POC_Ch16

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POC_Ch16

  1. 1. “There is no substitute for hard16 work.” ― Thomas Edison, American inventorWriting and Interviewing for Employment
  2. 2. After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Organize information about your work experience and education to plan and write an effective résumé.• Describe the parts of a résumé.• Explain the two basic formats of a résumé.• List different ways in which you can publish your résumé.• Write a persuasive cover letter that expresses your job goals and qualifications.• Identify the steps to prepare for a job interview. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  3. 3. • Explain the importance of evaluating your performance in an interview.• Write follow-up messages after a job interview.• Describe the employment process.• Discuss how to research and plan for a career. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  4. 4. Writing a Résumé • Résumé (pronounced rez-uh-may) – gives an employer a profile of your career goals, education, and work history – purpose is to sell yourself to a potential employer – snapshot telling who you are and why you would be an asset as an employee © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  5. 5. Writing a Résumé • Use the writing process as your guide. • Start with prewriting activities. • Match words in the job description on your résumé. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  6. 6. 1. What is the chief purpose of a résumé?2. What words and phrases should you match in a résumé? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  7. 7. Parts of the Résumé • Name and personal information – name – address – telephone number – e-mail address (for professional communication only) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  8. 8. Parts of the Résumé • Summary – optional – valuable for people who have considerable experience and expertise in a particular field • Career objective – optional – can be general or specific description of the position you are seeking • A summary statement and career objective can be combined and either heading may be used. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  9. 9. Parts of the Résumé • Work experience – This section is the main focus for the employer. – Begin with your current or most recent employer. – List the positions you held, dates of employment, and names and locations of employers. – Describe the work experience with each employer. – Use action verbs. – Activities outside of school or work, such as volunteer work, can show experience relevant to the job. – Use keywords asrésumés may be scanned for wordsthat relate to the functions of the position. – Use words that reflect latest language in the field. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  10. 10. Parts of the Résumé • Education – Begin with the most recent diploma or degree earned. – List certifications you earned, special courses or training programs completed, or other educational achievements related to the position. • Honors/awards/publications – Employers look for well-rounded individuals. – Employers are especially interested in applicants who are community oriented. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  11. 11. Parts of the Résumé • Memberships and professional affiliations • Special skills or additional training • References – person who knows you well and can comment on your qualifications, work ethic, personal qualities, and work-related aspects of your character – provided only on request by employer © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  12. 12. 1. Which section of the résumé is the main focus for an employer?2. Why would you list any activities outside of school or work?3. When are references provided to an employer? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  13. 13. Drafting, Revising, Editing, andProofreading Your Résumé • Draft. Select the standard parts or categories of information that best fit your situation. Follow the guidelines given in this chapter for writing descriptions of your job duties and achievements. • Revise. Résumés should be one page for applicants with shorter work histories and two pages for more experienced applicants. A great deal of the revision work involves making the information fit the one- or two-page format. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  14. 14. Drafting, Revising, Editing, andProofreading Your Résumé • Edit. Be sure to use the keywords for which the employer will be looking. Describe your past work duties and achievements in language that represents current usage in the field. Use words and phrases that appear in the job description so your résumé can be scanned for these words. • Format. Select the format that best suits your information and the job for which you are applying. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  15. 15. Drafting, Revising, Editing, andProofreading Your Résumé • Review. Whenever possible, enlist the opinion of someone who is a good writer and who has experience with résumés. • Check spelling/grammar and proofread. An error-free résumé is essential. Errors in a résumé give the employer a poor impression of you and your attention to detail. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  16. 16. Résumé Formats• Chronological résumé – emphasizes employers and work experience with them – most recent employer appears first © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  17. 17. Résumé Formats• Functional résumé – lists work experience according to categories of skills – highlights your best skills © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  18. 18. Résumé Formats• Electronic résumé – complete on a Web site – attachment to an e-mail• Scannablerésumé – Do not use unusual fonts the reader may not have. – Use a one-column format. – Avoid horizontal lines, boxes, or shading. – Avoid asterisks, dashes, parentheses, and brackets. – Use all capital letters for headings. – Do not use italics, underlining, or graphics. – Double-space between items in each section. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  19. 19. 1. What are the two basic formats for a résumé?2. Why should you use only common fonts in a résumé that is to be submitted electronically? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  20. 20. Publishing Your Résumé • Publishing is the process of making the résumé available to the person who needs to receive it. – print (traditional method) – fax – e-mail (electronic) – online (electronic) Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  21. 21. 1. What is the traditional way in which a résumé is published?2. List two ways a résumé may be published electronically. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  22. 22. Cover Messages• A cover message is a letter or e-mail sent with a résumé to introduce yourself and summarize your reasons for applying for a job – do not repeat the details in your résumé – do provide a summary highlighting your key qualifications• Three parts of a cover letter: – introduction – body – conclusion © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  23. 