Chapter12a

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  • Relation to textThis slide relates to page 391 of the text.
    Summary OverviewThis slide shows the ways that magazines and newspapers differ from broadcast media. Specifically, they:
    Present detailed information that can be processed at the reader’s own pace
    Are not intrusive like radio and TV; they require some effort on the part of the reader for the advertising message to have an impact. (high-involvement media)
    Have high readership. Despite the growth of new media options, 84% of adults read magazines, and they read an average of 11 issues per month.
    Reach a selective audience, both in types of consumers and market segments.
    Use of this slideUse this slide to explain the role of magazine and newspapers in an advertiser’s media plan.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 391 and Exhibit 12-1 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Magazines are the most specialized of all advertising media. While some, such as Readers’ Digest and Newsweek, are mass-appeal magazines, most are targeted to a very specific audience.
    This slide shows examples of magazines that target specific businesses and industries, as well as individuals engaged in various professions. Business publications are important to marketers because they provide an efficient way of reaching the specific types of individuals who constitute their target market.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show the various types of business magazines available to advertisers wanting to reach specific types of consumers.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to page 392 of the text.
    Summary OverviewThe media research company SRDS, the primary reference source on periodicals for media planners, divides magazines into three broad categories, based on the audience to which they are directed:
    Consumer
    Farm
    Business
    Each Category is then further classified according to the magazine’s editorial content and audience appeal.
    Use of this slideThis slide can be used to introduce the three broad categories into which magazines are classified.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 392-393 and Exhibit 12-2 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Consumer magazines represent the major portion of the magazine industry, accounting for nearly two-thirds of all advertising dollars spent in magazines. Consumer magazines are best suited to marketers interested in reaching general consumers, as well to companies trying to reach a specific target market.
    This slide shows a cover of Transworld Snow Boarding, which is a magazine that targets serious snow boarders. The magazine’s editorial content also creates a very favorable advertising environment for skiing-related products and services.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show an example of a specialty magazine that is designed to reach a specific market segment. You might discuss how there are specialty magazines that reach nearly every type of interest or activity and provide a good way for marketers to reach these consumers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 392-393 and Figure 12-1 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows the top ten magazines in terms of subscriptions and single-copy sales. Magazines can also be classified by frequency; weekly, monthly, and bimonthly are the most common.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the top magazines sold in the U.S. Most of them are consumer magazines with mass audience appeal. Thus, they are popular among advertisers of consumer products and services.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to page 393 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Farm publications range from general interest publications aimed at all types of farmers, to those in specialized agricultural areas, such as poultry farming or cattle raising. There are about 300 publications tailored to nearly every possible type of farming or agricultural interest. This slide shows a cover of Beef magazine, which is targeted to cattle ranchers.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to show an example of a farm publication, and explain that farm publications are not classified with business publications because historically farms were not perceived as businesses.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to page 393 of the text.
    Summary OverviewBusiness publications are those magazines or trade journals published for specific businesses, industries, or occupations. Standard Rate and Data Service breaks down over 9,300 U.S. business publications into more than 220 market classifications. Major classifications include:
    Specific professional groups, such as National Law Review for lawyers and Architectural Forum for architects
    Industrial magazines, targeted to those in various manufacturing and productions industries. Examples are Iron and Steelmaker, Chemical Week, and Industrial Engineering.
    Trade magazines, targeted to wholesalers, dealers, distributors, and retailers. Among them are Progressive Grocer, Drug Store News, Women’s Wear Daily, and Restaurant Business.
    General business magazines, aimed at executives in all areas of business. Examples are Forbes, Fortune, and BusinessWeek.
    Healthcare publications, which target dental, medical, nursing, biotechnical sciences, and hospital administration.
    Use of this slideUse this slide to introduce the various categories into which business publications are divided.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 389-390 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows a copy of The Daily Aztec, the newspaper published by students at San Diego State University, It is an example of a paper that is targeting college students. More than 1,300 colleges and universities publish newspapers that offer advertisers an excellent medium for reaching college students.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show an example of a special audience newspaper. College newspapers such as this are an excellent way to reach college students for both local and national advertisers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 393-402 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Magazines have a number of advantages and disadvantages as an advertising medium. The advantages include:
    Selectivity.. the ability to reach a specific target audience.
    Reproduction quality… high-quality paper stock and printing.
    Creative flexibility… huge flexibility in terms of the type, size, and placement of advertising material.
    Permanence… magazines remain in the home longer than any other medium.
