Course & Workshop Conflict Management

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A workshop for new and middle-management leaders.

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Course & Workshop Conflict Management

  1. 1. Conflict ManagementCourse & Workshop<br />Rio de Janeiro<br />November 25 & 26, 2009<br />
  2. 2. Conflict management principles<br />November 2009<br />2<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  3. 3. Why Study Conflict and Conflict Management?<br />November 2009<br />3<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  4. 4. Five Myths about Conflict<br />Conflict represents communication breakdown <br />If avoided, conflict will eventually go away<br />All conflicts can be resolved<br />Conflict always results in a winner and a loser<br />Conflict is dysfunctional in the workplace <br />November 2009<br />4<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  5. 5. The central question in Conflict Management <br />“How can we avoid conflict’s potential for destruction and turn it into an agent of change and growth?”<br />November 2009<br />5<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  6. 6. Power models<br />November 2009<br />6<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  7. 7. Leadership & Power<br />November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />7<br />
  8. 8. November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />8<br />
  9. 9. Positional Authority<br />However, the impact of such influence has been eroded with changes in generational attitudes. <br />Effective leaders therefore expand their power-base beyond the limits of positional authority.<br />November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />9<br />
  10. 10. Shapes attitudes and behaviors. <br />Financial rewards to shape behavior organizations HR  <br />The use of positive rewards to encourage desired behaviors<br />The power of a personalized<br />Thank you!<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />10<br />November 2009<br />
  11. 11. Power stemming from Expertise <br />People will put more weight on your words when they believe you know what you are talking about. <br />First level leaders typically have significant expertise power. <br />November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />11<br />
  12. 12. Power stemming from Expertise <br />As your leadership career progresses you will find yourself leading people whose functional expertise is different and superior to yours. <br />Expertise will not be sufficient on its own, however you can continue build your expertise power base by:<br />November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />12<br />
  13. 13. With younger generations placing more value on loyalty to relationships than they do on loyalty to organizations, the importance of relational power is sure to increase.<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />November 2009<br />13<br />
  14. 14. Identifying hidden sources of conflict<br />November 2009<br />14<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  15. 15. The Nature of Conflict<br />November 2009<br />15<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br /><ul><li>Levels of Conflict
  16. 16. Forms of Conflict
  17. 17. Parts of a conflict
  18. 18. Types of Conflict
  19. 19. Process of Conflict
  20. 20. Mapping</li></li></ul><li>LEVELS OF CONFLICT<br />November 2009<br />16<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  21. 21. FORMS OF CONFLICT<br />November 2009<br />17<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  22. 22. PARTS OF A CONFLICT <br />Complicating factors <br />Extra issues and problems that occur as the conflict goes on, which makes dealing with the core conflict more difficult<br />Core <br />Involves the basic things that the conflict is about: incompatible interests, unmet needs, fundamental value differences<br />November 2009<br />18<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  23. 23. Cognition and Personalization<br />Positive Emotions<br />Negative Emotions<br />Perceived ConflictAwareness by one or more parties of the existence of conditions that create opportunities for conflict to arise.<br />Felt ConflictEmotional involvement in a conflict creating anxiety, tenseness, frustration, or hostility.<br />Conflict Definition<br />November 2009<br />19<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  24. 24. MAPPING <br />Issue:<br />Precipitating events<br />Historical context<br />For each party:<br />Who<br />Needs<br />Concerns<br />Facts, values, interests<br />Power<br />Goals<br />Tactics<br />November 2009<br />20<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Succinctly defines the issue, the problem area or conflict in neutral terms that all would agree on and that don’t invite a yes or no answer. <br />
  25. 25. Looking for the cause? or …looking for the culprit?<br />November 2009<br />21<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  26. 26. emotion<br />Action<br />event<br />EMOTIONS<br />Are sudden changes in our personal balance which, as a consequence of an event, predispose us to a certain action. <br />November 2009<br />22<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  27. 27. Emotions – How they affect us…<br />Emotions …<br /><ul><li>predispose us to action.
  28. 28. affect performance.
  29. 29. contribute to define what is possible or impossible for us.
  30. 30. are ingrained in human behavior: we are always within some emotional frame.</li></ul>November 2009<br />23<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  31. 31. Intentions<br />Decisions to act in a given way.<br />Cooperativeness:<br /><ul><li>Attempting to satisfy the other party’s concerns.</li></ul>Assertiveness:<br /><ul><li>Attempting to satisfy one’s own concerns.</li></ul>November 2009<br />24<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  32. 32. Dimensions of Conflict-Handling Intentions<br />Substantive Conflict<br />Affective Conflict<br />Source: K. Thomas, “Conflict and Negotiation Processes in Organizations,” in M.D. Dunnette and L.M. Hough (eds.), Handbook of Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 2nd ed., vol. 3 (Palo Alto, CA: Consulting Psychologists Press, 1992), p. 668. With permission.<br />November 2009<br />25<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  33. 33. AVOIDING <br />Effective when the conflict is temporary<br />The risk of engaging is too high<br />Avoidance does not solve the problem<br />May make the situation worse as time goes on<br />November 2009<br />26<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  34. 34. ACCOMMODATING<br />Effective when the conflict is temporary<br />A way of maintaining harmony by maintaining cohesiveness<br />Sacrificing one’s values or principles<br />You may lose the respect of others.