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Making Learning Visible: Documentation and Reflection Tsivia Cohen Chicago Children’s Museum Exhibit and Research sponsore...
Documentation <ul><li>Physical evidence or record of an experience </li></ul><ul><li>Photographs, oral recording, video, t...
Reflection <ul><li>Constructing meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Interview </li></ul><ul><li>Expla...
Foundations  <ul><li>Reggio Emilia </li></ul><ul><li>Constructivist educational theory </li></ul><ul><li>Social learning t...
Construction Exhibit Design: Gyroscope Fabrication: Redbox
Skyscraper Challenge photo-narrative experience Combines hands-on activity with computer program Family (adult-child) comp...
Building Permit <ul><li>Identifies family </li></ul><ul><li>Allows access </li></ul>
Hi there, kids--and adults, too. Welcome to the Skyscraper Challenge. Here’s a chance to see yourselves at work and think ...
Goal: Build a Skyscraper (can be changed) Time Limit: 12 minutes plus 3
Select 6 out of 10 pictures
Narrative Reflection
Default Prompts <ul><li>I’m curious about this first picture; how did you figure out how to start building? </li></ul><ul>...
How did you figure out how to start building? <ul><li>C5: We put two ones that can’t stand up and then we put black ones a...
Grown ups, this question is for you. How did your team try to solve these problems? <ul><li>M: Well, we talked about them....
Book Graphic <ul><li>Chosen title </li></ul><ul><li>“ The authors are” </li></ul><ul><li>Pictures in chronological order  ...
Findings Prototype: What do caregivers see? (Cohen & Arsenault, 2007) Pilot: Does the narrative experience increase or cha...
<ul><li>Caregiver role is critical. </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of 23 narratives during prototyping </li></ul><ul><li>What ...
In 74% of families, caregivers mentioned STEM content Solving  stability  problem (52%) Acquiring/using  tool  or hardware...
In 87% of families, caregivers talked about the need to collaborate: <ul><li>Emphasizing the importance of teamwork </li><...
In 91% of families, adults reported problem solving when asked.   <ul><li>Caregiver-directed question:  How did your team ...
Connected engineering content to problem solving: 71% <ul><li>M: We had to think about the structure and the strength of t...
3. How did caregiver see their role? Negotiating turn taking Managing frustration Encouraging team work <ul><ul><li>F: We ...
B. Helping the team talk (17%) <ul><li>Mother: We just talked about it while were were working on it.  There was a lot of ...
Sharing Expertise (21%) <ul><li>F: …I was trying to let them solve it for themselves… I just gave suggestions every once i...
Implications <ul><li>Component successful in helping adults reflect about STEM content and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Car...
Suzanne Gaskin’s students: Karie Pappa, Brenda Roman, Peter Sullivan, Stephanie Wishnoff Northeastern Illinois University,...
Comparision of Two Groups <ul><li>Interviewed 40 caregivers who had participated in the large scale building activity (20)...
Interview Questions <ul><li>Is this your first time coming to the museum?  If no, about how many times did you come in the...
Photo-narrative didn’t increase adults’ spontaneous mention of learning. .
Increase  in  mention of learning process but decrease in mention of learning content.
<ul><li>Increased awareness of scaffolding as an adult role in learning. </li></ul>
Implications <ul><ul><li>Adult visitors in both settings are aware of learning when asked. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What...
Randi Korn and Associates Stephanie Downey, Lead Evaluation: What are families talking about in their narratives?   Prelim...
More than half included STEM Language <ul><li>You always have to build a foundation and from a foundation, you are going t...
We’re Still Learning <ul><li>What happens after they leave? </li></ul><ul><li>What is impact on children’s learning? </li>...
With a song in your head: <ul><li>Experi ence is never quite enough! </li></ul><ul><li>Experi ence -- Never enough! </li><...
About Learning <ul><li>We (learned) that if we work together we can make a really great building. </li></ul><ul><li>(We) l...
About Problems How to make a stable structure: 33% How to use materials or pick right pieces: 33% Not having  enough time ...
 
