Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Birth of Venus in paintings

1,414 views

Published on

The Birth of Venus_paintings

Published in: Art & Photos
  • Be the first to comment

The Birth of Venus in paintings

  1. 1. The Birth of Venus in paintings
  2. 2. Throughout the ages, stories with certain basic themes have recurred over and over, in widely disparate cultures; emerging like the goddess Venus from the sea of our unconscious. Joan Vinge (b. 1948), writer
  3. 3. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus c. 1485 Tempera on canvas, 172.5 x 278.5 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  4. 4. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  5. 5. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  6. 6. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  7. 7. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  8. 8. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  9. 9. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  10. 10. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  11. 11. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  12. 12. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  13. 13. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  14. 14. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  15. 15. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  16. 16. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  17. 17. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  18. 18. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  19. 19. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  20. 20. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus (detail) 1879 Oil on canvas, 300 x 215 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  21. 21. CABANEL, Alexandre The Birth of Venus 1863 Oil on canvas, 130 x 225 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  22. 22. CABANEL, Alexandre The Birth of Venus (detail) 1863 Oil on canvas, 130 x 225 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  23. 23. CABANEL, Alexandre The Birth of Venus (detail) 1863 Oil on canvas, 130 x 225 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  24. 24. CABANEL, Alexandre The Birth of Venus (detail) 1863 Oil on canvas, 130 x 225 cm Musée d'Orsay, Paris
  25. 25. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  26. 26. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus (detail) 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  27. 27. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus (detail) 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  28. 28. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus (detail) 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  29. 29. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus (detail) 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  30. 30. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus (detail) 1740 Oil on canvas, 130 x 162 cm Nationalmuseum, Stockholm
  31. 31. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré The Birth of Venus 1753-1755 Oil on canvas Musée Grobet-Labadié, Marseille
  32. 32. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré The Birth of Venus (detail) 1753-1755 Oil on canvas Musée Grobet-Labadié, Marseille
  33. 33. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré The Birth of Venus (detail) 1753-1755 Oil on canvas Musée Grobet-Labadié, Marseille
  34. 34. DELVAUX, Paul Birth of Venus 1947 Oil on canvas, 140x210 cm Private collection
  35. 35. DELVAUX, Paul Birth of Venus (detail) 1947 Oil on canvas, 140x210 cm Private collection
  36. 36. DELVAUX, Paul Birth of Venus (detail) 1947 Oil on canvas, 140x210 cm Private collection
  37. 37. DELVAUX, Paul Birth of Venus (detail) 1947 Oil on canvas, 140x210 cm Private collection
  38. 38. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus 1934 Oil on canvas, 51.00 x 69.00 cm Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh
  39. 39. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus (detail) 1934 Oil on canvas, 51.00 x 69.00 cm Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh)
  40. 40. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus (detail) 1934 Oil on canvas, 51.00 x 69.00 cm Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh)
  41. 41. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus (detail) 1934 Oil on canvas, 51.00 x 69.00 cm Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh)
  42. 42. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus (detail) 1934 Oil on canvas, 51.00 x 69.00 cm Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art - National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh)
  43. 43. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  44. 44. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  45. 45. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  46. 46. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  47. 47. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  48. 48. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  49. 49. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus (detail) 1550 Fresco Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
  50. 50. The Birth of Venus in Paintings images and text credit www. Music wav. created olga.e. thanks for watching oes
  51. 51. VASARI, Giorgio The Birth of Venus Venus is in the middle, standing on a shell, surrounded by divine and sea creatures paying homage to her: on the left is Teti, on the opposite side is the god of the sea Neptune, “il quale sta ammirato e immoto a vedere surgere dall’onde quella Dea tanto bella” (who stands still and full of admiration for such a beautiful Goddess coming out of the waves). Then there are the Tritons and the Nereids, offering shells, pearls, corals, the purple, motherpearls. During the reign of Duke Cosimo I de' Medici, the Palazzo Vecchio was transformed, from being merely the seat of the government, it also became the residence of the Lord of Florence. On the second floor were the apartments of the Elementi, the elements, with their five rooms and two loggias decorated with symbolic paintings. The Birth of Venus is symbolizing Water in the Room of Elements.
