Bacterial skin infection

4,798 views

Published on

0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,798
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
14
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
169
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Bacterial skin infection

  1. 1. Prof.Dr.Nabil Kamel
  2. 2. Defense Against bacteria 1‐Dry surface. 2‐ Intact surface. 3‐ Desquamating surface. 4‐ Sebum with its unsaturated fatty acids. 5‐ Normal Flora.
  3. 3. ImpetigoDefinition:Impetigo is a contagious superficial pyogenic infection of the skin.Two main clinical forms are recognized: bullous impetigoNon bullous impetigo or (impetigo contagiosa of Tilbury fox) 
  4. 4. may be caused by stapylococcusaureus, by streptococci or by both organisms together.non bullousimpetigostaphylococcal disease bullousimpetigo
  5. 5. In bullous impetigoThe epidermis splits justbelow the stratumcorneum or granulosumforming large blisters.Neutrophils migratethrough the spongioticepidermis into the blistercavity which may alsocontain cocci.The upper dermis containsan inflammatory infiltrateof neutrophils andlymphocytes.Non bullous impetigoSimilar to bullousExcept that blisterformation is slight andtransient.
  6. 6. ImpetigoThe face especially around the nose and mouth and the limbs are the sites most commonly affected, but involvement of the scalp and the body especially in children with atopic dermatitis or scabies.
  7. 7. ImpetigoClinical features:In bullous impetigo, the bullae are less rapidly ruptured and become much larger. the contents are at first clear later cloudy.after rupture thin flat brownish crusts are formed, central healing and peripheral extension may give rise to circinate lesions. the lesions may occur anywhere.   regional adenitis is rare.
  8. 8. ImpetigoIn non‐bullous impetigo, the initial lesion is very thin‐walled vesicle on an erythematous base, the vesicle ruptures so rapidly that it is seldom seen as such.The exuding serum dries to form yellowish brown crusts. The crusts eventually dry and separate to leave erythema which fades without scarring. In severe cases there may be regional adenitis with fever and other constitutional symptoms.
  9. 9. ImpetigoComplications:Cellulitis.post streptococcal acute glomerulonephritis.the latent period for development of nephritis after streptococcal infection is 18‐21 days, raising the possibility that early treatment of skin infection might offer a better chance of preventing the renal disease.scarlet fever . urticaria and erythema mulitiforme may follow streptococcal impetigo.
  10. 10. ImpetigoRemoval of infected crusts with washing with soap and water or potassium permanganate compresses 1/8000 concentration help also in the treatment.proper hygienic measure and eradication of predisposing factors such as insect bites, pediculosis, scabies and minor tauma reduce the transmission of infection.
  11. 11. Clinical Types of Impetigo Bullous. Circinate. Nonbullous, crusted, Telbery Fox. Secondary. Ecthyma. Follicular, ostial, Bock hart. 
  12. 12. ImpetigoTreatment:In mild and localized infection a local antibiotic as mupirocin oint may be enough.In both Staph and Strept infection. fusidic acid is also effective against both organisms but in order to reduce the likelihood of the development of resistance because of its value in systemic infection it may be better to restrict its use.Topical neomycin and bacitracin are often used in combination.If the infection is widespread or severe or is accompanied by lymphadenopathy or suspect a nephritogenic streptococcus an oral antibiotic such as flucloxacillin or erythromycin is indicated.
  13. 13. ImpetigoRemoval of infected crusts with washing with soap and water or potassium permanganate compresses 1/8000 concentration help also in the treatment.proper hygienic measure and eradication of predisposing factors such as insect bites, pediculosis, scabies and minor tauma reduce the transmission of infection.
  14. 14. ECTHYMA
  15. 15. EcthymaDefinition:is a pyogenic infection of the skin characterized by the formation of adherent crusts ,beneath which ulceration occurs.
  16. 16. EcthymaIt was formerly regarded as a streptococcal.however other cases caused by strept and staph and others caused by staph.the disease may affect children and adults.poor hygiene and malnutrition are predisposing factors and minor injuries or scabies may determine the site of the lesions.
  17. 17. EcthymaClinical features:Small bullae or pustules on an erythematous base are soon covered by hard crusts of dried exudates.the base may become indurated  and a red oedematous areola is often present.The crust is removed with difficulty to reveal a purulent irregular ulcer.Healing  occurs after a few weeks with scarring.Autoinoculation may lead to multiple lesions.the  buttock ,thighs and legs are most commonly affected.
