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TALENT SOURCING TOP 10: FREE TOOLS & METHODS
TO SUPERCHARGE RECRUITERS' PIPELINES
GLENN GUTMACHER
N. AMERICA GROUP MGR., T...
Who Is Glenn Gutmacher?
• At Avanade since 2010, training and managing offshore sourcing team
supporting North America, an...
What’s the Agenda?
1. Beyond basic keywords to get to golden search strings
2. Natural language search (find what other re...
Concepts Beyond Keywords
• Abbreviations (Acronym Finder, etc.) & Concepts (Wikipedia, etc.)
• Thematic Search Engines: Yi...
Best Search Strings Include…
Job Titles like
 "AE" OR "Account Executive" OR …
 "Senior * Manager" OR "Sr * Manager" OR ...
Natural Language Search
• While building out lists of individual keywords (and their synonyms) is a big jump
over using ju...
Explicit & Implicit Search
• Terms Glen Cathey coined in this 2012 presentation particularly
in a LinkedIn context to find...
Other Key Terms in Title or URL
Profiles now outnumber resumes online, so also try words like:
• bio, profile, about, us, ...
Finding Relevant Communities
Many technical and other communities exist online with
plenty of info about individual talent...
Facebook
• In early 2015, Shane McCusker created an easy-to-use free web tool
to search various Facebook fields. As of now...
Twitter & GooglePlus (G+)
Twitter
• Its advanced search lets you find people in a particular location talking
about specif...
Diversity Search
These techniques are not foolproof in part because many candidates don’t promote
their diverse status. If...
Diversity Search (continued)
Diverse fraternities/sororities: Black females (e.g., Alpha Kappa Alpha),
Black males (e.g., ...
Easy Web Search in Chrome
The free Chrome extension Search Bar allows you to have a large number of
custom search engines ...
Recruiting Competitive Intelligence
While your best source for early news is recruiters who talk to candidates and
busines...
Must-have web browser extensions
Free (or free trial) tools to find more people/contact info. All are
for Chrome browser (...
Must-have free web search sites
• SourceHub – free registration; provides suggested extra keywords, transfers
your search ...
APPENDIX (stuff we didn’t
have time for, but useful!)
Diversity Search (more examples)
Use on search engines:
1. Find associations: “African American” Accountants Association, ...
Plan & Organize
• Block out activities in your calendar like:
– Making new cold calls or networking calls
– “Sourcing hour...
Manage Social inbound & outbound
• Ad hoc: Use Tweetdeck.com or Hootsuite.com – the free tier of either tool is sufficient...
Thanks for watching… ping me if questions later:
glenn@recruiting-online.com
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Bullhorn Engage 2015 sourcing presentation by Glenn Gutmacher

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an updated and slightly-abbreviated version of my Sourcer's Daily Dozen presentation seen at other industry conferences

Published in: Recruiting & HR

Bullhorn Engage 2015 sourcing presentation by Glenn Gutmacher

  1. 1. TALENT SOURCING TOP 10: FREE TOOLS & METHODS TO SUPERCHARGE RECRUITERS' PIPELINES GLENN GUTMACHER N. AMERICA GROUP MGR., TALENT SOURCING CENTER OF EXCELLENCE, AVANADE INC. & FOUNDER, RECRUITING-ONLINE.COM (glenn@recruiting-online.com)
  2. 2. Who Is Glenn Gutmacher? • At Avanade since 2010, training and managing offshore sourcing team supporting North America, and doing strategic online sourcing projects • VP of recruiter training firm Arbita Consulting & Education Services (2008-2010) • Senior Recruiting Researcher/Talent Sourcer at Microsoft (2005-2008) & Getronics (2003-2005) • Pioneering Sourcing training and methods since 1997 • Founded JobSmart in 1996, greater Boston’s 1st regional career portal (owned by a major newspaper chain) • Yale graduate • Founder of Recruiting-Online.com sourcing training Connect with his large network on LinkedIn and you can reach him on Google+, Facebook and Twitter.
  3. 3. What’s the Agenda? 1. Beyond basic keywords to get to golden search strings 2. Natural language search (find what other recruiters miss) 3. Explicit & Implicit search (ditto) 4. Diversity search (this works great on LinkedIn, too!) 5. Finding relevant communities & their members using search engine special commands (bonus: web scraping) 6. The other big networks: Facebook, Twitter, GooglePlus 7. Easy custom search 8. Competitive intelligence 9. Must-have browser extensions 10. Must-have search sites MORE BONUSES in Appendix & during Q&A as time allows!