23. Cover Messages• Typical cover letter © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  24. 24. 1. What is the purpose of a cover message?2. What are the three basic parts of a cover message? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  25. 25. Job Interview • Job interview – The first step is to learn as much as you can about the company and job. – Fully research the job and company before the interview. – The interview is the employer’s opportunity to see if you are qualified and to assess you as an individual. – This is your opportunity to sell yourself in person. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  26. 26. Job Interview • Dress appropriately in the interview. – Dress conservatively. – Avoid trendy dress, which may be seen as inappropriate. Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  27. 27. Job Interview • Dress appropriately © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  28. 28. Job Interview • Prepare for questions likely to be asked. – What makes you a good employee? – What are your strengths and weaknesses? – Tell me something about yourself. – Describe the experience you have that relates to the position. – What type of position are you interested in? – What do you plan to be doing five years from now? – What type of work environment do you prefer? – Why do you want to work for this organization? – Are you willing to work overtime? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  29. 29. Job Interview • Ask questions in the interview. – What are the specific duties for this position? – To whom will I report in this position? – Do you have a policy of promoting employees and of providing on-the-job training? – What are the working hours? – Is travel, weekend work, or overtime required? – What is the salary you are offering? – What is the anticipated start date if I am hired? – When do you expect to make your decision? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  30. 30. Job Interview • Practice questions so you appear relaxed, organized, competent, and professional in the interview. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  31. 31. 1. What is the first step in preparing for a job interview?2. Why should you practice answering questions that are likely to be asked in a job interview? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  32. 32. 3. Why is it better to dress more conservatively for a job interview rather than more trendy? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  33. 33. Evaluating the Interview • Evaluate your interview performance as soon as possible after the interview. – Evaluating is a way to improve for the next interview. – Make a list of what you feel you did right and wrong. – Every interview is a chance to practice, so do not feel your time was wasted if you find you are not interested in the job. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  34. 34. Evaluating the Interview • Ask yourself questions about the interview. – Was I adequately prepared? – Did I remember to bring copies of documents? – Was I on time for the interview? – Did I talk too much or too little? – Did I honestly and completely answer the interviewer’s questions? – Did I dress appropriately? – Did I display nervous behavior – Did I come across as composed and confident? – What questions could I have handled better? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  35. 35. 1. When should you evaluate your performance in a job interview?2. Why is it important to evaluate your performance in a job interview? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  36. 36. Interview Follow-Up Messages • Immediately after the interview, send a thank-you message. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  37. 37. Interview Follow-Up Messages • If offered the job, send an acceptance message. – This is your first official act as a new employee. – The letter must be well written. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  38. 38. Interview Follow-Up Messages • If declining an offer, send a message stating only facts. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  39. 39. Interview Follow-Up Messages • If withdrawing from the process, send a withdrawal message stating you no longer wish to be an applicant. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  40. 40. 1. When should you write a thank-you message for a job interview?2. Why is it important to develop a well-crafted acceptance message? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  41. 41. 3. When writing a message declining a job offer, why is it important to be positive in the message? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  42. 42. Employment Process• Complete a job application form. – printed form – online Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  43. 43. Employment Process• The employer will conduct an employment verification. – checking your employment history information – usually checks just dates, job titles, and other objective data• The employer will do a background check into your personal data. – credit reports – driving record (if relevant to the job) – criminal record © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  44. 44. 1. What are two ways in which a job application form may be completed?2. What is employment verification?3. What are three things that may be part of a background check by an employer? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  45. 45. Career Planning • There are many ways to research career opportunities – career aptitude tests • personal interests • strengths • weaknesses – Internet – career handbooks – professional organizations – networking—speaking with people you know • helps evaluate opportunities • may lead to job offers © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  46. 46. 1. What do career aptitude tests measure?2. What is networking, as related to a career search? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  47. 47. • A résumé is a document that provides potential employers a profile of your career goals, your work history, and your job qualifications.• The most important part of your résumé is the listing of your work experience and achievements.• Consider which format will best present your information to the potential employer. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  48. 48. • Résumés are traditionally printed and mailed.• A cover message is an introduction to who you are and why you are the right person for the position, but should not repeat all of the information on your résumé.• The job interview is the opportunity to impress the interviewer that you are the person for the job.• As soon as possible after the interview, review your performance. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  49. 49. • Immediately after your interview, follow up with a thank-you letter.• At some point in the employment process, you will need to complete an application form for the Human Resources Department to keep on file. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.

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