THE SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET
A SONNET IS <ul><li>A  lyric poem  consisting of  fourteen  lines </li></ul><ul><li>Written in  iambic pentameter  with a ...
IAMBIC PENTAMETER CONSISTS OF  FIVE IAMBS AN  IAMB  IS A METRICAL FOOT CONSISTING OF AN  UNACCENTED SYLLABLE   U FOLLOWED ...
IAMBIC PENTAMETER <ul><li>U  /  U  /  U  /  U  /  U  / </li></ul><ul><li>One day I wrote her name u pon the strand, </li><...
RHYME SCHEME <ul><li>Shakespearean Sonnet rhyme scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg </li></ul><ul><li>Note: There is another type...
SHAKESPEARE’S SONNET 18 <ul><li>Shall I compare thee to a summer's d ay ? </li></ul><ul><li>Thou art more lovely and more ...
THOUGHT STRUCTURE <ul><li>Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet </li></ul><ul><li>Each quatrain (four lines) describes an ...
SONNET 18 <ul><li>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? </li></ul><ul><li>Thou art more lovely and more temperate: </li>...
SONNET 30 <ul><li>When to the sessions of sweet silent thought </li></ul><ul><li>I summon up remembrance of things past, <...
SONNET 30 <ul><li>In the first quatrain, the speaker remembers the past and laments the damage that time brings  </li></ul...
YOUR TURN <ul><li>In groups of 3-4, write a sonnet quatrain using the handout as your guide.  </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure ...
 
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The Sonnet

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The Sonnet

  1. 1. THE SHAKESPEAREAN SONNET
  2. 2. A SONNET IS <ul><li>A lyric poem consisting of fourteen lines </li></ul><ul><li>Written in iambic pentameter with a definite rhyme scheme and a definite thought structure </li></ul>
  3. 3. IAMBIC PENTAMETER CONSISTS OF FIVE IAMBS AN IAMB IS A METRICAL FOOT CONSISTING OF AN UNACCENTED SYLLABLE U FOLLOWED BY AN ACCENTED SYLLABLE / . <ul><li>U / </li></ul><ul><li>a gain </li></ul><ul><li>U / U / </li></ul><ul><li>im mor tal ize </li></ul>
  4. 4. IAMBIC PENTAMETER <ul><li>U / U / U / U / U / </li></ul><ul><li>One day I wrote her name u pon the strand, </li></ul><ul><li>U / U / U / U / U / </li></ul><ul><li>But came the waves and wash ed it a way: </li></ul><ul><li>U / U / U / U / U / </li></ul><ul><li>A gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand, </li></ul><ul><li>U / U / U / U / U / </li></ul><ul><li>But came the tide, and made my pains his prey </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Edmund Spenser, Amoretti, Sonnet 75 </li></ul></ul></ul></ul></ul> 1 2 3 4 5
  5. 5. RHYME SCHEME <ul><li>Shakespearean Sonnet rhyme scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg </li></ul><ul><li>Note: There is another type of sonnet, called Petrarchan, with a different rhyme scheme, but we won’t worry about that right now. </li></ul>
  6. 6. SHAKESPEARE’S SONNET 18 <ul><li>Shall I compare thee to a summer's d ay ? </li></ul><ul><li>Thou art more lovely and more temper ate : </li></ul><ul><li>Rough winds do shake the darling buds of M ay , </li></ul><ul><li>And summer's lease hath all too short a d ate : </li></ul><ul><li>Sometime too hot the eye of heaven sh ines , </li></ul><ul><li>And often is his gold complexion d immed , </li></ul><ul><li>And every fair from fair sometime decl ines , </li></ul><ul><li>By chance, or nature's changing course untr immed : </li></ul><ul><li>But thy eternal summer shall not f ade , </li></ul><ul><li>Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st , </li></ul><ul><li>Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his sh ade , </li></ul><ul><li>When in eternal lines to time thou gr ow'st , </li></ul><ul><li>So long as men can breathe, or eyes can s ee , </li></ul><ul><li>So long lives this, and this gives life to th ee . </li></ul>A B A B C D C D E F E F G G
  7. 7. THOUGHT STRUCTURE <ul><li>Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet </li></ul><ul><li>Each quatrain (four lines) describes an idea or situation which leads to a conclusion or response in the couplet (the last two lines). </li></ul>
  8. 8. SONNET 18 <ul><li>Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? </li></ul><ul><li>Thou art more lovely and more temperate: </li></ul><ul><li>Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May, </li></ul><ul><li>And summer's lease hath all too short a date : </li></ul><ul><li>Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, </li></ul><ul><li>And often is his gold complexion dimmed , </li></ul><ul><li>And every fair from fair sometime declines , </li></ul><ul><li>By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: </li></ul><ul><li>But thy eternal summer shall not fade, </li></ul><ul><li>Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st , </li></ul><ul><li>Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, </li></ul><ul><li>When in eternal lines to time thou grow'st , </li></ul><ul><li>So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee . </li></ul>The first two quatrains describe the ways in which the summer’s day is inferior to the beloved. The third quatrain describes the ways in which the beloved is superior to the summer’s day. The couplet claims that his beloved’s beauty will never fade because it is preserved in this poem as long as men can breathe and eyes can see.
  9. 9. SONNET 30 <ul><li>When to the sessions of sweet silent thought </li></ul><ul><li>I summon up remembrance of things past, </li></ul><ul><li>I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, </li></ul><ul><li>And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste: </li></ul><ul><li>Then can I drown an eye (unused to flow) </li></ul><ul><li>For precious friends hid in death's dateless night, </li></ul><ul><li>And weep afresh love's long since cancell'd woe, </li></ul><ul><li>And moan the expense of many a vanish'd sight. </li></ul><ul><li>Then can I grieve at grievances foregone, </li></ul><ul><li>And heavily from woe to woe tell o'er </li></ul><ul><li>The sad account of fore-bemoaned moan, </li></ul><ul><li>Which I new pay as if not paid before. </li></ul><ul><li>But if the while I think on thee, dear friend, </li></ul><ul><li>All losses are restored and sorrows end. </li></ul>
  10. 10. SONNET 30 <ul><li>In the first quatrain, the speaker remembers the past and laments the damage that time brings </li></ul><ul><li>In the second and third quatrains, the speaker weeps about the death of friends and lost loves and feels the bitterness of old grievances </li></ul><ul><li>In the final couplet, the turn occurs: thinking of his “dear friend” ends his sorrows. </li></ul>
  11. 11. YOUR TURN <ul><li>In groups of 3-4, write a sonnet quatrain using the handout as your guide. </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure everyone in your group is involved. </li></ul><ul><li>Carefully follow the directions and make sure you go through the revision steps to craft a great sonnet. </li></ul><ul><li>Have fun learning! </li></ul>

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