“…companies like Best Buy and others spend millions of dollars on education …”Robert Stephens, CTO of Best Buy & Founder o...
Importance of third grade<br />and primary years<br /><ul><li>Nationally, nearly 7 out of 10 third graders are not profici...
California forecasts prison capacity on the basis of Reading proficiency scores in third grade
Gamification professionals can help</li></ul>Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
National Award Winning Video of my Classroom about students’ civic action<br />2009-10, first year of gamification, genera...
Are students performing better in Math?<br />2008-09, Pre-gamification year, my students<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.co...
2009-10, Math<br />1st year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.co...
2010-11, Math<br />2nd year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />
Are students performing better in Reading?<br />2008-09, Pre-gamification year, my class<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.co...
 2009-10, Reading 1st year ofGamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twi...
2010-11, Reading<br />2nd year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms<br />
Who can’t be advanced to proficiency by gamification?<br /><ul><li>Absentees, although students hate to be absent
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Ananth Pai - "Gamifying the Classroom: An Inspirational Teacher’s Story of Making Education Fun"

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As former globetrotting business executive turned elementary school teacher, Ananth Pai has seen it all. But when he inherited his class in White Bear Lake, MN, Pai realized there had to be a better, more engaging way to teach. So he grouped students by learning style, and retooled the curriculum to make use of off-the-shelf games (both edutainment and entertainment) to teach reading, math and other subjects. Students play on Nintendo DS and PCs, both single and multiplayer, for example. Their overall point scores are tabulated and shared using leaderboards. Find out what lessons were uncovered in the classroom.

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  • Good morning.Gabe, thank you for inviting me here.You should know, he really did not have much choice, because not too many classrooms operate using games.Speaking of Dopamine, Gabe said yesterday, the reason we are all here is because we are interested in drugs! If so, I am here to ask you all to join me in becoming “drug pushers” in our schools.
  • As you can see, we need it!The results are alarming. Data like this about our children should make us cry and make us want to act. I believe all of you who are here, as gamification professionals can be instrumental in changing the school experience for kids.
  • I did not use games because I had a grand design. Nor was I a gamer. In my quest online to see what I could do to make the classroom more engaging, I started to read about the work being done at MIT and a British organization. I sought funding from a tech grant program at the District and was promptly declined. So in the 08-09 year, my wife and I donated the funds, got matching dollars from her company and by 09-10 year I had a gamified classroom from the start. That was my third year in teaching.By mid-year, there was a student written petition and a few months later visitors and news crew in the classroom. Here is that story ….
  • So, does the data at the time and since the video two years ago, justify the positive story? This data is from a test used nation wide called NWEA MAP. Students take these in the Fall, Winter and Spring. Please forgive me if some of the rest of this sounds like an earnings conference call.This slide and the next five that follow have classroom score changes over the academic year. First, I will show you the performance in Math. Then I will do the same for Reading.Here, before gamifying my class, we performed much like classrooms everywhere. I taught a multi-age class that year and I have only included the data of the third graders here. That is why you see few students.What you see is very little change in student percentile. As a result, the class average from Fall to Winter shows no movement. Although, the data is not on this slide, the story Is much the same for the Fall to Spring period.
  • Things start happening in the very first year of Gamification. In the data on the left hand side, the students in my class, that began by being candidates to join the “not proficient” group, make significant gains. Students in the middle also make gains. By Spring, the class average moves double digits in comparison to the previous year.Additionally, as you can see, the students in the gamified classroom also outperform those who were not.
  • Last year, the second year of gamifying, the Math performance pattern of growth continues. Students who started low in the Fall grew significantly compared to my own classroom before gamification. The class also makes double digit growth when compared to the non-gamified classrooms in the same year.
  • On to Reading. This is before gamification in my class. You see virtually no change from Fall to Winter. Fall to Spring data is not shown, but the year ended without much change.
  • The first year of gamification bears similar fruits for Reading as it did for Math.You see real momentum for the students who began substantially behind their peers. Students in the middle too make pretty solid progress. As a result, the class makes a double digit growth from Fall to Spring.
  • As you can see, the student performance growth continued last year compared to my own students from two years ago and with the peers in the same year.
  • My students have ranged the spectrum of academic abilities, behavior needs, demographics, ethnicity, levels of family support and so forth. Being in a gamified classroom has helped them all.
  • One teacher to many students, is a design mismatch to meet the individual needs of the students. Unfortunately, this is the dominant method we practice. Before gamifying, I did this too.A student who cannot add to twenty, or can’t decode words, should not be on tasks that are too difficult. Gamifying the classroom has helped me match the content to each learners need.In a non-gamified classroom, the time given for learning a topic is fixed but how much a student learns varies. In a gamified classroom, the time to learn a topic to mastery varies, but the learning is constant. This allows all learners to advance, become experts over time and help each other along the way.
  • Here are some actions and I urge you to consider acting on some of them. I am sure you are already thinking about more. Keep in mind, in Minnesota alone there are fifty seven thousand third graders.With your professional interest in gamification, if there is anything you can do to help children, it would be to take actions that will help them learn through play.I hope you will consider making it a personal mission to help move the needle for them. My homework assignment for you is to go gamify someone&apos;s school year.
  • Ananth Pai - "Gamifying the Classroom: An Inspirational Teacher’s Story of Making Education Fun"

