Organic architecture and park güell

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Organic architecture and park güell

  1. 1. PARK GUELL By Gaudi GÜRKAN GÜNEY & BERKAY ARIKAN
  2. 2. OUTLINE What is organic architecture?  Definition  Principles Gaudi  His Architectural Philosophy Park Güelle  History  Parts of Park Güell References
  3. 3. WHAT IS ORGANIC ARCHITECTURE? Organic architecture is a philosophy of architecture... It aims to ensure harmony between human habitation and the natural world by concerning some design attitudes such as sympathetic and well integrated with its site that buildings, furnishings, and surroundings become part of a unified, interrelated composition. In order to represent themselves as a whole structure, materials, motifs and basic ordering principles are used in a certain and continuous order... the idea of organic architecture represent also itself as a unified organism... every structural elements, urban components and landscape principles are related to each other... reflects the symbiotic ordering systems of nature... ecological + individual = organic
  4. 4.  At the same time organic architecture represents both environmental characteristics and human spirits... organic architecture embodies an expression of individuality and also our desire to connect to nature... Using Nature as our basis for design... In the understanding of organic architecture; a building or design should be shaped as nature grows, from the inside out... nature grows from the idea of a seed and reaches out to its surroundings... thus, a building should be similar to an organism and must reflects the beauty and complexity of Nature...
  5. 5.  as a result of organic architecture design process, unique and original forms reflects the personality and needs of architects... by using natural forms and materials, organic architecture aims to create architectural structures and urban components similar to organic creatures or plants but are wholly new and inventive... Harmony with its surroundings and the environment...
  6. 6. WHERE DID THE TERM COME FROM? The term "Organic Architecture" was invented by the great architect, Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959). "So here I stand before you preaching organic architecture: declaring organic architecture to be the modern ideal and the teaching so much needed if we are to see the whole of life, and to now serve the whole of life, holding no traditions essential to the great TRADITION. Nor cherishing any preconceived form fixing upon us either past, present or future, but instead exalting the simple laws of common sense or of super- sense if you prefer determining form by way of the nature of materials..." (Frank Lloyd Wright, An Organic Architecture, 1939 ) A well known example of organic architecture is Fallingwater...
  7. 7. JUST AS IN NATURE ... Organic Architecture involves a respect for natural materials:  wood should look like wood... blending into the surroundings:  a house should be of the hill, not on it... an honest expression of the function of the building:  dont make a bank look like a Greek temple...
  8. 8. ARCHITECT AND PLANNER DAVID PEARSON PROPOSED A LIST OF RULESTOWARDS THE DESIGN OF ORGANIC ARCHITECTURE. .. "Let the design:  be inspired by nature and be sustainable, healthy, conserving, and diverse.  unfold, like an organism, from the seed within.  exist in the "continuous present" and "begin again and again".  follow the flows and be flexible and adaptable.  satisfy social, physical, and spiritual needs.  "grow out of the site" and be unique.  celebrate the spirit of youth, play and surprise.  express the rhythm of music and the power of dance."
  9. 9. Among with Frank LloydWright, Gaudi is anotherfamous architect who adoptprinciple of organicarchitecture...
  10. 10. WHO IS GAUDI? GAUDI(25 June 1852 – Barcelona, 10 June 1926) Antoni Gaudí was a Spanish Catalan architect... He is the best representative of Catalan modernism... Most Gaudis works are situated in the Catalan capital of Barcelona... Gaudi is also one of the forerunner of Art Nouveau... Gaudi especially pay attention to nature and the importance that he attached to geometric forms...
  11. 11. HIS DISTINGUISHING WORKS ARE; Casa Calvet (1898-1900), still vaguely neo-Baroque, the gaily colored Casa Batllo (1904-1906), the plastic, monolithic CasaMila (1906-1910) on Passeig de Gracia in Barcelona, Villa Bellesguard (1900-1905) in an historically important outlying area of the city, the remodeling of the cathedral of Palma de Mallorca (1903-14), Colonia Güell (1898-1915), Sagrada Família(1882), Park Güell (1900-14), highly singular city-garden which became a public park...
  12. 12.  he was both an innovative and traditionalist... he tried to encompass the surroundings,the landscape and environment with the architecture of building... information and inspiration in nature... e.g.; his style of placing arches to the attics of his buildings resemble a skeleton of vertebrates... the columns of the Sagrada Familia are just like trees... his curvilinear façades, balconies and walls portrait the rising of the sea and the waving of grasslands in the wind... the creation of the universe,
  13. 13. PARK GÜELL( 1900-1914)
  14. 14.  Park Güell is a municipal garden area located in Barcelona, Spain. The Parc Guell is located on Mount Caramel Turó on the hillside overlooking the sea... The land has a total area of 18 hectares... Guell designed this park for the Guell family... Park Güell is one of the major parks in Barcelona... It is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site "Works of Antoni Gaudí"... intended to recall an English garden suburb...
  15. 15. PARTS OF PARK GÜELL
  16. 16. Gaudí avoided leveling the grounds so that the park has a network of twisting roads which follow the contours ofthe land.The lowest point is the entrance, from which a double staircase leads to the hypostyle chamber, the ceiling ofwhich serves as the floor of the huge public square.Outlying areas have imaginative viaducts and colonnades, which in their design evoke natural forms.
