“Speak clearly, if you speak at all;12         carve every word before you let it         fall.”              ― Oliver Wen...
After completing the chapter, you will be able to:•   Describe oral presentations.•   Identify the steps to plan a success...
Oral Presentations • An oral presentation is a speech, address, or   presentation given to a group. • Presentations:    – ...
1. What is an oral presentation?2. How does an audience typically participate in a   presentation?                        ...
Planning a Presentation • Identify the purpose—pass on information, respond   to questions and requests, make a request, d...
1. What are five general purposes a presentation   may serve?2. What are demographics?3. How are most oral presentations d...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Introduction   – introduce the topic   – draw the listener into the presentation • B...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Effective presentation techniques    – use facts; make an analogy      (comparison o...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use visual displays, which are large graphic   elements that accompany the presentat...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use demonstrations in your presentation to show   the product or idea.              ...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use handouts (leave-behinds), which are printed   materials that you distribute to t...
Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Presentation notes help you stay on track.                           © Goodheart-Wil...
1. What are the three basic parts of a presentation   draft?2. What is an analogy?3. What are visual elements in a present...
Giving a Presentation • Evaluate yourself • Become aware of how you sound—record your   voice   – Is the volume of your vo...
Common Errors in Pronunciation • Dropping Sounds at the End of Words   – For example, do you drop the g in ing words and s...
Common Errors in Pronunciation • Altering Vowel Sounds    – For example, do you say GEN-you-in (correct) or      GEN-you-i...
Common Errors in Pronunciation • Mispronouncing Words   – Many people make the mistake of pronouncing     words just as th...
Giving a Presentation • How is your body language? • Practice speaking in front of a friend.    –   Did you make eye conta...
Giving a Presentation • As the old saying goes, practice makes perfect!                           © Goodheart-Willcox Co.,...
1. When learning to control your voice, what is the   first thing you should do?2. What are five things you can do to cont...
3. If a question is off topic, what can you do?                         © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc.   Permission granted...
• An oral presentation is a speech, address, or  presentation given to a group.• Identify purpose, audience, situation, ma...
POC_Ch12
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POC_Ch12

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POC_Ch12

  1. 1. “Speak clearly, if you speak at all;12 carve every word before you let it fall.” ― Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., American jurist Giving Presentations
  2. 2. After completing the chapter, you will be able to:• Describe oral presentations.• Identify the steps to plan a successful presentation.• Prepare the content for a presentation.• List techniques for being a skilled presenter. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  3. 3. Oral Presentations • An oral presentation is a speech, address, or presentation given to a group. • Presentations: – vary in length, topic, and audience and may be formal or informal – may be made by one person or a group of people – may include a question-and-answer session for audience participation © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  4. 4. 1. What is an oral presentation?2. How does an audience typically participate in a presentation? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  5. 5. Planning a Presentation • Identify the purpose—pass on information, respond to questions and requests, make a request, direct others, or persuade • Analyze the audience—what are the demographics, or information about the audience • How much time do you have to present • Gather information for your presentation • Determine delivery method; usually in person or Web – slideshow – flash based – video conference © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  6. 6. 1. What are five general purposes a presentation may serve?2. What are demographics?3. How are most oral presentations delivered? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  7. 7. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Introduction – introduce the topic – draw the listener into the presentation • Body – select direct or indirect approach – points should appear in a logical order – as you finish each main point, summarize it • Conclusion – summarize the presentation – restate main points and relate to the purpose of presentation © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  8. 8. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Effective presentation techniques – use facts; make an analogy (comparison of unlike things) when appropriate – use humor when appropriate – use visuals – use presentation notes to help stay on track with presentation Shutterstock © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  9. 9. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use visual displays, which are large graphic elements that accompany the presentation such as slideshows, flip charts, and whiteboards. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  10. 10. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use demonstrations in your presentation to show the product or idea. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  11. 11. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Use handouts (leave-behinds), which are printed materials that you distribute to the audience. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  12. 12. Preparing Contentfor a Presentation • Presentation notes help you stay on track. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  13. 13. 1. What are the three basic parts of a presentation draft?2. What is an analogy?3. What are visual elements in a presentation? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  14. 14. Giving a Presentation • Evaluate yourself • Become aware of how you sound—record your voice – Is the volume of your voice appropriate? – Did you speak too fast or too slow? – Did you pronounce words correctly? – Did words run together, word endings dropped, or extra syllables added? – Did you avoid words/phrases such as “um,” “you know,” and “like”? – Did you emphasize points enough, too much, or too little? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  15. 15. Common Errors in Pronunciation • Dropping Sounds at the End of Words – For example, do you drop the g in ing words and say runnin’, eating’, or workin’? Do you drop the final t when you say words such as list and tourist? Do you drop the final d in words such as field and build? • Omitting Letters and Sounds – For example, consider the word introduce. The correct pronuncitation is IN-tro-duce, not IN-ter-duce. • Adding Sounds – For example, do you say ATH-a-lete? The correct pronunciation is ATH-lete. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  16. 16. Common Errors in Pronunciation • Altering Vowel Sounds – For example, do you say GEN-you-in (correct) or GEN-you-ine (incorrect)? • Stressing the Wrong Syllable – For example, you should say in-COM-pa-ra-ble, not in- com-PAR-a-ble, and in-SUR-ance, not IN-sur-ance. (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  17. 17. Common Errors in Pronunciation • Mispronouncing Words – Many people make the mistake of pronouncing words just as they appear in writing. For example, do you pronounce the word epitome as i-PIT-i-me (correct) or I-pi-tome (incorrect)? Another common mispronunciation is aks (incorrect) instead of ask (correct). • Using Incorrect Words – For example, for the verb form of orientation, do you say orient (correct) or orientate (incorrect)? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  18. 18. Giving a Presentation • How is your body language? • Practice speaking in front of a friend. – Did you make eye contact with the listener? – Did you stand still and avoid unnecessary gestures? – Did you stand up straight? – Did you smile? – Did you dress appropriately? – Were you prepared to answer audience questions? • If a question is off topic, ask the person to see you after the presentation is over. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  19. 19. Giving a Presentation • As the old saying goes, practice makes perfect! © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  20. 20. 1. When learning to control your voice, what is the first thing you should do?2. What are five things you can do to control your body language? (continued) © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  21. 21. 3. If a question is off topic, what can you do? © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.
  22. 22. • An oral presentation is a speech, address, or presentation given to a group.• Identify purpose, audience, situation, main ideas, organization, and materials needed.• Begin with an introduction, main points, subtopics, and end with a conclusion.• Practice your presentation until you are comfortable with what you are going to say. © Goodheart-Willcox Co., Inc. Permission granted to reproduce for educational use only.

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