  18. 18. EcthymaTreatment: Improved hygiene and nutrition and treatment of scabies and any other underlying disease are important.the antibiotic chosen should be active against both strept and staph.
  19. 19. CELLULITIS ANDERYSIPELAS
  20. 20. Cellulitis and erysipelasDefinition:Cellulitis is strictly an acute, subacute or chronic inflammation of loose connective tissue of the subcutaneous tissue in which an infective generally bacterial cause is responsible.Erysipelas is a bacterial infection of the dermis and upper subcutaneous tissue, its main feature is a well‐defined raised edge reflecting the more superficial (dermal) involvement.however cellulitis may extend superficially and deeply so that in many cases the two processes coexist and it is impossible to make a distinction.
  21. 21. Cellulitis and erysipelasBacterially:Cellulitis and erysipelas are predominantly streptococcal diseases. in cellulitis, staph is occasionally implicated alone or together with strept. hamophilus influenza is an important cause of facial cellulitis in young children.
  22. 22. Cellulitis and erysipelasClinical features:Erythema,heat ,swelling and pain or tenderness are constant features.In erysipelas the edge of the lesion is well demarcated and raised but in cellulitis it is diffuse.in erysipelas blistering is common and there may be superficial hemorrhage into he blisters or in intact skin especially in elderly people. severe cellulitis may show bullae and can progress to dermal necrosis.lymphangitis and Lymphadenopathy are frequent.except in mild cases there is constitutional upset with fever and malaise.
  23. 23. Classical erysipelas starts suddenly and systemic symptoms may be acute and severe .the leg is the commonest site and here there is usually a wound even if superficial ,an ulcer or an inflammatory lesion including interdigital fungal are possible portal of entry.the next most frequent site for classical streptococcal erysipelas is the face where a traumatic entry site is less commonly seen.Cellulitis and erysipelas
  24. 24. Without effective treatment,complications are common: fasciitis ,myositis,subcutaneous abscesses,septiceamias and in some streptococcal cases nephritis and the more severe infection may be fatal in infants and in the debilitated or immunosuppressed.periorbital and orbital cellulitis may be complicated by cavernous sinus thrombosis.Cellulitis and erysipelas
  25. 25. CellulitisErysipelasStrep or haemophelousinfluenza StreptOrganismMay be present or not Always present General manifestations Ill defined border erythema, edema, hotness, pain, tenderness. Surface may show necrosis. Well defined raised border erythema, edema with hotness, redness, pain and tenderness. Surface may show bullaeLocal ManifestationsCommon on extremities Common on the faceSiteBoth types may end with lymphoedema  and vicous circle i.e. edoema ppt. for cellulites 
  26. 26. Cellulitis and erysipelasTreatment: Penicillin is the treatment of choice and should be continued for 10 days.in recurrent cases long acting penicillin can prevent attacks. in patients allergic to penicillin another drug commonly erythromycin should be taken.some patients may require life long prophylaxis.
  27. 27. INFLAMMATORY DISEASESOF HAIR FOLLICLES
  28. 28. Inflammatory diseases of hair folliclesStaphylococcal infection is a common cause of superficial folliculitis.follicular impetigo of Bockhart is an infection of the follicular osteum with staph aureus. it is commonest in childhood and occur mainly in the scalp or scalp margins or on the limbs.the individual lesion is a yellow pustule sometimes with a narrow red areola. the pustules develop in groups and may heal within 7‐10 days,  but sometimes become chronic.
  29. 29. Inflammatory diseases of hair folliclesTreatment:Mild staphylococcal folliculitis is often self limiting.in more severe cases antibiotics topical or systemic may be required.if the infection is persistent or recuurent,the usual sites of staphylococcal carriage (nose and perineum)should be thought of in the patient and his or her contacts.
  30. 30. FURUNCLE(BOIL)
  31. 31. Furuncle(Boil)Definition:A furuncle is an acute, usually necrotic infection of a hair follicle with staph aureus.