    1. 1. “…companies like Best Buy and others spend millions of dollars on education …”Robert Stephens, CTO of Best Buy & Founder of Geeksquad<br />Should those $’s go to gamifying learning?<br />Ananth Pai, 3rd Grade Teacher<br />(teaching plus or minus a few grades at all times)<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    2. 2. Importance of third grade<br />and primary years<br /><ul><li>Nationally, nearly 7 out of 10 third graders are not proficient in Math when they graduate. The decline starts in third grade.
    3. 3. California forecasts prison capacity on the basis of Reading proficiency scores in third grade
    4. 4. Gamification professionals can help</li></ul>Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    5. 5. National Award Winning Video of my Classroom about students’ civic action<br />2009-10, first year of gamification, generates student written petition to gamify classrooms everywhere<br />Nearly two hundred visitors including many teachers, community members, legislators, business leaders visit our room<br />Petition Online<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    6. 6.
    7. 7. Are students performing better in Math?<br />2008-09, Pre-gamification year, my students<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    8. 8. 2009-10, Math<br />1st year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    9. 9. 2010-11, Math<br />2nd year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />
    10. 10. Are students performing better in Reading?<br />2008-09, Pre-gamification year, my class<br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    11. 11. 2009-10, Reading 1st year ofGamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms <br />Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    12. 12. 2010-11, Reading<br />2nd year of<br />Gamified classroom vs.<br />non-gamified classrooms<br />
    13. 13. Who can’t be advanced to proficiency by gamification?<br /><ul><li>Absentees, although students hate to be absent
    14. 14. Significant reading impairment
    15. 15. The rest thrive, regardless of special needs, behavior needs, giftedness etc.</li></ul>Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    16. 16. Gamified classroom benefits<br /><ul><li>Games align to the learner at all times X number of students in a class
    17. 17. Feedback leads and guides, minimally invasive
    18. 18. Learn from hierarchy of expert peers
    19. 19. Play when you get home, NO HOMEWORK!</li></ul>Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />
    20. 20. Homework for the<br />conference audience!<br /><ul><li>Evangelize gamification of classrooms in your community
    21. 21. Fund gamifying a classroom (costs less than a smartboard)
    22. 22. Help your company to direct education grants to gamify classrooms
    23. 23. Send people to sign my students’ petition and help gamify all classrooms</li></ul>Contact:ananthpaius@gmail.com , Twitter: @ananthpaius<br />

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