    Prestige… products gain prestige when advertised in publications with a favorable image.
    Receptivity, engagement… studies show that consumers become involved with magazines when they read them.
    Services… may include such things as sales assistance, research studies, split runs, selective binding, and personalized messages.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the advantages of using magazines as an advertising medium. Despite the disadvantages of magazines, they have a considerable number of characteristics that make them an attractive medium for advertisers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 396 and Exhibit 12-5 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows the various city magazines published in major American cities. These magazines have experienced tremendous growth, as advertisers are able to focus on specific local markets that may be of interest to them. These publications also have a readership profile that appeals to marketers of upscale brands: high income, college educated, loyal, and influential in their communities.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the geographical selectivity of magazines. City and other regional magazines make it possible for advertisers to effectively target consumers in particular geographic areas. City magazines are also part of a network that makes it possible for advertisers to purchase an ad in all of these magazines with one contract.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 397 and Exhibit 12-6 in the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows a page from the media kit for Reader’s Digest magazine. It lists the various regional editions available to advertisers.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used as an example of the type of information provided by magazines in a media kit. Magazines provide prospective advertisers with media kits that contain information about the magazine such as editorial content, advertising rates, special issues, closing dates and mechanical requirements for ads as well as information about the publication’s readers. This information can be used by media planners and buyers in evaluating the magazine in terms of how well it reaches their target audience and in deciding whether they want to advertise in a specific issue.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 397-398 of the text, and Exhibit 12-7.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows some of the special features and options that are available when advertising in magazines. Some magazines offer a variety of special options such as:
    Gatefolds – fold outs that give an extra large spread
    Bleed pages – ad extends to the edge of the paper, no margins or white space
    Pop-ups – three dimensional special ads that stand up when the page is opened
    Inserts – such as return cards, coupons, and product samples
    Cover positions – special positions such as back, inside front, inside back
    Creative space buys – advertisers purchase space units in certain combinations to increase impact
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show the various special magazine options available to advertisers that can enhance the creative appeal of the ad and increase attention and readership.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 398 and Exhibit 12-8 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows examples of quarter page ads that were used by WD-40, an all purpose lubrication product. The quarter-page ads were run on consecutive pages within the same magazines with each ad mentioning different uses of the product. This strategy gives the company greater impact for its media dollars and is helpful in promoting the product’s variety of uses.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show an example of a creative space buy in a magazine. Some magazines let their advertisers buy space in certain combinations to increase the impact of their media budgets.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 393-402 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Magazines have a number of disadvantages as an advertising medium, including:
    Costs… based on size of the audience and their selectivity. A full-page, four-color ad in Time magazine cost $256,000 in 2008.
    Limited reach and frequency… not as effective as other media when it comes to reach and frequency.
    Long lead time… most major publications have a 30- to 60-day lead time, and don’t allow changes after a specified date.
    Clutter and competition… the more successful a magazine becomes, the more advertising it attracts, which leads to greater clutter.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the disadvantages of using magazines as an advertising medium.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 402-403 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows a list of common magazine terms used in measuring circulation and readership. Media buyers evaluate magazines on the basis of their ability to deliver the advertiser’s message to as many people as possible in the target audience. To do this, they must consider the circulation of the publication as well as its total readership.
    Key circulation concepts include:
    Primary circulation – number of individuals who receive a publication through subscription or store purchase
    Guaranteed circulation – the number of copies of the magazines that the publisher expects to sell. If this figure is not reached advertisers may be given a partial refund
    Circulation verification – magazine circulations are audited by a verification service
    Pass-along readership – primary subscriber or purchaser gives a magazine to another person
    Controlled circulation – copies are sent (free) to individuals who influence purchases
    Total audience – primary circulation plus pass along readership
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the various magazine circulation concepts.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to page 404 of the text.
    Summary OverviewAdvertisers are often interested in the number of people a publication reaches as a result of secondary (pass-along) readership. This occurs when the original purchaser gives a publication to another person, or when it is read in waiting rooms, beauty salons, airplanes, and so on.
    Total audience is calculated by multiplying the number of readers per copy by the circulation of an average issue. A magazine such as Time may have a circulation base of 3.3 million, but an audience guarantee of over 19 million, because it has a pass-along rate that yields up to six readers per copy.
    Total readership estimates are reported by major syndicated magazine research services, but media buyers view these numbers with suspicion.
    Use of this slideThis slide can be used as part of a discussion about the difference between primary readers and total audience.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to pp. 404-405 of the text.