  17. 17. MAIN ENTRANCE AND WALLS the park is surrounded by a wall of undressed stone... There are seven entrances into the park but the main entrance (also the lowest point) is at Carrer dOlot...
  18. 18. detail of the windows of the southern gate lodge....
  19. 19. Medallions with "park" or "güell" punctuate the wall...Pictorial use of trencadis or broken ceramic and faience chips...
  20. 20. The main gate is flanked by two rubblework buildings...Both have oval ground plans and tall central towers which serve as ventilator shafts...
  21. 21. MAIN STAIRCASES The double staircase has walls on each side with crenelated tops and sides of checkerboard tiles...
  22. 22. Part way up the staircase the head of a serpent is seen against a background medallion with thecoat of arms of Catalan...
  23. 23. Farther up the stairway the viewer encounters the famous dragon or lizard with "scales" of tiles...This creature had already made an appearance in Gaudís works in the art nouveau wrought irongate at the Güell estate...
  24. 24. Here Zerbst believes the playful reference has a symbolic resonance: "the dragon represents python, guardianof the subterranean waters, and Gaudi thus alludes darkly to what is of immense importance for the park, butwhich escapes the eye: behind the dragon a cistern lies concealed that can contain up to 2,600 gallons ofwater; it was conceived as a rainwater collector. in this manner, rainwater was channeled into the collector andstored to irrigate the barren parkland, deprived as it is of any natural springs" (153).
  25. 25. Stairs provides bench seating...One of the landings part way up the staircase has an art nouveau gate...
  26. 26. HYPOSTYLE CHAMBER
  27. 27. The hypostyle chamber, also called the chamber of the hundred columns...Designed originally as a marketplace...The roof supports the floor of the public square above it...The columns are hollow in order to provide a channel for rain water to the cistern...
  28. 28. Like greek columns, these doric variations are "slightly oblique and broaden towards the base.However, in gaudís work these features are a bit more exaggerated than in the original doriccolumns" (zerbst, 158)...
  29. 29. To eliminate the sense of crowding, gaudí occasionally eliminated a column...
  30. 30.  old-fashioned Doric hall of columns to hold up the esplanade... the silhouette of the entablature around the exterior columns gives way to the ceramic scallops of the bench-balustrade above the hall of columns, give it a happy, folksy touch.” Bergos
  31. 31. more classical....
  32. 32. The wall surrounding the public square above the hypostyle chamber twists around the plaza and is designed asa continuous bench for seating...the top of the hypostyle hall with the bench/wall of the square and the gargoyle/dog waterspouts...
  33. 33. PUBLIC SQUARE... The public square is at the center of the park... At about 160 feet by 120 feet, half of it is supported by solid ground, the other half is supported on the Doric columns of the hypostyle chamber below. The wall surrounding this large plaza is designed as one long curving and twisting bench. Brightly colored broken tiles and faience create mosaic designs--a technique called trencadis. Sources differ on its attribution. Some say that some patterns are by Gaudí as well as the workmen who created the park.
  34. 34. Looking down from the square to the main entrance and the caretakers lodge....
  35. 35. BUILDINGS FLANKING ENTRANCE Two buildings, constructed of undressed stone like the external walls of the park, flank the main entrance of the park... The walls of these buildings then seem to grow out of the parks wall. Both have undulating roofs and tall central towers...
  36. 36. BRIDGES, VIADUCTS, OUTSKIRTS Roads follow the natural contours of the land and bridges and viaducts seem like natural forms... Struts bearing the wall become containers for flowers at the top...
  37. 37. The house his father and Gaudí lived in--the younger until 1925...It was designed by Francesc Berenguer in 1906...
  38. 38. PICTURES AND DEPICTIONS OF PARK GUELL
  39. 39. REFERENCES Bergos, Joan.Translated by Gerardo Denis. “Gaudi The Man And His Work” Printed In Spain. Lunwerg Editores, 1999. Descharnes, Robert. Prevost, Clovis. “ The Visionary” Preface By Salvador Dali. Dorset Press, Newyork. 1971,1982 by Edita S. A Lausanne. Kliczkowski, H. “Complete Works GAUDI” Spain, Barcelona 2002. Permanyer, Lluis. “Gaudi Of Barcelona” Rizzoli International Publications, Inc.First Published In The United States of America in 1997. Rusell, Frank. “Art Nouveau Architecture” Arch Cope Press, 1986 New York. Güell, Xavier. Antoni Gaudi: works and projects. Editorial Gustavo Gili, Barcelona. Campbell Katie. 2006. Icons of Twentieth-Century Landscape Design. London: Frances Lincoln Crippa, Maria Antonietta. 2003. Antoni Gaudi︠, 1852-1926: From Nature to Architecture. Köln: Taschen García i Aranzueque, Raül& Montes, Cristina. 2002. Gaudí: modernist architecture in Barcelona. Madrid: Rivas-Vaciamadrid Watkin, David.2005. A History of Western Architecture. China: Laurence King Publishing. Kent,Conrad, Prindle Dennis Joseph .1993. Park Güell. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. Fletcher Sir Banister, Cruickshank Dan. 1996. Sir Banister Fletchers: A History of Architecture. Rainer Zerbst. Antoni Gaudí. Köln: Benedikt Taschen Verlag GmbH, 1985. http://www.gaudidesigner.com/uk/parc-guell-map-of-the-park-guell-designed-by-gaudi-around- 1903_241.html http://www.cecilhowell.com/Site/Guell.html http://www.urbansketchers.org/2010_09_14_archive.html http://courses.umass.edu/latour/Spain/nwest/index.html http://www.steven.mcgann.com/amorphism.html

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