Gurvir27003399

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Gurvir27003399

  1. 1. Conflict Negotiation Submitted to –Adele Carson Submitted by- Gurvir Singh Student ID-27003399
  2. 2. New Zealand Wars The New Zealand Wars, sometimes called the Land Wars and also once called the Maori Wars, were a series of armed conflicts that took place in New Zealand from 1845 and 1872. While the early wars were largely localized, from 1860 to 1864 the wars were aimed to end the Maori King Movement, which refused to accept colonial authority, and acquiring farming and residential land for English settlers. The 1860s conflicts involved 18,000 British troops and about 4000 Maori warriors and over the course of the Taranaki and Waikato campaigns took the lives of a total of 800 Europeans and 1800 Maori
  3. 3. The New Zealand wars were a series of 19th-century battles between some Māori tribes and government forces (which included British and colonial troops and their Māori allies, known as kūpapa).
  4. 4. Reason behind conflict • In the mid 1800’s, conflict was developing between European and Maori. The European settlers were anxious to obtain more land for farming, but many of the Maori tribes were increasingly reluctant to sell their precious land. • Acquisition of land had often taken place with little understanding on both sides. • Totally different thinking regarding the land Maori believed that , “We do not own the land, The land owns us” However, European just wanted the land for farming and the other uses only.
  5. 5. Imperial and colonial Maori
  6. 6. How both parties react during the conflict • As the non-Maori population of New Zealand grew during the 1850s, Maori faced more pressure to sell their land to these new settlers. • The 1860s conflicts involved 18,000 British troops and about 4000 Maori warriors and over the course of the Taranaki and Waikato campaigns took the lives of a total of 800 Europeans and 1800 Maori. Both parties proved really aggressive throughout the conflict.
  7. 7. Treaty of Waitangi as negotiated settlement Treaty to establish some sort of British Governor of New Zealand, take into account Maori ownership with their lands as well as other properties, and provides Māori this protection under the law of British topics. The Treaty was needed to stop the fighting and selling off of land without the native peoples(Maori) consent. A treaty was drawn up and translated and after much discussion the Treaty was signed on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi in the Bay of Islands . However it is compromise between Maori and British empire.
  8. 8. However, Around 40 chiefs signed the Treaty of Waitangi on 6 February 1840. By the end of the year, about 500 other Maori, including 13 women, had put their names but 39 signed the Maori text. While some had clear expectations about what their agreement would bring, others chose not to sign the Treaty at all. Where as it is clearly seen till 1850 treaty had positive impact. Maori would share the rights and privileges of British subjects under a common system as indicated in the terms of the Treaty and early colonial laws.
  9. 9. James Busby, he helped William Hobson draft the treaty of Waitangi. William Hobson helped by proposing the treaty to the Maori leaders. He also helped by making peace by not killing any Maori villagers. He did that because He was sick of war between our two country and lots of lives being lost. He was also very Christian so he was very much against people fighting.
  10. 10. The Treaty established a British governor in New Zealand, recognized Maori ownership of their lands and other properties, and gave the Maori the rights of British subjects. The Treaty gave Britain sovereignty over New Zealand, and gave the Governor the right to run the country.
  11. 11. REFERENCES •Keenan, D. (2013, July 11). Story: New Zealand wars. In http://www.teara.govt.nz. Retrieved October 17, 2013, from http://www.teara.govt.nz/en/new-zealand-wars •Ministry for Culture and Heritage. (n.d.). Signing the Treaty'. In nzhistory. Retrieved December 20, 2012, from http://www.nzhistory.net.nz/politics/treaty/making-the-treaty/signing-the-treaty •Treaty of Waitangi | New Zealand. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.newzealand.com/int/feature/treaty-of-waitangi/ •Introduction and Background: Treaty of Waitangi Fact Sheet - Christchurch City Libraries. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://christchurchcitylibraries.com/Society/Politics/New-Zealand/TreatyOf-Waitangi/ •Treaty of Waitangi - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 22, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Waitangi •The Treaty of Waitangi. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.treatyofwaitangi.net.nz/WhyaTreaty.html •Treaty of waitangi presentation. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/tnisroom18/treaty-of-waitangi-presentation-5826576 •beehive.govt.nz - Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.beehive.govt.nz/portfolio/treaty-of-waitangi-negotiations •Treaty of Waitangi claims and settlements - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (n.d.). Retrieved October 22, 2013, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_of_Waitangi_claims_and_settlements

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