    Summary OverviewThe SRDS Media Solutions company maintains a proprietary database of standardized ad rates, circulation figures, dates, general requirements, contact information, links to online media kits, Web sites, and audit statements.
    Media planners are also interested in a match between the magazine’s readers and the advertisers’ target audience. Most magazines provide media planners with reports detailing readers’ demographics, financial profile, lifestyle, and product usage characteristics. Audience information is generally more limited for business publications, because the widely dispersed readership and nature of business publication readers make audience research more difficult. However, business magazines can provide the titles of individuals who receive their publication and the type of industry in which they work.
    Use of this slideThis ad can be used to discuss sources of information and audience research for magazine media buyers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to the material on pp. 405-406.
    Summary Overview
    Magazine rates are primarily a function of circulation. Other variables include the size of the ad, its position in the publication, the particular editions (geographic, demographic) chosen, and special mechanical or production requirements, and the number and frequency of insertions.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to begin a discussion on the cost elements and options available to advertisers when purchasing magazine advertising space.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to the material on p. 406 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Magazine networks offer the advertiser the opportunity to buy space in a group of publications as a package deal. The publisher usually has a variety of magazines that can reach audiences with similar characteristics, as shown on this slide. Networks can also be publishers of a group of magazines with diversified audiences, or independent networks that sell space in groups of magazines published by different companies.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to begin a discussion on buying advertising space in a group of publications as a package deal.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 406-409 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows a list of issues and trends that are affecting the future of the magazine industry, including:
    Declining ad revenues – due to economic problems and declining readership
    Stronger editorial platforms – these type of magazines appeal to interests, lifestyles, and changing demographics and have attracted readers and advertisers
    Circulation management – important to increase or maintain circulation
    Cross-magazine and media deals – two or more publishers/media offering their magazine’s ad space as one package
    Database marketing – more segmentation and niche strategies are available
    Advances in technologies – allowing for personalized messages to tightly targeted audiences
    Electronic delivery – publications available online
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss trends and developments affecting the magazine industry. Many of these issues relate to making magazine advertising more appealing to marketers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 409 of the text, and IMC Perspective 12-3, found on p. 410.
    Summary Overview
    Teenage girls and young women are one of the fastest-growing market segments in America, but they are becoming difficult to reach, particularly through print. They spend a lot more time listening to the radio or their iPods, watching TV, surfing the Internet, and chatting online than they do reading magazines.
    To capture this elusive audience, magazines such as Teen People, ElleGirl, and Teen Vogue now offer online versions of their publications.
    Conde Nast Publications, which owns Teen Vogue, Vogue, Glamour, Self, and Allure, recently launched a social Web site called flip.com. The site allows visitors to make “flip books,” which are multimedia scrapbooks of photographs, homemade music videos, and other postings.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to explain how magazines are migrating to the Internet in order to recapture lost audiences, particularly young women and girls.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 409.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows various characteristics of daily newspapers, which are the second major form of print media used by advertisers. As the slide shows, newspapers are the dominant advertising vehicle as they account for 18% of advertising revenue. There are nearly 1,500 daily newspapers in print and they are read by 54% of the adult population. Newspapers are also the main medium for most communities and most advertising dollars in papers is spent by local advertisers.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to introduce newspapers and discuss the important role they play as an advertising medium.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 409-412 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows the various classifications that can be used for newspapers. The classifications include:
    Publication frequency
    Daily – found in cities and larger towns, many of which have more than one. Daily newspapers are read by over 50% of adults each weekday, by 63% on Sundays, and can be further divided into morning, evening, or Sunday.
    Weekly – they originate in small towns or suburbs and focus on events relevant to the local area. There are 6,700 weekly newspapers in the U.S., with an average circulation of 7,500. They appeal primarily to local advertisers.
    Type
    National – have a national circulation, such as USA Today and The Christian Science Monitor. Competitive Media Reporting specifies that national newspapers are published at least five times per week, with no more than 67% of its distribution in any one area. More than 33% of the display ads must come from national advertising categories; more than 50% of total advertising must come from national advertisers.
    Special-audience – published for particular groups, such as labor unions, professional organizations, industries, and religious groups
    Supplements – magazine type supplements that appear in the newspaper, such as Parade or USA Weekend
    Use of slide
    This slide can be used to discuss various types and classification of newspapers as an advertising medium.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 412 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows the various types of newspaper advertising. The ads appearing in newspapers can be classified into these categories:
    Display ads – found throughout the newspaper, can be local or national
    Classified ads – ads arranged under subheads according to the product, service, or offering advertised
    Public notices – special ads regarding legal notices, organizations, etc.
