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Cupid and Psyche_ Paintings

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Cupid and Psyche in Paintings

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Cupid and Psyche_ Paintings

  1. 1. Cupid and Psyche Paintings
  2. 2. A metaphysical love story As related the Roman writer Lucius Apuleius in The Golden Ass (late second century AD), Cupid, the god of love, fell in love with the beautiful Psyche and brought her to his palace, where he visited her every night without ever letting her see his face. But curiosity got the better of her, and one night Psyche looked at Cupid while he was asleep. Unfortunately a drop of hot oil fell from her lamp and awakened him, whereupon he abandoned her and the palace disappeared. From then on Psyche was condemned to wander the earth and perform impossible tasks in the vain hope of winning her lover back. The myth was both a love story and a metaphysical allegory, since Psyche is the Greek word for "soul".
  3. 3. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  4. 4. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  5. 5. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  6. 6. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  7. 7. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  8. 8. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  9. 9. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798 Oil on canvas, 186 x 132 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris
  10. 10. DAVID, Jacques-Louis Cupid and Psyche 1817 Oil on canvas, 184 x 242 cm Museum of Art, Cleveland
  11. 11. DAVID, Jacques-Louis Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1817 Oil on canvas, 184 x 242 cm Museum of Art, Cleveland
  12. 12. DAVID, Jacques-Louis Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1817 Oil on canvas, 184 x 242 cm Museum of Art, Cleveland
  13. 13. DAVID, Jacques-Louis Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1817 Oil on canvas, 184 x 242 cm Museum of Art, Cleveland
  14. 14. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower 1792-93 Oil on canvas, 198 x 151 cm National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
  15. 15. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower (detail) 1792-93 Oil on canvas, 198 x 151 cm National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
  16. 16. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower (detail) 1792-93 Oil on canvas, 198 x 151 cm National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
  17. 17. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower (detail) 1792-93 Oil on canvas, 198 x 151 cm National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
  18. 18. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower (detail) 1792-93 Oil on canvas, 198 x 151 cm National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
  19. 19. BURNE-JONES, Edward Pan and Psyche 1872-1874 Oil on canvas, 65.1 × 53.3 cm Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge
  20. 20. BURNE-JONES, Edward Pan and Psyche (detail) 1872-1874 Oil on canvas, 65.1 × 53.3 cm Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge
  21. 21. BURNE-JONES, Edward Pan and Psyche (detail) 1872-1874 Oil on canvas, 65.1 × 53.3 cm Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge
  22. 22. BURNE-JONES, Edward Pan and Psyche (detail) 1872-1874 Oil on canvas, 65.1 × 53.3 cm Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge
  23. 23. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche 1867 Oil on canvas, 116.8 x 141.4 cm Tate Britain, London
  24. 24. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1867 Oil on canvas, 116.8 x 141.4 cm Tate Britain, London
  25. 25. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1867 Oil on canvas, 116.8 x 141.4 cm Tate Britain, London
  26. 26. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1867 Oil on canvas, 116.8 x 141.4 cm Tate Britain, London
  27. 27. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1867 Oil on canvas, 116.8 x 141.4 cm Tate Britain, London
  28. 28. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche 1798-1805 Oil on canvas, 220.5 x 155.5 cm Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona
  29. 29. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798-1805 Oil on canvas, 220.5 x 155.5 cm Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona
  30. 30. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798-1805 Oil on canvas, 220.5 x 155.5 cm Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona
  31. 31. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798-1805 Oil on canvas, 220.5 x 155.5 cm Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona
  32. 32. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1798-1805 Oil on canvas, 220.5 x 155.5 cm Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya, Barcelona
  33. 33. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche 1707 -1709 Oil on canvas, 130 x 215 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  34. 34. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1707 -1709 Oil on canvas, 130 x 215 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  35. 35. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1707 -1709 Oil on canvas, 130 x 215 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  36. 36. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1707 -1709 Oil on canvas, 130 x 215 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  37. 37. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1707 -1709 Oil on canvas, 130 x 215 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence
  38. 38. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche 1639-40 Oil on canvas, 199,4 x 191,8 cm Royal Collection, Windsor
  39. 39. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1639-40 Oil on canvas, 199,4 x 191,8 cm Royal Collection, Windsor
  40. 40. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1639-40 Oil on canvas, 199,4 x 191,8 cm Royal Collection, Windsor
  41. 41. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1639-40 Oil on canvas, 199,4 x 191,8 cm Royal Collection, Windsor
  42. 42. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche (detail) 1639-40 Oil on canvas, 199,4 x 191,8 cm Royal Collection, Windsor
  43. 43. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid 1753 Oil on canvas, 168 x 192 cm National Gallery, London
  44. 44. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid (detail) 1753 Oil on canvas, 168 x 192 cm National Gallery, London
  45. 45. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid (detail) 1753 Oil on canvas, 168 x 192 cm National Gallery, London
  46. 46. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid (detail) 1753 Oil on canvas, 168 x 192 cm National Gallery, London
  47. 47. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid (detail) 1753 Oil on canvas, 168 x 192 cm National Gallery, London
