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Children of Murillo.ppsx

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Enfants de Murillo.ppsx
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Children of Murillo.ppsx

  1. 1. undisputed protagonists of the canvases of one of the great masters of Spanish Golden Age painting, divine children and children with no divinity at all, street children, poor, mischievous, badly dressed and dirty, healthy, innocent ... and painted with an extraordinary humanity
  2. 2. Children of Murillo
  3. 3. The holy children of Murillo. Although these holy children display an idealised beauty that is absent from the children depicted in Murillo´s genre paintings, their gestures and expressions are very lifelike.
  4. 4. The painting reflects the moment in which the Child Jesus gives his cousin Saint John the Baptist water to drink with a shell ... The Christ Child points towards the soft light emanating from the golden mist formed by the clouds into which the angels appear to merge. In the background dark, threatening storm clouds seem to predict the destiny of both Children. On Saint John´s cross, a ribbon in the manner of a scroll flutters with the inscription "ECCE AGNUS DEI", proclaiming the Christ Child as "lamb of God". By placing the lamb in the foreground staring at the two boys, Murillo emphasizes its duality as symbol of Christ and favorite companion of any child, thereby placing the religious event in a domestic context. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Los niños de la concha The Holy Children with a Shell or The Infant Christ and Saint John the Baptist with a Shell Les Enfants de la coquille ou L'Enfant Jésus et saint Jean-Baptiste à la coquille 1670-1675 Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
  5. 5. The name with which the virgin is designated comes from a legend. There are two versions of it. According to the first of them, the Capuchin friars noticed that a napkin had disappeared from their household goods, but a few days later it was returned to them by Murillo himself with the drawing of the Virgin. In the second version it was a friar of the convent who asked Murillo for a representation of the Virgin and Child so that he could pray privately in his cell. Murillo accepted, but requested a canvas to make the painting. The friar, however, lacked financial resources and gave him a napkin on which Murillo painted the work. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo La Virgen de la Servilleta Madonna and Child of the Napkin Vierge de la serviette, Vierge à l’Enfant de la serviette 1666 Museo de Bellas Artes, Sevilla
  6. 6. Intimate, lyrical and very different from Murillo's customary representations of floating putti. There are no haloes in this picture, nor is there any hint of the schematic arrangement seen in Baroque religious pictures. Here the Holy Family is portrayed as a simple human family. There is an element of sentimentality in the scene: the parents watch fondly as the Child plays with the dog and the bird. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo La Sagrada Familia del Pajarito The Holy Family with a Little Bird La Sainte Famille à l'oisillon 1650 Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
  7. 7. Murillo's little angels. The floating putti venerating and surrounding the Immaculates.
  8. 8. Little angels accompany the Holy Spirit who comes to Mary. Murillo depicts them as putti from classical mythology, but with the wings characteristic of angels. They are babies with pink skin, plump and with a sweet and childish character. They create an unreal atmosphere of the scene, a scene totally within the divine scenery. These scenes in the Seville of the time conveyed a mystery, but this type of little angels sweetened it thanks to Murillo's quality, his loose brushstrokes. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo La Anunciación Annunciation L’Annonciation 1660 Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
  9. 9. Children's angels holding flowers or olive branches He follows the same pattern to paint the angels who accompany his Immaculates: small children, with pink skin, and with the sense of innocence and purity that should be present in a Marian scene, such as that of the Immaculate Conception. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo La Inmaculada del Escorial The Immaculate Conception of El Escorial L'Immaculée de l'Escorial 1660-1665 Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid
  10. 10. Murillo's poor children … children playing, begging for food, naughty, real sevillian street urchins, poorly dressed and dirty, innocent who interrupt their games so that the spectator directs them a look of sympathy
  11. 11. Two young boys are sitting in a sheltered corner gorging themselves on fruit probably stolen … and a basket full of grapes forms by itself a still life. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Niños comiendo uvas y melón Children Eating Grapes and a Melon , Boys Eating Grapes and Melon Mangeurs de raisin et de melon 1650 Alte Pinakothek, Múnich
  12. 12. While the two children are immersed in the dice game, the younger child chewing a piece of bread looks directly at the viewer. They are poor children, with an air of innocence, but naughty at the same time, carefree, full of life, children who with cunning and skill seek their necessary food to survive, while spending their time having fun. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Niños jugando a los dados Young Boys Playing Dice Enfants jouant aux dés 1675-1680 Alte Pinakothek, Bayerisches Nationalmuseum, Múnich