    Printed inserts – they are printed by the advertiser and taken to the newspaper to be inserted before delivery
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show the various types of newspaper advertising and the ways newspapers are used by various advertisers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 411 of the text and Exhibit 12-18.
    Summary Overview
    Preprinted inserts can be an effective way for advertisers to reach readers of newspapers and to target their ads to specific markets in large metropolitan areas.
    This slide shows an example of a large metropolitan newspaper, the San Diego Union Tribune, promoting its special insert services to advertisers. Many retailers use inserts such as circulars, catalogs, or brochures to shoppers in their particular trade areas. This collateral piece promotes how these inserts can be targeted to specific zip codes.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to highlight the special insert services offered by many newspapers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 414-415 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of newspapers as an advertising medium.
    Advantages
    Extensive penetration – high degree of market coverage
    Flexibility – quick turnaround of running and producing the ads
    Geographic selectivity – nationally and locally
    Involvement, acceptance – consumers rely on newspapers for news, information, entertainment, and assistance in purchase decisions
    Services offered – copy writing, merchandising, market studies
    Disadvantages
    Poor reproduction quality – impacts the visual appeal of certain products (food, clothes)
    Short life span – readership lasts less than a day
    Lack of selectivity – newspapers reach broad consumer groups; it is difficult to target specific types of customers
    Clutter – on average, 64% of a paper is devoted to advertising
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the advantages and disadvantages of newspapers.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 415 and Exhibit 12-22 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide shows an example of an island ad. Island ads are surrounded by editorial material or stock market quotes and are a good way to get noticed and break through clutter.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to show an example of a creative technique know as an island ad.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 415-416 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Newspaper circulation figures fall into three categories:
    The city zone… a market area composed of the city where the paper is published and contiguous areas similar in character to the city
    The retail trading zone… the market outside the city zone whose residents regularly trade with merchants within the city zone
    The “all other” category… covers all circulation not included in the city or retail trade zone.
    Both local and national advertisers consider the circulation patterns across the various categories when evaluating and selecting newspapers.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to discuss the categories into which circulation figures are broken, and why this might be important to media buyers who want to penetrate a particular market or trade area.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 417 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Newspapers have different rate structures for general or national advertisers versus local or retail advertisers. General advertising rates apply to advertisers outside the newspaper’s designated market area (DMA) and to any classification deemed by the publisher to be “general” in nature. Retail or local advertising rates apply to advertisers that conduct business or sell goods or services with the DMA.
    The rates paid by general advertisers are about 75% higher than those paid by local advertisers. Newspapers argue that the rates are justified because:
    They must pay a commission to the ad agencies and independent sales reps who solicit nonlocal advertising
    The ads are not placed on a regular basis
    Raising or lowering the rates has not effect on the volume of these ads
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to point out the different in ad rate classifications and why newspapers feel they are justified in charging more for general ads.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 412 and Exhibit 12-23 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    The Newspaper National Network targets national advertisers in six low-use categories: automotive, cosmetics and toiletries, good, household products, liquor and beverages, and drugs and remedies. The network’s goal is to attract more advertising dollars from national advertisers in these categories by promoting the strategic use of newspapers and facilitating the purchase of newspaper space with the one order/one bill model.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to point out that, regardless of how advertisers may complain about advertising rates, newspapers are still the best place to promote products and services.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on p. 418 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    Newspapers use columns of varying width. Some have six columns per page, while others have eight or nine. This results in a complicated production and buying process for national advertisers that purchase space in a number of newspapers.
    To address this problem, the newspaper industry switched to standard advertising units (SAUs) in 1984. All newspapers under this system use 2 1/16-inch wide columns, and regardless of how many there are, and ads are sold using a column-inch unit of measure. This allows national advertisers to prepare one ad and know that it will fit in every newspaper.
    Newspaper rates for local advertisers continue to be based on the column inch, which is 1 inch deep by 1 column wide. Column widths vary, depending on the page size of the newspaper and the number of columns into which it is divided.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to explain how newspapers measure and sell ad space.
  • Relation to text
    This slide relates to material on pp. 417-418 of the text.
    Summary Overview
    This slide summarizes the number of options and pricing structures available when purchasing newspaper space. Some of the rates offered include national, flat, open, combination, color, preferred position, split runs, run-of-paper and others.