  4. 4. Concepts Beyond Keywords • Abbreviations (Acronym Finder, etc.) & Concepts (Wikipedia, etc.) • Thematic Search Engines: Yippy (formerly Clusty) • Job Titles - search on a large job aggregator (Indeed or SimplyHired): – Under Title subheading in left-hand column, click the "more" link – Copy the whole set of job titles, then sift to the relevant ones – You can also validate job titles against LinkedIn and Jigsaw – Timesaver: copy the data into an Excel template that automatically converts the set of titles into a Boolean string for easy searching on LinkedIn, job boards, etc. • Companies: • ZoomInfo – use the free community edition, • Data.com (formerly Jigsaw; like ZoomInfo, can be outdated in terms of current company) • LinkedIn (use Company search with large lists of firms)
  5. 5. Best Search Strings Include… Job Titles like  "AE" OR "Account Executive" OR …  "Senior * Manager" OR "Sr * Manager" OR "Sr * Mgr"  ("Software Engineer" OR Programmer) Company Names like  ("Hewlett Packard" OR HP OR @hp.com)  (IBM OR @ibm.com OR @us.ibm.com) Skills, Licenses, Degrees, or Certifications like  (", RN" OR ", CNA" OR ", LPN")  (", CPA" OR ", CFA")  (", CHDA" OR "Health Data Analyst") Locations like  (Addison OR Carrollton OR Coppell OR Denton OR DFW OR Dallas OR "Flower Mound" OR "Ft. Worth" OR "Fort Worth" OR Garland OR Grapevine OR Lewisville OR Plano) ", TX"  (214 OR 430 OR 469 OR 682 OR 817 OR 903 OR 940 OR 972) ", TX"  Sydney 61 Australia
  6. 6. Natural Language Search • While building out lists of individual keywords (and their synonyms) is a big jump over using just a few terms, also remember to search the way people talk and write. • This “natural language” phrasing tends to include pronouns and action words – e.g., “I configured X,” “delivered presentations to clinical,” etc. • You will find many examples in resumes, profiles, and blogs. Make sure they are not too narrow in scope. • Use pronouns like (she OR he) to find third-person references such as articles, speeches, quoted experts, press releases, etc. • It’s fine to use the wildcard (asterisk) as word placeholders on Google to allow for more phrasing variations – e.g., "I * work|worked|working * 1..200 bed * ICU|intensive“ "I * architected|built|configure|configured|deploy|deployed|design|designed * 9000..99999 users“ Remember to click the “show omitted results” link at bottom of the Google results page!
  7. 7. Explicit & Implicit Search • Terms Glen Cathey coined in this 2012 presentation particularly in a LinkedIn context to find profiles most recruiters miss by treating it like a resume db. • You can get good results searching for keywords (LTD OR “Long Term Disability”) AND (Claim OR Claims) AND Insurance with job titles like Manager OR Supervisor • But what if you change it to (LTD OR “Long Term Disability”) AND (Claim OR Claims) NOT Insurance • Different results but still relevant! • Selectively eliminate must-have keywords to see what you get. • Also works with variants of company names (Citi, Glaxo, JPMorgan, PwC) • When results count is low, include more possibilities (e.g., laundry list of relevant companies, keyword synonyms, action words, GPA values, etc.) TIP: To find sparse profiles, search by specific LI groups, then eliminate the recruiters with Title of NOT (hr OR people OR sourcing OR recruiter OR staff ….)
  8. 8. Other Key Terms in Title or URL Profiles now outnumber resumes online, so also try words like: • bio, profile, about, us, our • team, staff, people, alumni • roster, list, directory, members, attendees, board • speakers, panel, agenda, officers, minutes • Examples: intitle:hospital (clinical OR health OR healthcare) ("data analyst" OR "financial analyst") (Texas OR ", TX") (intitle:alumni OR intitle:people OR intitle:staff OR intitle:about OR intitle:bio OR intitle:profile OR intitle:team OR intitle:our OR inurl:about OR inurl:bio OR inurl:profile OR inurl:our OR inurl:team OR inurl:alumni OR inurl:people OR inurl:staff) • himss 2015 ("Dr." OR Director) (intitle:"delegates" OR intitle:"attendees" OR intitle:"speakers" OR intitle:"members") • (inurl:directory OR inurl:staff OR inurl:team) (attorney OR counsel) (cell OR ext OR phone OR mobile) -site:gov -site:edu
  9. 9. Finding Relevant Communities Many technical and other communities exist online with plenty of info about individual talent, collected into similar- skilled buckets. Some are best searched directly within the site using its native search, e.g.: • profiles of users on Github • MeetUp (and see this article about how to source from them) • Portfolios on AIGA, Behance, Coroflot or Dribbble While others may yield better results using a search engine, e.g.: StackOverflow.com (and its technical sister sites) – try Googling: TECH TERMS: site:stackoverflow.com inurl:users intitle:user linux kernel LOCATIONS: site:stackoverflow.com inurl:users intitle:user (houston OR texas OR "tx") BONUS TIP: You can often web scrape content you find this way with tools like Outwit, Import.io, etc.) See this how-to video for more.