  13. 13. A ragged, mischievous and cheerful boy, playing with a dog ... the thematic model of many of Murillo's paintings, children victims of the shortcomings that occurred in the seventeenth century, and that affect a Seville drowned by taxes and competition from Cádiz, after the plague of 1649. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Muchacho con un perro Boy with a Dog Garçon avec un chien 1655 The Hermitage, St. Petersburg
  14. 14. A little girl with the face of a Madonna, a contented little boy examining the earnings she holds in her hand and a basket full of grapes which is, in itself, a still-life of the highest quality. The apparent poverty of the two figures, their unchill-like but necessary employment suggest a sense of hopelessness and misery. And yet these children seem to exude an air of rapt serenity and contented enjoyment of life. Herein lies Murillo's Christian message: because these children do not see their poverty as a burden, and because they do not regard their existence as joyless, they are beautiful and "dignified". … It is thus a painting that could adorn the walls of any ruler's palace. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo La pequeña vendedora de fruta The Little Fruit Seller La petite marchande de fruits 1670-1680 Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Múnich
  15. 15. delousing himself ... a child in ragged clothes, with dirty feet and a still life: clay pitcher, basket with apples, remains of shrimp or other crustaceans (The act of delousing oneself can be seen as a way of being in control of one's own mind and body, a hygienic act often done by mothers in Dutch genre paintings.) Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Joven mendigo o Niño espulgándose The Young Beggar Le Jeune Mendiant 1645-1650 Musée du Louvre, Paris
  16. 16. A peasant boy leans on a chipped stone block or sill and looks towards something, or someone, that makes him smile ... Murillo gave these anonymous figures individuality, prominence and dignity, presenting them as people with feelings and the ability to express them. In this particular case, the broad, expressive smile on the boy’s face contrasts with his shabby attire. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Niño riendo, Niño campesino apoyado en un alfeizar A Peasant Boy Leaning on a Sill Petit paysan au balcon 1670-1675 National Gallery, London
  17. 17. It seems plausible to associate this work with the old Spanish saying: “Child with lice, healthy and handsome; child without, weak and sickly.” The theme is particularly widespread in Dutch painting, which Murillo could have seen in private collections in Seville. The scene unfolds in a humble dwelling although it is not an impoverished household, as details like the bell on the dog’s collar and eyeglass on the old woman’s bodice clearly reveal. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Vieja despiojando a un niño The Toilette, Domestic scene La Toilette Domestique 1655-1660 Bayerische Staatsgemäldesammlungen, Alte Pinakothek, Múnich
  18. 18. The charming contrast between the sulking countenance of one boy and the beaming smile of the other ... a young rogue, tempts another boy to join him in the game, perhaps hoping to play for the bread the second boy is tactlessly devouring, or at least share it. ((The game of argolla, consisted in hitting a ball through a hoop driven into the ground.) Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Invitación al juego de la argolla Invitation to a Game of Argolla Invitation à une partie d'Argolla 1665-1670 Dulwich Picture Gallery, London
  19. 19. A black boy asks for some pie from a white boy, who refuses, while another turns to the viewer and grins ... In the 19th century the painting's title, 'The Poor Black Boy,' implied that the boy was begging for charity. However, his earthenware jug, clothes and shoes clearly indicate he is a servant or errand boy whose position is probably better than that of the white boys, who may have resorted to stealing the pie. (The servant boy could even be a portrait of the son of Murillo's household slave girl, Juana de Santiago, who is thought to have been born in 1658 and whom Murillo freed in 1676.) Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Tres muchachos Three children Trois garçons 1670 Dulwich Picture Gallery, London
  20. 20. The quest for the meaning of this remarkable work has yielded contradictory hypotheses, from those who argue that it is simply a family observing something going on in the street, to those who associate it with the practice of prostitution. In any case, the piercing gazes of the two young people and the old woman with her enormous spectacles, brazenly beckon the viewer to join them. The fashionable attire of the young man and the rest of the figures - with the exception of the conspicuous tear in the child’s trousers - bespeak a higher economic, if not social, station. (The boy’s exposed buttock has caused this painting some problems, and it has been painted over on more than one occasion in the past. All overpainting has now been removed, and this work appears as was intended by the artist.) Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Cuatro figuras en un escalón Four Figures on a Step Quatre figures sur une marche 1655-1660 Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth
  21. 21. o.esqsegues@gmail.com Niños de Murillo Children of Murillo Enfants de Murillo images and text credit www. Music Bring Him Home (from Les Misérables) - The Piano Guys created olga_oes thanks for watching
  22. 22. Bartolomé Esteban Murillo Self-portrait 1668-1670 National Gallery , London La inscripción en latín revela que pintó este autorretrato para ‘cumplir los deseos y oraciones’ de sus hijos. The Latin inscription reveals that he painted this self portrait to ‘fulfil the wishes and prayers’ of his children. L'inscription latine révèle qu'il a peint cet autoportrait pour ‘accomplir les souhaits et les prières’ de ses enfants.

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