    Use of this slide
    This slide can be used to discuss the various options for purchasing newspaper ad space. The cost of advertising ad space depends not only on the newspaper’s circulation but also on factors such as premium charges for color or special sections. The purchase process and rates paid for newspaper space differ for general and local advertisers.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to material on pp. 418-421 of the text.
    Summary OverviewThis slide shows the major problems and issues newspapers must address in order to remain a dominant local advertising medium and to gain more national advertising:
    Competition from other media: Many newspapers will have to gear up to compete as direct marketers as well as respond to online sites for classified ads
    Declining circulation: Many newspapers are responding to this issue by emphasizing readership measures and developing online versions of their papers
    Cross-media opportunities: Newspapers are banding together to offer national advertisers a package of newspapers so they don’t have to purchase space in individual papers
    Attracting and retaining readers: Newspaper readership has been steadily declining for the past two decades. Many newspapers are redesigning their layouts, introducing new sections, and revising old ones to appeal to important market segments, such as women and young adults.
    Online delivery: the growth of the Internet and online services may erode print version newspaper readership, especially as the public becomes more comfortable with the idea of using the Internet to read books, magazines, and newspapers.
    Use of this slideUse this slide to discuss the problems and opportunities newspapers must face if they are to remain a dominant media.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to material on pp. 418-421 of the text and Exhibit 12-25.
    Summary Overview
    Some newspapers offer free classified ads as a way to attract and retain readers.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to illustrate one of the tactics newspapers are using to attract and retain readers.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to material on pp. 418-421 of the text and Exhibit 12-26.
    Summary Overview
    This ad is part of a campaign encouraging young people to read newspapers.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to illustrate one of the tactics newspapers are using to attract and retain young readers.
  • Relation to textThis slide relates to material on p. 421 of the text and Exhibit 12-27.
    Summary Overview
    Most daily newspapers now offer online versions of their newspapers, thus capturing readers who prefer to get their news from Web sites. The San Diego Union Tribune also promotes its online editions to advertisers.
    Use of this slide
    Use this slide to illustrate one of the tactics newspapers are using to capture online readers and advertisers.
  • Chapter12a

    1. 1. Evaluation of Print Media
    2. 2. Learning Objectives • To examine the structure of the magazine and newspaper industries and the role of each medium in the advertising program. • To examine the advantages and limitations of magazines and newspapers as advertising media. • To examine the various types of magazines and newspapers and the value of each as an advertising medium.
    3. 3. The Role of Magazines and Newspapers Reader sets the pace Not intrusive Selective audience Highinvolvement High readership
    4. 4. Magazine Target Markets
    5. 5. Classifications of Magazines Consumer Consumer Farm Farm Business Business
    6. 6. Consumer Magazines Target Specific Interests
    7. 7. Top Magazines
    8. 8. • Amongst English daily, Times of India tops the Indian Readership Survey for 2011-Q2 with a readership of 74.71 lakh, followed by Hindustan Times (37.37 lakh), The Hindu (20.77 lakh), The Telegraph (12.09 lakh) and Deccan Chronicle (10.88 lakh) forming Top 5 list of English dailies of the country. • Identify Top 10 List of English Dailies
    9. 9. Example of a Farm Publication
    10. 10. Publications ASSIGNMENT Classify Magazines in Indian context
    11. 11. Using College Magazines to Reach Students
    12. 12. Advantages of Magazines Selectivity Selectivity Reproduction Quality Reproduction Quality Creative Flexibility Creative Flexibility Permanence Permanence Prestige Prestige Receptivity, Engagement Receptivity, Engagement Services Services
    13. 13. City Magazines Provide Geographic Targeting
    14. 14. Media Kits and Rate Cards
    15. 15. Creative Flexibility Bleed Pages Bleed Pages Creative Creative Space Space Inserts Inserts Gatefolds Gatefolds Pop-Ups Pop-Ups Cover Cover Positions Positions
    16. 16. Smaller Ads Can Extend a Media Budget
    17. 17. Magazines Magazines are a more focused, albeit more expensive, alternative to newspaper advertising. This medium allows you to
    18. 18. Disadvantages of Magazines Costs Costs Limited Reach Limited Reach Limited Frequency Limited Frequency Long Lead Time Long Lead Time Clutter Clutter Competition Competition
    19. 19. Magazine Circulation Primary Primary Circulation Circulation Total Total Audience Audience Guaranteed Guaranteed Circulation Circulation Controlled Controlled Circulation Circulation Circulation Circulation Verification Verification Pass-Along Pass-Along Readership Readership