 
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Cohen_Making_Learning_Visible_ASTC_08

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This presentation was given by Tsivia Cohen at the 2008 ASTC Annual conference. It was part of the Digging Deeper session chaired by Sue Allen. Copyright 2008 Chicago Children's Museum

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Cohen_Making_Learning_Visible_ASTC_08

  1. 1. Making Learning Visible: Documentation and Reflection Tsivia Cohen Chicago Children’s Museum Exhibit and Research sponsored by NSF
  2. 2. Documentation <ul><li>Physical evidence or record of an experience </li></ul><ul><li>Photographs, oral recording, video, the product itself </li></ul><ul><li>Measurement </li></ul>
  3. 3. Reflection <ul><li>Constructing meaning </li></ul><ul><li>Conversation </li></ul><ul><li>Interview </li></ul><ul><li>Explanation </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative </li></ul>: Language is how experience becomes knowledge.—Ash, Nelson, Haden…
  4. 4. Foundations <ul><li>Reggio Emilia </li></ul><ul><li>Constructivist educational theory </li></ul><ul><li>Social learning theory--Vygotsky, Bruner </li></ul><ul><li>Strategies to increase engagement and interaction (Borun, Humphrey, Gutwill, Allen) </li></ul><ul><li>Narrative and conversation as meaning making (Crowley, Haden, Ash, Callahan) </li></ul><ul><li>Personal and interpersonal nature of informal learning (Falk, Dierking, …) </li></ul><ul><li>Memories encoding (Anderson, Haden…) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Construction Exhibit Design: Gyroscope Fabrication: Redbox
  6. 6. Skyscraper Challenge photo-narrative experience Combines hands-on activity with computer program Family (adult-child) component Multi-Step Experience Program: Marc Bjorkland
  7. 7. Building Permit <ul><li>Identifies family </li></ul><ul><li>Allows access </li></ul>
  8. 8. Hi there, kids--and adults, too. Welcome to the Skyscraper Challenge. Here’s a chance to see yourselves at work and think about how you solve problems together. First, your team’s going to build, while I take pictures of you. Then you can use those pictures to tell me the story of your building.
  9. 9. Goal: Build a Skyscraper (can be changed) Time Limit: 12 minutes plus 3
  10. 10. Select 6 out of 10 pictures
  11. 11. Narrative Reflection
  12. 12. Default Prompts <ul><li>I’m curious about this first picture; how did you figure out how to start building? </li></ul><ul><li>What was each of you thinking as you built? </li></ul><ul><li>What problems did you have as you built? </li></ul><ul><li>Grown-ups, this question is for you. How did your team try to solve these problems? </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone, talk about your building. What did you each learn from building it? </li></ul><ul><li>Great job of building together and telling your story. What do you think you’ll remember from doing this? </li></ul>(can be changed)
  13. 13. How did you figure out how to start building? <ul><li>C5: We put two ones that can’t stand up and then we put black ones across…for the foundation and then we started building up to the clouds. And we built it. It tipped. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Grown ups, this question is for you. How did your team try to solve these problems? <ul><li>M: Well, we talked about them. And we were saying how are building was tipping. And how could we make it so it’s stronger? </li></ul><ul><li>B5: Yeah. </li></ul><ul><li>M: And M realized the foundation needed to be stronger. And we connect the top pieces together, so it didn’t tilt over. So, it was mainly talking together as we worked. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Book Graphic <ul><li>Chosen title </li></ul><ul><li>“ The authors are” </li></ul><ul><li>Pictures in chronological order </li></ul><ul><li>Hear their words </li></ul><ul><li>Accessible on Web </li></ul><ul><li>Printable </li></ul>
  16. 16. Findings Prototype: What do caregivers see? (Cohen & Arsenault, 2007) Pilot: Does the narrative experience increase or change what caregivers see? (Gaskins, NEIU Students, 2008) Evaluation: What are families talking about in their narratives? (Randi Korn, 2008)
  17. 17. <ul><li>Caregiver role is critical. </li></ul><ul><li>Analysis of 23 narratives during prototyping </li></ul><ul><li>What content and processes do they describe? </li></ul><ul><li>How do they see their role? </li></ul>What do Caregivers See?
  18. 18. In 74% of families, caregivers mentioned STEM content Solving stability problem (52%) Acquiring/using tool or hardware related skills (39%) Both (17%) STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math
  19. 19. In 87% of families, caregivers talked about the need to collaborate: <ul><li>Emphasizing the importance of teamwork </li></ul><ul><li>Describing working together </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting problems with teamwork (1) </li></ul>Awareness of Process
  20. 20. In 91% of families, adults reported problem solving when asked. <ul><li>Caregiver-directed question: How did your team try to solve these problems? </li></ul><ul><li>M: We did trial and error, didn’t we? We tried what worked….We tried what worked and saw what didn’t. </li></ul><ul><li>(b5,3) </li></ul>
