Genre<br />
Genre Recap<br /> <br />1) What is genre? <br />2) Why is it important in media studies? <br />3) How do you categorise a ...
When identifying genre the following can be considered:<br />Setting<br />Character<br />Theme<br />Style<br />Narrative<b...
Iconography<br />Look for:<br />	· particular props/gadgets(fast cars, guns)· dress codes of actors· physical attributes· ...
Action films<br />- high energy, big-budget physical stunts and chases, possibly with rescues, battles, fights, escapes, d...
Genre of your opening sequence<br />Identify the genre:<br />Setting <br />Narrative<br />Representation<br />Style<br />I...
		Edward Buscombe<br />Argued that we need to move beyond ‘outer forms’ (iconography) andalso explore the ‘inner forms’ (a...
Rick Altman ‘Semantic/Syntactic’<br />Argued that the identification of a genre needed to include two aspects:<br /><ul><l...
syntax: the search for genre meanings- relationships between undesignated & variable characters (a deeper meaning)
Argued that the semantic was necessary in terms of identification but not in itself interesting</li></li></ul><li>Steve Ne...
Example<br />For the opening sequence of The Holiday, there are some connotations of the romantic comedy- often high key l...
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Week 2 genre

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Week 2 genre

  1. 1. Genre<br />
  2. 2. Genre Recap<br /> <br />1) What is genre? <br />2) Why is it important in media studies? <br />3) How do you categorise a product into a specific genre? <br />4) Why do genres change? <br />
  3. 3. When identifying genre the following can be considered:<br />Setting<br />Character<br />Theme<br />Style<br />Narrative<br />Iconography<br />
  4. 4. Iconography<br />Look for:<br /> · particular props/gadgets(fast cars, guns)· dress codes of actors· physical attributes· settings· mannerisms<br />
  5. 5. Action films<br />- high energy, big-budget physical stunts and chases, possibly with rescues, battles, fights, escapes, destructive crises (floods, explosions, natural disasters, fires, etc.), non-stop motion, spectacular rhythm and pacing, and adventurous, often two-dimensional 'good-guy' heroes (or recently, heroines) battling 'bad guys' - all designed for pure audience escapism.<br />
  6. 6. Genre of your opening sequence<br />Identify the genre:<br />Setting <br />Narrative<br />Representation<br />Style<br />Iconography<br />Consider how your product adheres to the conventions of your chosen genre<br /> Remember that these notes will be used for your revision so make them clear so they are useful to you.<br />
  7. 7. Edward Buscombe<br />Argued that we need to move beyond ‘outer forms’ (iconography) andalso explore the ‘inner forms’ (attitude, tone, purpose) when exploring genre<br />His concept was that there needed to be some thought towards what these genres are trying to say.<br />Used the example of the western where he argued that they tend to be pro-violence (to some capacity, at least)<br />
  8. 8. Rick Altman ‘Semantic/Syntactic’<br />Argued that the identification of a genre needed to include two aspects:<br /><ul><li>semantic: a more systematical approach to genre- shots, locations, characters
  9. 9. syntax: the search for genre meanings- relationships between undesignated & variable characters (a deeper meaning)
  10. 10. Argued that the semantic was necessary in terms of identification but not in itself interesting</li></li></ul><li>Steve Neale ‘Verisimilitude’<br />Verisimilitude can be taken to mean the ‘appearance of truth’. Within film this is obviously crucial.<br />Todorov identified two types of verisimilitude: generic verisimilitude and broader social or cultural verisimilitude i.e. what is normal in a genre film and what is normal in ‘normal’ life.<br />Neale argues that generic verisimilitude allows film-makers to ignore or sidestep realist aspects and still make it feel true to audiences, giving the example of the musical.<br />He also argues that certain genres depend far more on cultural verisimilitude: gangster, war, police films compared to science fiction, gothic horror or slapstick comedies.<br />Least cultural verisimilitude aspects are what attract audiences the most.<br />
  11. 11. Example<br />For the opening sequence of The Holiday, there are some connotations of the romantic comedy- often high key lighting, young, good-looking and relatively wealthy characters.<br />However, this is only one aspect. We can use Buscombe’s theory to think about the attitude that romantic comedies have towards love (inner form), Altman’s theory to delve into a deeper discussion of how romantic comedies appear to condemn single people to a life of unhappiness and we can use Neale’s suggestion to highlight issues of verisimilitude (would Kate Winslet really be struggling to find a boyfriend?)<br />
  12. 12. Summary<br />Genre is a helpful concept for us as an audience and for producers but from an academic point of view it is not a precise concept (especially now) and is flawed. <br />Even if you struggle with the precise aspects of theory, you must adopt a complex approach when discussing theory. <br />

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