    20. 20. Readership and Total Audience Readers per copy X circulation = Total Audience
    21. 21. Media Research Guides Advertisers SRDS Media Data SRDS Media Data Reader Data Reader Data from Magazines from Magazines Ad rates and Ad rates and circulation figures circulation figures Demographics Demographics General requirements General requirements Financial profile Financial profile Contact & Web site Contact & Web site information information Lifestyle information Lifestyle information Media kits Media kits Audit statements Audit statements Product usage Product usage characteristics characteristics
    22. 22. Cost Elements of Advertising Space Circulation Circulation Size of the ad Size of the ad Position in the publication Position in the publication Editions chosen Editions chosen Production requirements Production requirements Insertion number/frequency Insertion number/frequency Use of color Use of color
    23. 23. Magazine Costs and Networks Advertising Advertising $$$ $$$ Time Time News News Network Network Newsweek Newsweek U.S. News & World Report U.S. News & World Report
    24. 24. The Future for Magazines Declining ad revenues Declining ad revenues Stronger editorial platforms Stronger editorial platforms Better circulation mgmt Better circulation mgmt Cross-Mag & media deals Cross-Mag & media deals Database marketing Database marketing Trends Technological advances Technological advances Online delivery methods Online delivery methods
    25. 25. Magazines Move Online
    26. 26. Characteristics of Newspapers The dominant advertising vehicle The dominant advertising vehicle Accounts for 18% of ad dollars Accounts for 18% of ad dollars About 1,500 daily papers in print About 1,500 daily papers in print Dailys read by 54% of adults Dailys read by 54% of adults Main community medium Main community medium
    27. 27. Types of Newspapers Daily Daily National National Special-audience Special-audience Weekly Weekly Supplements Supplements
    28. 28. Types of Newspaper Advertising Local (mostly retail) Local (mostly retail) Display Ads Display Ads National or general National or general Small items arranged by topic Small items arranged by topic Classified Ads Classified Ads Rates based on size, duration Rates based on size, duration Legal notices - public reports Legal notices - public reports Public Notices Public Notices Notices by people, organizations Notices by people, organizations Political ads Political ads Printed Printed Inserts Inserts Prepared separately by advertisers Prepared separately by advertisers
    29. 29. Parade is a Popular Sunday Supplement
    30. 30. Newspaper Advantages and Limitations Advantages Disadvantages Extensive penetration Extensive penetration Low production quality Low production quality Flexibility Flexibility Geographic selectivity Geographic selectivity Involvement, acceptance Involvement, acceptance Services offered Services offered Short life span Short life span Lack of selectivity Lack of selectivity Clutter Clutter Limited use of color Limited use of color
    31. 31. Newspapers Newspapers are one of the traditional mediums used by businesses, both big and small alike, to advertise their businesses.
    32. 32. Disadvantages Ad space can be expensive  Your ad has to compete against the clutter of other advertisers, including the giants ads run by supermarkets and department stores as well as 
    33. 33. Island Ads Break Through Clutter
    34. 34. Newspaper Circulation Figures Other Zone Other Zone City Zone Other Zone Retail Trading Zone
    35. 35. Purchasing Newspaper Space • General rates – Advertisers are outside the newspaper’s designated market area – Includes national advertisers – Are up to 75% higher than local rates • Retail or local rates – Advertisers conduct business within the designated market
    36. 36. The Newspaper National Network
    37. 37. Newspaper Advertising Rates Standard Advertising Units Sales by Column Inch One inch by One inch by 2 1/16 inches wide 2 1/16 inches wide 1 inch deep by 1 inch deep by 1 column width 1 column width Fits in all newspapers Fits in all newspapers that use this format size that use this format size Column widths vary Column widths vary Simplifies rate quotes Simplifies rate quotes Column width affects ad Column width affects ad size, shape, cost size, shape, cost Simplifies production Simplifies production process process Complicated purchasing Complicated purchasing and placement process and placement process
    38. 38. Rate Structures and Terminology General rates Split Run Rates Combination Rates Run-of-Paper [ROP] Open Rates Local Rates Flat Rates Preferred Position National Rates Color Rates
    39. 39. The Future of Newspapers Competition Competition from other from other media media Declining Declining circulation circulation Problems Problems and issues and issues Attracting and Attracting and retaining retaining readers readers Online Online delivery delivery Cross-media Cross-media opportunities opportunities
    40. 40. Attracting and Retaining Readers
    41. 41. Attracting and Retaining Readers
    42. 42. Attracting and Retaining Readers

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