  52. 52. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus The Birth of Venus is undoubtedly one of the world’s most famous and appreciated works of art. Painted by Sandro Botticelli between 1482 and 1485, it has become a landmark of XV century Italian painting, so rich in meaning and allegorical references to antiquity. The theme comes from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, a very important oeuvre of the Latin literature. Venus is portrayed naked on a shell on the seashore; on her left the winds blow gently caressing her hair with a shower of roses, on her right a handmaid (Ora) waits for the goddess to go closer to dress her shy body. The meadow is sprinkled with violets, symbol of modesty but often used for love potions.
  53. 53. BOUGUEREAU, William-Adolphe The Birth of Venus At the center of the painting, Venus stands nude on a scallop shell being pulled by a dolphin, one of her symbols. Fifteen putti, including Cupid and Psyche, and several nymphs and centaurs have gathered to witness Venus' arrival. Most of the figures are gazing at her, and two of the centaurs are blowing into conch and Triton shells, signaling her arrival. Venus is considered to be the embodiment of feminine beauty and form, and these traits are shown in the painting. Her head is tilted to one side, and her facial expression is calm, comfortable with her nudity. To the upper-left of the painting, there is a shadow in the clouds. It appears to be the silhouette of the artist, with a head, shoulder, arm, and a raised fist that would seem to hold a paintbrush
  54. 54. CABANEL, Alexandre The Birth of Venus The Birth of Venus was one of the great successes of the 1863 Salon where it was bought by Napoleon III for his private collection. Cabanel took as his subject a famous episode from classical mythology when Venus is born of sea-foam and carried ashore. This theme, very popular in the 19th century, provided some artists with the opportunity to introduce eroticism without offending public morality, under the pretext of representing a classical subject. For Cabanel, the mythological theme is indeed a pretext for the portrayal of a nude figure, which, though idealised, is nonetheless depicted in a lascivious pose. Emile Zola denounced this ambiguity: "The goddess, drowned in a sea of milk, resembles a delicious courtesan, but not of flesh and blood – that would be indecent – but made of a sort of pink and white marzipan". The writer was thus deploring the use of a pale, smooth and opalescent palette. That same year, Edouard Manet's Olympia caused a scandal. The subject of the two paintings is identical: a reclining nude. But the calm assurance with which Manet's subject stares back at the viewer seems much more provocative than the languid pose of Cabanel's Venus.
  55. 55. BOUCHER, François The Birth of Venus also known as The Triumph of Venus Venus, the story goes, was born of the sea. She was the fruit of Uranus' amputated genitals, which fell to earth and, in their union with the sea, generated the Goddess of Love. She hovers on a canopy of mother-of-pearl, upholstered with pink and pearl-grey silk and held up by the winds and cupids. She is attended by a court of white naiads and bronzed tritons. Gods, dolphins, fabrics, water, clouds together make up a swirling movement which Boucher has painted in cold colours: blue and turquoise. Both composition and colours belong to the Rococo. The sea blends with a greyish-blue sky and the horizon is not easily distinguishable.
  56. 56. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré The Birth of Venus Fragonard's work for the most part has a very charming look to it, it's very sweet in a sense. This painting feels very balanced because of its diagonal composition that seems to split the canvas. The colors are very pastel-like. Venus looks almost like a doll, and the figures around her seem to almost melt into the ocean with the blue pastel-like chaotic waves.
  57. 57. DELVAUX, Paul Birth of Venus Like his contemporaries Giorgio de Chirico and René Magritte, Delvaux used bizarre subject matter rather than abstraction as a means of expressiveness. In so doing, he created uncomfortable scenes that were designed to emotionally shock the viewer. Nude women are a hallmark of Delvaux's work. They exist somewhere between the realm of statuary and of sex objects, and their very ambiguity is one of the most arresting and confounding features of Delvaux's paintings. Delvaux's paintings depict bizarre scenes that bring together elements that don't make sense. His highly naturalistic painting technique compounds the uneasy feeling of his scenes. That such peculiar things are depicted within such believable spaces - without any abstraction of forms and with a bright light that leaves nothing in murky shadow - is disquieting.
  58. 58. BAIRD, Edward MacEwan The Birth of Venus This painting is a rare example of Scottish Surrealism. It was painted as a wedding present for the artist James McIntosh Patrick. McIntosh Patrick said of Baird's gift, “It rather shocked me as he painted so few pictures yet he gave this one away. He was our best man and, being a sentimental person, he chose Venus, the goddess of love, as the subject of the painting. He was a keen Scottish Nationalist; he also admired Botticelli and Crivelli, the Renaissance painters. Hence the 'Scottish Venus' as he called it, arose out of his associations with a wedding, his involvement with Scottish Nationalism, his love for messing about in boats, and his love of Botticelli.”
  59. 59. In Roman mythology, Venus was the goddess of love, sex, beauty, and fertility. She was the Roman counterpart to the Greek Aphrodite. However, Roman Venus had many abilities beyond the Greek Aphrodite; she was a goddess of victory, fertility, and even prostitution. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Venus-Aphrodite was born of the foam from the sea after Saturn (Greek Cronus) castrated his father Uranus (Ouranus) and his blood fell to the sea. This latter explanation appears to be more a popular theory due to the countless artworks depicting Venus rising from the sea in a clam.

×