  21. 21. Connected engineering content to problem solving: 71% <ul><li>M: We had to think about the structure and the strength of the object we were building. And we had to make sure that it had the right support for the people living in it. It won’t fall down. </li></ul>
  22. 22. 3. How did caregiver see their role? Negotiating turn taking Managing frustration Encouraging team work <ul><ul><li>F: We just kept working as a team… trying to make the tower go higher and higher. </li></ul></ul>A. Pitching In (57%) B. Managing Behavior (12%)
  23. 23. B. Helping the team talk (17%) <ul><li>Mother: We just talked about it while were were working on it. There was a lot of nuts involved, so we had time to discuss it while we were doing that. (g8) </li></ul>
  24. 24. Sharing Expertise (21%) <ul><li>F: …I was trying to let them solve it for themselves… I just gave suggestions every once in a while. (b7,12) </li></ul>F: Well, I would start the bolt and let my son finish it out by turning it.
  25. 25. Implications <ul><li>Component successful in helping adults reflect about STEM content and learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Caregivers recognize STEM content, processes, and collaboration. </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t know how or if the experience impacts this recognition. </li></ul>
  26. 26. Suzanne Gaskin’s students: Karie Pappa, Brenda Roman, Peter Sullivan, Stephanie Wishnoff Northeastern Illinois University, 2008 Does the photo-narrative experience increase or change what caregivers see?
  27. 27. Comparision of Two Groups <ul><li>Interviewed 40 caregivers who had participated in the large scale building activity (20) and the Skyscraper Challenge (20) with their family. </li></ul>
  28. 28. Interview Questions <ul><li>Is this your first time coming to the museum? If no, about how many times did you come in the last year? </li></ul><ul><li>How would you describe what goes on in a children’s museum to someone who has never seen it before? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think you and your child will get out of the visit at the museum today? </li></ul><ul><li>What do you think your child has learned in this exhibit? How were you able to tell when your child was learning something? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your part in your child’s experience? Can you describe anything in particular that you did to help them learn? </li></ul>
  29. 29. Photo-narrative didn’t increase adults’ spontaneous mention of learning. .
  30. 30. Increase in mention of learning process but decrease in mention of learning content.
  31. 31. <ul><li>Increased awareness of scaffolding as an adult role in learning. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Implications <ul><ul><li>Adult visitors in both settings are aware of learning when asked. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What about the large scale building experience is drawing attention to content? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interviews are a kind of reflective experience. </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. Randi Korn and Associates Stephanie Downey, Lead Evaluation: What are families talking about in their narratives? Preliminary Analysis of Narratives from 43 Families with Children 5-10
  34. 34. More than half included STEM Language <ul><li>You always have to build a foundation and from a foundation, you are going to build the walls, and from the walls, you build the next wall. If you do not do the foundation, the rest of falls in a heap. </li></ul><ul><li>We used cross-supports and braces along the base. </li></ul>
  35. 35. We’re Still Learning <ul><li>What happens after they leave? </li></ul><ul><li>What is impact on children’s learning? </li></ul><ul><li>What about wrong information? </li></ul><ul><li>What prompts work best? For whom? </li></ul><ul><li>Can these strategies change what people do and say DURING the experience? </li></ul><ul><li>What other interactive experiences lend themselves to these strategies ? </li></ul>
  36. 36. With a song in your head: <ul><li>Experi ence is never quite enough! </li></ul><ul><li>Experi ence -- Never enough! </li></ul><ul><li>Processing is what it’s really all about! </li></ul><ul><li>Looking back’s worth a lot! </li></ul><ul><li>Processing IS key </li></ul><ul><li>It really is. </li></ul><ul><li>It really iiiiiisssss KEY! </li></ul>
  37. 37. About Learning <ul><li>We (learned) that if we work together we can make a really great building. </li></ul><ul><li>(We) learned that is is really hard to work as a team and know what to do together. </li></ul>About a third mention teamwork.
  38. 38. About Problems How to make a stable structure: 33% How to use materials or pick right pieces: 33% Not having enough time or materials: 33% The triangle pieces wouldn’t fit. I kept putting the nuts on the wrong way. (Our building) wasn’t braced correctly so it could still wobble and move up and down. Not enough materials to complete our masterpiece.

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