Birth Of Thin Film Cd Te And Cigs Pv Handout

1,653 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,653
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
15
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
83
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Birth Of Thin Film Cd Te And Cigs Pv Handout

  1. 1. Birth of Thin Film CdTe and CIS  Solar PV in the US Market Ken Zweibel Director Institute for Analysis of Solar Energy George Washington University
  2. 2. CdTe and CIS • Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and alloys of copper  indium diselenide with gallium and sulfur (CIS) • Key 2nd generation, thin film photovoltaic  module technologies aimed at reducing  system cost • Challenging semiconductor‐based PV options  with almost no prior science or technology  base
  3. 3. Now and Then • 1980 – Decent small area solar cells – Huge scale‐up challenges (module area and  throughput) – Little or no market pull • Today – CdTe: Made by the single largest thin film  manufacturing company (First Solar) and providing the  lowest‐cost solar systems – CIS: The largest focus of solar venture capital  investment
  4. 4. Context • From 1980 to 2003, the solar market was  almost negligible • Solar was ten times more expensive than  conventional electricity (50 c/kWh versus 5) • Climate change was an annoying background  issue • Huge technical challenges existed without the  money to overcome them
  5. 5. Cash Flow • Lack of commercial revenue prevented – Investment in R&D to move technologies closer to  product – Improve the product from its rudimentary levels • Funds came from – Government – Individual wealthy visionary investors – Oil companies and a few others (“green wash?”) – Not from venture capital (lack of market)
  6. 6. The Interregnum • During 1980 to 2003 – Small area cell conversion efficiencies rose to  respectable levels – Processes were developed to scale‐up areas to  product (“module”) sizes (10,000‐fold size  increase) – The first decent modules were made – Pilot lines were built and usually failed (another  10,000 fold product area increase)
  7. 7. Companies That Built Pilot Lines • CdTe • CIS alloys Coors – Golden Photon – ARCO Solar, Siemens  – Solar, Shell Solar, Showa  Matsushita – Shell BP Solar – – Boeing Solar Cells Inc. – – EPV Antec (Germany) – – Wurth (Germany) – ITN Global Solar
  8. 8. Production as of 2003 • CdTe – 5‐15 MW/yr – Antec – First Solar (was Solar Cells Inc.) • CIS – Pilot lines at Wurth and Global Solar (sub 5  MW/yr) • That is – literally nothing
  9. 9. A Tale of Two Technologies 2003 CdTe 2003 CIS Alloys 2003 • One key corporate leader  • No mature, successful  (First Solar) with substantial  approach to full‐scale  investment and almost  manufacturing mature technology • Spectrum of participants  – Walton Family (Wal‐Mart  and investors heirs) • Little or no venture capital – Management knowledgeable  • Best small‐area cell  and confident of its product’s  efficiency of any thin film  value and potential (“story rich”)
  10. 10. What Happened in 2003? • Pre‐2003, Japanese Subsidies (small but a  start) • Post‐2003, Substantial German Subsidies – Huge new market – Huge revenue growth – Cash flow circulated into technology development  and economies of scale – Companies and VCs got interested got wind at  backs to take risk of scale‐up
  11. 11. CdTe Today • Half a gigawatt of annual production • Nearly a gigawatt of production next year • One major company (First Solar) – Five others • Antec – still producing low‐efficiency modules in small volumes • Two start‐ups corporate owners (Calyxo by Q‐Cells and PrimeStar  Solar by GE) • Two with VC investment (AVA, Arendi) • First Solar  – Lowest cost producer of modules and systems in all of PV – Among the largest PV companies in the world by volume
  12. 12. First Solar Capacity Expansion 1,104MW 720MW 308MW ∼100MW 25MW 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2005 and 2006 based on Q4 06 run rate 2008 – 2009 based on Q2 08 run  2007  based on Q4 07 run rate rate
  13. 13. First Solar Module Cost Per Watt Trend $1.01/W Core Cost in 2008 Q3
  14. 14. CdTe, PV Cost Leader • A 40 MW system in Waldpolenz Solar Park, Germany: at the  time of its announcement, it was both the largest planned  and lowest cost PV system in the world: 3.25 euros or $4.2  per watt. [36] • A 7.5 MW system in Blythe, CA, where the California Public  Utilities Commission has accepted a 12 ¢/kWh power  purchase agreement with First Solar (after the application  of all incentives). [37] Defined in California as the quot;Market  Referent Price,quot; this is the price the PUC will pay for any  daytime peaking power source, e.g., natural gas.  • A contract for two megawatts of rooftop installations with  Southern California Edison, where the SCE program is  designed to install 250 MW at a total cost of $875M  (averaging $3.5 per watt), after incentives. [38]
  15. 15. CIS Alloys Today Trying to combine best aspects of sunlight‐to‐electricity conversion  • efficiency with low cost – 20% small‐area solar cell (versus 16.5% for CdTe) – 15% minimodule (versus 12% for CdTe) – But cost and manufacturing are huge challenges Small production (under 25 MW/yr) from • Wurth (funded by wealthy individual) – Showa Shell (Shell Japan) – Honda – Global Solar (Utility funding, then PV company, Solon, buyout) – Avancis (Shell and St. Gobain) – Solyndra – Huge number of competing start‐up companies with different approaches  • (50?) funded by VCs – Most building pilot or production lines • Nanosolar, Miasole, Heliovolt, etc.
  16. 16. CIS Has Strained the VC Approach • Very high level of investment to get through  cell‐to‐module scale‐up • Another large investment for first factory • Potential for several multi‐year delays • Very high pre‐production valuations if value of  initial investments are to be sustained • Probably a combination of the attractions of  solar and dot‐com nostalgia – Mostly a silicon valley phenomenon
  17. 17. Lux Energy Summit 2008, Matthew Nordan
  18. 18. Gronet said Solyndra has raised $600 million in  equity from investors including the Virgin  Seven funds known to have invested in  Green Fund, Madrone Capital Partners,  Miasole’s latest round — Miasole, one of the  RockPort Capital Partners, Argonaut Capital  biggest thin‐film solar startups, has been  Partners, Redpoint Ventures, US Venture  raising a $200 million round. So far, the  Partners and CMEA Ventures. It was reported  company has obtained commitments from  last year that Solyndra raised $79 million. seven funds. Miasole is believed to have raised  $50 million in a series D round last autumn.  Nanosolar Ups Funding to $0.5B; Partners  Strategically for Solar Utility Power August 27, 2008  By Martin Roscheisen, CEO As part of a strategic $300 million equity  financing, Nanosolar has added new capital  AVA (CdTe): This $104  and brought its total amount of funding to  million funding was led  date to just below half a billion U.S. dollars. by DCM and included  new investors  Technology Partners,  HelioVolt Corp., an Austin company pioneering  GLG Partners and  the use of powerful and durable quot;thin‐filmquot;  Bohemian Companies,  solar materials, said Wednesday it has raised  LLC as well as prior  $77 million in a second round of investment. investors, including  Invus, LP.
  19. 19. Changing VC Model • VCs have problems with longer‐term, higher  risk, more capital‐intense technologies – And complex technologies for which they lack  specialist knowledge • But shifting societal needs mean that these  are the ones with the highest potential payoff • VCs adapt to the new opportunity
  20. 20. Acknowledgements • Matthew Nordan, Lux Research, for gathering  data on VC investments in thin films in US and  conceptualizing the structure of VC investing  as “broken” for these investments

×