  32. 32. Furuncle(Boil)Etiology:Common in adolescence and early adult life the infection strain of staphylococcus is usually also present in the nares or the perineum.from the sites of carriage the infection is disseminated by the fingers and by clothing. mechanical damage to the skin even the friction of collars and belts may determine the distribution of the lesions.malnutrition is an important predisposing factor in some countries. however in a high proportion of cases no convincing predisposing factor can be responsible.
  33. 33. Pathology:A furuncle is an abscess of a hair follicle, usually of vellus type, the perifollicular abscess is followed by necrosis with destruction of the follicle.Furuncle(Boil)
  34. 34. Clinical features: A furuncle first presents as a small follicular inflammatory nodule soon becoming pustular and then necrotic and healing after discharge of a necrotic core to leave a violaceous macule and a scar.on the upper lip and cheek cavernous sinus thrombosis is a rare and dangerous complication.Furuncle(Boil)
  35. 35. The sites commonly involved are the face and neck,the arms,the fingers,the buttocks and anogenital region.attacks may consist of a single crop or multiple crops at irregular intervals which continue for many months or even years.Furuncle(Boil)
  36. 36. Treatment:Flucloxacillin systemically or another penicillinase resistant antibiotic.a topical antibacterial agent reduces contamination of the surrounding skin.occlusive dressings should be avoided.in recurrent cases exclude diabetes. nasal and perineal carriage should be sought in the patient and other household members.Furuncle(Boil)
  37. 37. CARBUNCLE
  38. 38. CarbuncleEtiology:A carbuncle is a deep infection of a group of contiguous follicles with staph.aureus accompanied by intense inflammatory changes in the surrounding and underlying connective tissues.they may be seen in the apparently healthy but are more common in the presence of diabetes ,malnutrition, cardiac failure and during prolonged steroid therapy.
  39. 39. Clinical features:Painful, hard red swelling. it increases in size for a few days to reach a diameter of 3‐10 cm or more. suppuration beginning after 5‐7 days and pus is discharged from the multiple follicular orifices. necrosis of the intervening skin usually occurs.Carbuncle
  40. 40. Most lesions are on the back of the neck,the shoulders or the hips and thighs.constitutional symptoms may accompany or precede the development of the carbuncle in the form of: Fever , malaise and prostration which may be severe if the carbuncle is large or the patient’s general condition is poor.in favourable cases healing slowly takes place to leave a scar.in bad general condition, death may occur from toxaemia.Carbuncle
  41. 41. Treatment:Flucloxacillin or another penicillinase resistant antibiotic should be given.Diabetes or other possible underlying conditions should be thought of.Carbuncle
  42. 42. SYCOSIS
  43. 43. SycosisDefinition:Sycosis is a subacute or chronic pyogenic infection involving the whole depth of the follicle.
  44. 44. Etiology:Sycosis occurs only in males after puberty and commonly involves the follicles of the beard.the infecting organism is staphylococcal aureus.Sycosis
  45. 45. Clinical features:It is an oedematous red follicular papule or pustule around the hair.The lesions are either discrete or grouped on erythematous oedematous base,especially on the upper lips and below the angles of the jaw.remission and relapses are common for months or years.Sycosis
  46. 46. Treatment:Local antibiotics and in the nasal vestibule also.in chronic cases systemic antibiotics for 10‐14 days.Sycosis
  47. 47. ERYTHRASMA
  48. 48. ErythrasmaDefinition:is a mild,localized superficial infection of the skin caused by corynebacterium Minutissimum.:EtiologyClinical infection may occur at any age but is more common among adults than children,diabetes may be a predisposing factor.,obesity and warm humid climate are predisposing factors also.
  49. 49. Clinical features:It occurs most commonly in the groins,axillae and the intergluteal and submammary flexures,in the groins,it affects the area in contact with the scrotum.the patches are of irregular shape and sharply marginated,at first red but later becoming brown, new lesions are smooth but older lesions tend to be finely wrinkled or scaly.
  50. 50. D.D. of erythrasma :Intertrigo: Frictional dematitis. Tinea cruris. Flexural psoriasis. Seborrhoeic dermatitis 
  51. 51. Fluorescence under wood’s light:Coral red fluorescence with wood’s light strongly suggest erythrasma.Treatment:Erythrasma responds well to most topically applied azole antifungal agents such as clotrimazole and miconazole(although it is a bacterial infection) for two weeks. For more extensive lesions erythromycin is probably the most effective approach, alternatives include topical fucidin and oral tetracycline.

×