POC_Ch18

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POC_Ch18

  1. 1. “One picture is worth a thousand18 words.” ―Fred Barnard, 19th Century British illustrator Using Visual Aids
  2. 2. After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Explain the importance of using visual aids.• Differentiate between types of informational graphics and when they are used.• Identify types of illustrations.• Describe techniques for properly using visual aids. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  3. 3. Types of Visual Aids • Visual aids are generally considered as: – informational graphics – illustrations • Informational graphics present data in a chart, table, or graph. • Illustrations show images in photos or line drawings. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  4. 4. Types of Visual Aids • Charts are informational graphics. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  5. 5. 1. What are the two general types of visual aids?2. What is the difference between informational graphics and illustrations? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  6. 6. Informational Graphics • Used to: – emphasize specific details that need attention – visually break up a large block of text on a page • Present data through: – bar charts – line charts – pie charts – tables – organizational charts – flowcharts • Most common are bar, line, and pie charts © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  7. 7. Informational Graphics • Bar charts show a comparison of data. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  8. 8. Informational Graphics • Line charts show patterns, trends, and changes over time. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  9. 9. Informational Graphics • Pie charts show the relationship of parts of something to the whole. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  10. 10. Informational Graphics • Tables present information in a series of columns and rows. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  11. 11. Informational Graphics • Organizational charts show the communication protocol or structure within a company or organization. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  12. 12. Informational Graphics • Flowcharts show steps or processes. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  13. 13. 1. Why are informational graphics used?2. What are the three most commonly used informational graphics? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  14. 14. Illustrations • Illustrations are used to show an idea as an image instead of as data. – photos – drawings – maps – clipart • Photos show real life. • Drawings describe buildings, layouts, or when reader needs to see how narrative would appear in real life. • Maps show geography or destinations. • Clipart is images used to enhance the presentation. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  15. 15. 1. When would an illustration be used instead of an informational graphic?2. List four common types of illustrations. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  16. 16. Techniques That Work • Not all information lends itself to the use of a visual aid. • The first step is to identify the purpose of the visual aid. • Will the visual aid: – help to quickly and directly present the data? – highlight the most important facts? – help the reader understand the data? – help to convince the audience? – help the audience to remember the data? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  17. 17. Techniques That Work • Creating the plan – Identify the purpose. – Identify the audience. – Identify the situation. – Select the main ideas. – Determine the organization. – Determine what visual aids are needed. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  18. 18. Techniques That Work • How visual aids are used. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  19. 19. Techniques That Work • Identifying visual aids – Assign a figure number to identify and reference the visual aid in the text. – Write a caption; descriptive text to identify the purpose. – Use source lines to identify the owner of the visual aid. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  20. 20. Techniques That Work • Creating and placing visual aids – To create visual aids: • use application software • avoid overuse of visuals • avoid over-labeling – Place visual aids: • as close as possible to the reference (rule of thumb) • leave appropriate white space for readability © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  21. 21. Techniques That Work • Keep visual aids ethical. – Do not misrepresent information. – Do not mislead with information. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  22. 22. 1. What is the first step for selecting visual aids?2. What is a caption?3. What is the rule of thumb for placing a visual aid in a written document? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  23. 23. • There are two general types of visual aids: informational graphics and illustrations.• Types of informational graphics include graphs and charts, tables, and flowcharts.• Illustrations show images.• Choose a visual aid that will enhance your message and communicate what is important for the reader to understand. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.

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