<br />November 2009<br />27<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  35. 35. COMPETING<br />Best (or only) way to reach goals by overruling others<br />Often disregards the concerns of adversaries completely<br />Positional authority method of choice <br />November 2009<br />28<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  36. 36. COMPROMISING<br />Compromising gives up more than competing but less than accommodating<br />Compromising requires cooperation and might mean exchanging concessions<br />November 2009<br />29<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  37. 37. COLLABORATING<br />Requires cooperation and might mean exchanging concessions<br /> Increases commitment to working together to resolve conflicts. <br />To meet one’s own needs and those of others as well<br />November 2009<br />30<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  38. 38. Summarizing… Effective Conflict Management involves<br />Substantive Conflict<br />Moderate amount of substantive conflict<br />Minimizing amount of affective conflict<br />Selecting & using any of the 5 conflict handling intentions depending on each evolving situation<br />Affective Conflict<br />November 2009<br />31<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  39. 39. Behavioral Response<br />Substantive Conflict<br />Conflict Management<br />The use of resolution and stimulation techniques to achieve the desired level of conflict.<br />Affective Conflict<br />November 2009<br />32<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  40. 40. Conflict Stimulation Techniques<br /><ul><li>Problem solving
  41. 41. Superordinate goals
  42. 42. Authoritative command
  43. 43. Altering the human variable
  44. 44. Altering the structural variables
  45. 45. Changing communication paradigms</li></ul>Source: Based on S. P. Robbins, Managing Organizational Conflict: A Nontraditional Approach (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1974), pp. 59–89<br />November 2009<br />33<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  46. 46. November 2009<br />34<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Outcomes<br />
  47. 47. Outcomes (Cont’d)<br />November 2009<br />35<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />overcomes group’s goals<br />Dysfunctional Outcomes<br />
  48. 48. Emotional self-control<br />November 2009<br />36<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  49. 49. EMOTIONS…<br />November 2009<br />37<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br /><ul><li> are contagious,
  50. 50. flow, and change.
  51. 51. are associated with a particular time and place.
  52. 52. We all have an emotional repertoire which we have learned.
  53. 53. We can become better observers of the emotions we have.</li></li></ul><li>EMOTIONAL PHASES<br />EVENT<br />November 2009<br />38<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  54. 54. MANAGING EMOTIONS<br /><ul><li>Know your emotions
  55. 55. Manage your emotional response
  56. 56. Self -motivate
  57. 57. Recognize emotions in others
  58. 58. Manage relationships</li></ul>PERSONAL SKILLS<br />SOCIAL SKILLS<br />November 2009<br />39<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Adapted from Daniel Goleman, Emotional Intelligence<br />
  59. 59. Mediation and negotiations: strategies for agreement<br />November 2009<br />40<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  60. 60. November 2009<br />41<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  61. 61. WIN-WIN APPROACH<br />November 2009<br />42<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Changing the conflict from <br />Powerful shift of attitude that alters the whole course of communication<br />Partners rather than opponents<br />Mediation rather than broken relationships<br />adversarial attack & defense <br />Cooperation<br />to<br />
  62. 62. Third-Party Negotiations<br />Mediated<br />A mediator is a neutral third party who facilitates a negotiated solution by using reasoning, persuasion, and suggestions for alternatives.<br />Arbitrated<br />An arbitratoracts as a third party to a negotiation and has the authority to dictate an agreement.<br />November 2009<br />43<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  63. 63. Facilitated Negotiations<br />Suspicion and/or personality clashes have developed<br />Communication between parties has broken down or an impasse has been reached<br />Tensions, emotions, or transaction costs running high <br />No single right solution that is required and unalterable<br />Parties want or need to maintain some ongoing relationship <br />November 2009<br />44<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  64. 64. Skills for Conflict Management<br />November 2009<br />45<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />CREATIVE RESPONSE <br />EMPATHY<br />APPROPRIATE ASSERTIVENESS<br />MANAGING EMOTIONS<br />SELF-KNOWLEDGE<br />RESPECTING OTHERS<br />
  65. 65. CREATIVE RESPONSE<br />November 2009<br />46<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Turning problems into possibilities.<br />What can be done, rather than saying “how terrible this is”!<br />Choose to extract the best from the situation.<br />
  66. 66. APPROPRIATE ASSERTIVENESS<br />Awareness of self<br />Being able to state your case without arousing the defenses of the other person <br />It’s not about being polite, but it does not hurt <br />November 2009<br />47<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />Blah, Blah<br />Blah, Blah…<br />Really??!! PROVE IT!<br />Sounds good, but how can we do it?<br />
  67. 67. EMPATHY<br />Awareness of others<br />Empathy is about rapport and openness between people.<br />Best way to build empathy is to help other person feel understood<br />November 2009<br />48<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  68. 68. MANAGING EMOTIONS<br />November 2009<br />49<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br /><ul><li>Handling yourself
  69. 69. Don’t indulge
  70. 70. Don’t deny
  71. 71. Create richer relationships</li></li></ul><li>SELF-KNOWLEDGE <br />Does the situation inform or inflame?<br />What shocks you, checks you!<br />November 2009<br />50<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  72. 72. RESPECTING OTHERS<br />Respect and value differences<br />Each person’s viewpoint makes a contribution to the whole and requires consideration and respect in order to form a complete solution. <br />November 2009<br />51<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />
  73. 73. Questions?<br /> You may get more information about this and other workshops <br />Please write to <br />gviller@gmail.com<br /> THANK YOU<br />November 2009<br />Designed and facilitated by Georgette Viller, MEdT<br />52<br />

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