  48. 48. Cupid and Psyche Paintings images and text credit www. Music wav. created olga.e. thanks for watching oes
  49. 49. FRAGONARD, Jean-Honoré Psyche Showing Her Sisters Her Gifts from Cupid Fragonard's work is probably based on La Fontaine's version of the fable. After falling in love with Psyche, Cupid had visited her only at night, forbidding her to look upon him. In the painting, Psyche shows her two sisters the gifts she has received from her lover, and moved by jealousy - a Fury appears in the sky above the sisters - they persuade her to uncover Cupid's identity and thus wreck her happiness.
  50. 50. GÉRARD, François Cupid and Psyche Gérard shows Cupid kissing the young woman's forehead, unseen by her. Surprised and aroused, Psyche is shyly crossing her arms over her naked breasts. This is the first pang of love, the beginning of a love story that would take Psyche and Cupid through all kinds of trials and tribulations before their marriage on Mount Olympus. The scene painted by Gérard therefore symbolizes the Neoplatonic theme of the union of the human soul and divine love. The artist has painted a butterfly hovering over the young woman's head: the insect's name in ancient Greek is also "psyche" and symbolizes the soul.
  51. 51. DAVID, Jacques-Louis Cupid and Psyche David used the story of Cupid and Psyche to explore the conflict between idealized love and physical reality. Cupid, lover of the beautiful mortal Psyche, visited her nightly on the condition that she not know his identity. Cupid was usually depicted as an ideal adolescent, but here David presents him as an ungainly teenager smirking at his sexual conquest. David took inspiration from a number of ancient texts, including an obscure Greek poem by Moschus that describes Cupid as a mean-spirited brat with dark skin, flashing eyes, and curly hair.
  52. 52. HAMILTON, Hugh Douglas Cupid and Psyche in the Nuptial Bower The classical myth of Cupid's love for Psyche stirred the imagination of many artists in the eighteenth century. In spite of the title, Hamilton's interpretation seems to show an earlier episode in the story. The scene is a woodland setting at night. The figures are placed in front of a large tree over which is placed a red canopy. In the background is a lake-side. The youthful, handsome Cupid sits on the bank by the tree and gently draws Psyche towards him. In spite of her hesitancy the love of the two is evident. This work was inspired by a sculpture of the same subject by Antonio Canova, who was working in Rome during Hamilton's last years in that city. Canova's neo-classical forms are recalled in the smooth, idealised figures of the young lovers. The mythological theme of the painting is reinforced with symbolism. Both figures are winged, Psyche's wings being those of a butterfly, symbol of both the soul and of Psyche in Greek art. In the right foreground of the composition, a real butterfly rests on a rose, an attribute of cupid. In the left foreground his other attributes, the bow and quiver are laid on the ground. Silhouetted against the background on the left is ivy, symbol of immortality.
  53. 53. BURNE-JONES, Edward Pan and Psyche When Psyche is distraught over the loss of her love Eros, she attempts suicide in a river. She survives and the god Pan offers her comfort and advice. Burne-Jones painted this version of Pan and Psyche after his lover, Mary Zambaco, attempted to throw herself in Regent’s Canal in an ugly and embarrassing scene. It was the breaking point of an illicit relationship that was painful for all involved. Burne-Jones had intense feelings for Mary but could not bring himself to abandon his children or his wife Georgie. Mary had grown increasingly desperate and, upon the realization that he would not leave his family, presented Ned with a sufficient amount of Laudanum to kill them both. In response to his shocked refusal, she ran to the river and he was forced to wrestle her to the ground.
  54. 54. LEGROS, Alphonse Cupid and Psyche The Roman poet Lucius Apuleius wrote the tale of Cupid and Psyche. Psyche was given a box containing beauty for the goddess Venus. But she could not resist looking inside it and was sent into a deep sleep. Legros shows the moment when her lover, Cupid, discovers her in her torpor. He is about to wake her with a touch of his arrow. The composition of the reclining female figure shows the influence of Italian artists such as Giorgione and Titian, as well as Rembrandt.
  55. 55. GOYA Y LUCIENTES, Francisco de Allegory of Love, Cupid and Psyche The scene is associated with the story of Cupid and Psyche, immortalised in the 'Metamorphoses' by Lucius Apuleius, in which the god of sexual attraction falls in love with Psyche and visits her at night always to conceal his identity. This is an allegory of love with an erotic touch. The composition is similar to that of Titian's work 'Tarquin and Lucretia', which formed part of the Spanish royal collections from 1571 and is now kept at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. Similarities have been pointed out between the model of female personifying Psyche and the one that posed for Goya's 'Majas', and with María Gabriela Palafox y Portocarrero, Marquesa de Lazán, painted by Goya in 1804.
  56. 56. CRESPI, Giuseppe Maria Cupid and Psyche This painting has been in the Uffizi Gallery since 1926. The episode depicted was drawn from the Metamorphosis by Apuleius (V. 22). Cupid, in love with Psyche, appears to her under a false semblance, prohibiting her from seeing and recognizing him. Driven by curiosity, Psyche observes Cupid by the light of a lantern and accidentally awakens him. For this reason she will be abandoned by the god and punished.
  57. 57. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Cupid and Psyche Cupid and Psyche is without doubt one of the most beautiful paintings undertaken by Van Dyck for Charles I. The story of Cupid and Psyche was well known at the English court. The source is The Golden Ass by Apuleius (Books 4-6). Van Dyck has chosen the moment when Cupid discovers Psyche overcome by sleep after opening the casket which Venus had requested her to bring back, unopened, from Proserpine in Hades. This was one of the tricks set by Venus in Psyche's attempt to find Cupid. Compositionally, there is a kinship with paintings of Adam and Eve or the Annunciation. It is stated traditionally that Psyche's features resembled those of Van Dyck's mistress, Margaret Lemon. The sense of movement implied by Cupid's arrival contrasts with the stillness of Psyche asleep to create a tension that is the very essence of the picture, matching perfectly the contrast within the story itself between Beauty (Psyche) and Desire (Cupid). Such ethereal neo-Platonic ideals, which were open to various interpretations about love and the soul, were nurtured as part of the court life of Charles I and Henrietta Maria.

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