  10. 10. Facebook • In early 2015, Shane McCusker created an easy-to-use free web tool to search various Facebook fields. As of now, it still works with the current version of Facebook Graph Search. Only thing it lacks is searching people *near* a location, but you can add that to the result URL: find location code, change URL to end with locationcode/residents-near/present/intersect (e.g., Walmart employees near Houston Texas) • Unless they turn it off in their FB settings, you can email them based on their username (e.g., www.facebook.com/glenngutmacher --> glenngutmacher@facebook.com). • This also works when you find a FB profile with a numerical userid – e.g., for https://m.facebook.com/profile.php?id=267171200102460 you can email 267171200102460@facebook.com and it will auto- forward to their primary email as well! TIP: When joining a Facebook group, you can see all the other members.
  11. 11. Twitter & GooglePlus (G+) Twitter • Its advanced search lets you find people in a particular location talking about specific things, so it’s great when you have a unique keyword • Also leverage curated Twitter lists by others. site:twitter.com inurl:lists inurl:apple inurl:(employees | team)  https://twitter.com/jerols/apple-employees/members • Also consider a monitoring tool like TweetDeck or HootSuite (see Appendix) GooglePlus • GooglePlus has its own search, but x-ray on Google is often easier – e.g., site:plus.google.com ("cpa" OR accountant) "lived|lives * minneapolis|mn" • Use in combination with Gmail compose trick to verify home Gmail Some tools on the “Must-Have free sites” slide will also search these networks.
  12. 12. Diversity Search These techniques are not foolproof in part because many candidates don’t promote their diverse status. If your company is subject to OFCCP guidelines, consult your legal dept. re: if/how you use and document these sourcing methods. • Ethnicities: “natural phrase” keywords put in an OR clause such as (“African American” OR “Asian American” OR “Latin American”) added to a string of professional/educational associations can be effective in expanding results. • Languages: combine with natural phrases like “native Spanish,” “fluent Cantonese” or “fluent Korean.” Searching for both the words “Cantonese” and “Mandarin” is a great way to find Chinese candidates because typically only native speakers list both on a resume. This works well for other ethnicities that commonly speak multiple languages (e.g. “Hindi” and “Urdu”). Also try using the native spelling of their language as a search keyword, e.g., Español CPA Miami FL (he OR she).
  13. 13. Diversity Search (continued) Diverse fraternities/sororities: Black females (e.g., Alpha Kappa Alpha), Black males (e.g., Alpha Phi Alpha). Latinas (e.g., Kappa Delta Chi), Latinos (e.g., Omega Delta Phi), Asians (e.g., Lambda Phi Epsilon is a cross-national Asian fraternity; Beta Chi Theta focuses on South Asians). See NMGC for multicultural Greek organizations and NALFO for just Latino ones. Universities: the majority of alumni of the 114 Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are African-American, there’s a Hispanic US college association list and over 40 women’s colleges. Search through these websites using the site: command to find relevant points of contact, or use school names in resume or profile searches. Professional associations: acronyms are good keywords, such as NSHMBA (National Society of Hispanic MBAs), SHPE (Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers), NBMBAA (National Black MBA Association) or NSBE (National Society of Black Engineers), etc. TIP: Two great methods to find women candidates on LinkedIn: • keywords HER OR SHE • girls’ names in first name field
  14. 14. Easy Web Search in Chrome The free Chrome extension Search Bar allows you to have a large number of custom search engines in a toolbar format. 1.Once installed, click its magnifying glass icon in the Chrome browser top (extensions) bar to open Search Bar. 2.In the Search Bar, click the settings cogwheel at far right to open the custom search options/help page. 3.Now just run the type of site search you want to add (Bing, Google, etc.), copy the URL and note where your variable text appears. For example, the boldface portion of this: http://webmii.com/people?n="glenn%20gutmacher“ 4.On the Search Bar’s options page, click “Custom searches” in the left-hand column, then click the gray “show advanced options” button 5.Add the site name under Description, paste in the search URL but replace the variable part with %s (so the above would be http://webmii.com/people?n=“%s” (Home page, Icon and other fields are optional –can leave blank). Click gray “create new” button to save previous. 6.Type your keyword(s) in Search Bar’s text field, then click your button to run it! A more interesting example for Github members in MA: https://www.google. com/search?q=site: github.com+%22join ed+on%22+%22%s%2 2+(%22boston%22+O R+%22,+ma%22+OR+ %22Massachusetts% 22)+%22%22+- intitle:%22at+master %22+-inurl:tab+- inurl:jobs+- inurl:articles&filter=0
  15. 15. Recruiting Competitive Intelligence While your best source for early news is recruiters who talk to candidates and business people in the field, some free tools can be useful to identify companies being acquired, laying off, experiencing financial or other trigger issues: • Owler – create custom company lists and receive news via web/email • Regional sites: LinkSV (Silicon Valley people moves), ValleyWag (SV news), Bizjournals (business-focused trade publications by metro area) • Industry sites: FiercePharma, Dealbreaker (investing world), and FierceMarkets has dozens more for telecom, life sciences, IT, government, finance, marketing, retail and energy (but don’t ignore industry magazines’ websites) • Glassdoor has the interesting P.O.V. of employees’ reviews • Use Google related: command to find similar resources when you’re on a useful site (company, conference, association, etc.)
