  9. 9. Step 5   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 6   copy running­config  (Optional) Save your entries in the configuration  startup­config   file.  To disable root guard, use the  no spanning­tree guard interface configuration command.   Enabling Loop Guard  You can use loop guard to prevent alternate or root ports from becoming designated ports because of a failure  that leads to a unidirectional link. This feature is most effective when it is configured on the entire switched  network. Loop guard operates only on interfaces that are considered point ­to­point by the spanning tree.   Note You cannot enable both loop guard and root guard at the same time.  You can enable this feature if your switch is running PVST+, rapid PVST+, or MSTP.   Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to enable loop guard. This procedure is optional.    Command  Purpose  Step 1   show spanning­tree active   Verify which interfaces are alternate or root  ports.  or  show spanning­tree mst   Step 2   configure terminal  Enter global configuration mode.  Step 3   spanning­tree loopguard  Enable loop guard.  default  By default, loop guard is disabled.  Step 4   end  Return to privileged EXEC mode.  Step 5   show running­config   Verify your entries.  Step 6   copy running­config startup­ (Optional) Save your entries in the  config  configuration file.  To globally disable loop guard, use the no spanning­tree loopguard default global configuration command.  You can override the setting of the no spanning­tree loopguard default global configuration command by using  the spanning­tree guard loop interface configuration command.   Displaying the Spanning­Tree Status   To display the spanning ­tree status, use one or more of the privileged EXEC commands in Table 19­2:   Table 19­2 Commands for Displaying the Spanning­Tree Status    Command  Purpose  show spanning­tree active   Displays spanning ­tree information on active interfaces  only.  show spanning­tree detail   Displays a detailed summary of interface information.   show spanning­tree  Displays spanning ­tree information for the specified  interface interface­id   interface.  show spanning­tree mst  Displays MST information for the specified interface.  interface interface­id   show spanning­tree  Displays a summary of interface states or displays the  summary [totals]  total lines of the spanning­tree state section.   You can clear spanning­tree counters by using the clear spanning­tree  [interface interface­id] privileged EXEC  command.   For information about other keywords for the show spanning­tree  privileged EXEC command, see the  command reference for this release.   © 1992 ­2009  Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. Terms & Conditions  | Privacy Statement  | Cookie Policy  | Trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc.  

×