  16. 16. Must-have web browser extensions Free (or free trial) tools to find more people/contact info. All are for Chrome browser (+ others if indicated): • Broadlook Capture: spiders multiple people on page and researches info • Connectifier (Chrome, Firefox, IE) shows other social networks and contact info when viewing a profile (e.g., try with Indeed resumes) • Prophet, 360Social, Connect6, PeopleGraph are similar. • SellHack (Chrome, Firefox, Safari). Also try its free beta X-Ray search engine with contact info tool • WhoWorksAt - use when on target company’s website • HootSuite hootlet (multiple) - post any page to some/all of your social networks TIP: Similarly- functioning Chrome extensions will often overlap (e.g., right hand column) so use Extensity to turn on/off your Chrome extensions quickly.
  17. 17. Must-have free web search sites • SourceHub – free registration; provides suggested extra keywords, transfers your search easily to specific sites • Recruit’em – another easy web overlay without having to know x-ray search syntax • Search by name + location: Pipl (best free one for social networks’ data), Radaris, Zabasearch • ZoomInfo.com (its full people search Community Edition is free) and Data.com Connect (formerly Jigsaw) provides work email & phone (free if use points system) • AIRS resume search – similar to other Google CSE’s on the web (e.g., several available here). Learn more about Google CSEs. • www.uvrx.com - a well-designed public Google CSE that lets you run your search (e.g., "UI Engineer" Texas) and has tabs along the top for each social network, then clickable filters for All, Posts, Plus, (and the best) Profiles Many other paid-tool players (but may offer free trials – ask around) TIP If you have a LinkedIn Recruiter license, use the member postal code trick
  18. 18. APPENDIX (stuff we didn’t have time for, but useful!)
  19. 19. Diversity Search (more examples) Use on search engines: 1. Find associations: “African American” Accountants Association, or try (Latino OR Hispanic) Accountants Association. 2. Narrow geographically with city, state or region names, e.g. (Latino OR Hispanic) Accountants Association “New York” 3. Take the name of an organization and combine it with keywords that would reveal members, volunteers, or presenters at that group’s meetings, e.g. (“Women in Technology & Industry” OR WITI OR link:witi.com) (member OR speaker OR panelist OR presenter OR board OR officer OR president OR chapter OR staff OR volunteer) 4. Try keywords that may reveal people at a particular chapter meeting, etc. Example: (“Women in Technology & Industry” OR WITI OR link:witi.com) (roster OR list OR directory OR “meeting minutes” OR attendees OR attended OR attendance) 5. Narrow using names/abbreviations of locations, area codes, particular universities, or even employers. Or include a particular year(s) to get more recent results, e.g., (2011 OR 2012 OR 2013 OR 2014 OR 2015)
  20. 20. Plan & Organize • Block out activities in your calendar like: – Making new cold calls or networking calls – “Sourcing hour” for online research (not phone) – Returning voicemails – Replying to non-urgent email – Training time (e.g., learning a new tool) • Use Folders, Favorites, and Templates • Use a Research Form to plan sourcing • Control your Inbox with filters • Bcc: yourself on messages you want to keep, then delete your Sent items folder periodically • Use color categories to facilitate searching (applies to messages, calendar items, contacts and tasks) TIP Let RSS feeds from your favorite sites & Bing search results come into your Outlook email inbox (you don’t need a separate feed reader)
  21. 21. Manage Social inbound & outbound • Ad hoc: Use Tweetdeck.com or Hootsuite.com – the free tier of either tool is sufficient. • Drip a feed automatically: Use Dlvr.it (free for several feeds and social accounts per person)
  22. 22. Thanks for watching… ping me if questions later: glenn@recruiting-online.com

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