From Canada to Connecticut:  A Journey through the Long Island Sound Watershed
What is a watershed? <ul><li>A  watershed  is the entire area of land that water (from streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, and ...
<ul><li>This is a map of the Long Island Sound Watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>It encompasses  6 states   </li></ul><ul><li>a...
Topography <ul><li>Water flows down from higher to lower elevations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In higher elevations, mountainou...
<ul><li>You are now going to journey through the watershed to see how each part functions and affects the Long Island Soun...
2 1
1 – Highlands, 2 – Main River <ul><li>When snow melts, the water flows downstream forming rivers or adding to existing one...
3
3- Tributaries <ul><li>Many rivers have smaller branches, called  tributaries  that meet the main river.  These  tributari...
4 4
4 – Populated Areas <ul><li>The river continues through agricultural areas and urban spaces/regions where it can pick up m...
A person throwing trash into a river is an example of  point source pollution.  The trash is being directly introduced int...
5
5 – Mouth of Estuary <ul><li>The  tributaries  and main river eventually connect to a larger body of water, the Long Islan...
Estuary
<ul><li>CONGRATULATIONS !!! </li></ul><ul><li>You have successfully traveled through our watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>Cont...
<ul><li>This is an infrared (IR) map of Connecticut.  </li></ul><ul><li>Green represents areas with green plants/farmland ...
Conclusion <ul><li>Now that you have journeyed through the LIS watershed, can you compare and contrast our watershed with ...
Online Activities <ul><li>Visit the  SoundWaters  site for interactive games about the watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>www.so...
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Watershed

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Here is the Soundwaters presentation we reviewed in class.

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  • Directions Have a class discussion about answers to questions before advancing the slide for the answers. More answers may exist, but we included a few key ones. Talking points Can you think of some negative effects? Introduction of pollution (fertilizer, garbage, smog) that could cause bioaccumulation - i ntroduction of pollution in northern states will move down and can affect southern areas Can you think of positive effects? Salt Marsh/wetlands filtering out pollutants – acts as sponge Rivers/streams carry fresh water to rural/urban areas Coastal/river clean-up event
  • Directions: Review each of the states with the students. Talking Points: Point out that the Connecticut River (the large river that starts up in Quebec) can carry fresh water down from the mountains in Canada to the LIS. You may also want to note the many other smaller rivers or tributaries in CT that drain to the LIS.
  • Talking Point Water drains from higher elevations to lower ones. High lands are the starting point of the watershed
  • Directions The following slides have #’s – Have students guess what parts each represent, then advance the slide to get the answer There are also questions throughout, so answer them before advancing the slide.
  • Talking points Note the snow melting and flowing downwards Ask the students what the brown triangles would represent as #1 Ask the students what that blue line would represent as #2
  • Directions Have students answer the question before advancing the slide
  • Directions Ask students what the animation adding to the main river would represent as #3
  • Talking points Tributaries can occur anywhere along the watershed and provide an important habitat for aquatic animals Some animals such as fish use these tributaries as breeding grounds
  • Directions ask students what #4 would represent as the areas with more colors and more dense shades of green
  • Talking points Point source pollution is introduced at a single location. Another example would be the drainage pipe from a factory being directly discharged into a body of water. Non-point source pollution occurs from an unidentifiable origin. Once the waste from animals and any other pollutants (eg fertilizer) become part of agricultural runoff, they are non-point source because you cannot say for sure which farm or animal the pollution resulted from.
  • Talking points Review the definition of estuary directions Have the students answer the questions before advancing the slide
  • Directions The following slides have #’s – Have students guess what parts each represent, then advance the slide to get the answer There are also questions throughout, so answer them before advancing the slide.
  • Directions Allow discussion time for questions before advancing the slide Talking points Further discuss the effects of large numbers of people living along bodies of water Chances of more pollution or less? What are the positive effects of people along bodies of water? (more clean-ups?)
  • Watershed

    1. 1. From Canada to Connecticut: A Journey through the Long Island Sound Watershed
    2. 2. What is a watershed? <ul><li>A watershed is the entire area of land that water (from streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, and precipitation) travels over to get to one larger body of water. </li></ul><ul><li>Watersheds are commonly named for the body of water into which they drain. We live in the Long Island Sound Watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>As the water travels over land, the watershed can be affected both by human and environmental factors. </li></ul>Long Island Sound
    3. 3. <ul><li>This is a map of the Long Island Sound Watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>It encompasses 6 states </li></ul><ul><li>and 2 countries. </li></ul>3 1 2 5 6 4 A B
    4. 4. Topography <ul><li>Water flows down from higher to lower elevations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In higher elevations, mountainous terrain, there is an increase in precipitation, which introduces a source of frozen fresh water. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>When snow melts, the water flows downstream forming rivers or adding to existing ones. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Watersheds include topographic features such as rivers, highlands, valleys, roads, and tributaries. </li></ul><ul><li>Watersheds can include populated areas such as cities and rural areas. </li></ul>
    5. 5. <ul><li>You are now going to journey through the watershed to see how each part functions and affects the Long Island Sound. </li></ul>
    6. 6. 2 1
    7. 7. 1 – Highlands, 2 – Main River <ul><li>When snow melts, the water flows downstream forming rivers or adding to existing ones. </li></ul><ul><li>What is the name of the main river in the Long Island Sound Watershed? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Connecticut River </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. 3
    9. 9. 3- Tributaries <ul><li>Many rivers have smaller branches, called tributaries that meet the main river. These tributaries are like the many small veins on a leaf. </li></ul><ul><li>Tributaries can increase the flow rate of a river and introduce nutrients or even pollution. </li></ul>
    10. 10. 4 4
    11. 11. 4 – Populated Areas <ul><li>The river continues through agricultural areas and urban spaces/regions where it can pick up more nutrients and pollutants. </li></ul><ul><li>As water flows near your home and school, can you identify variables that can affect water quality? </li></ul>
    12. 12. A person throwing trash into a river is an example of point source pollution. The trash is being directly introduced into the water by that person. Agricultural runoff including animal waste and fertilizers are examples of non-point source pollution (NPS). Once the waste is carried by water, you cannot pinpoint the exact animal from which it came. NPS pollution occurs over a larger area.
    13. 13. 5
    14. 14. 5 – Mouth of Estuary <ul><li>The tributaries and main river eventually connect to a larger body of water, the Long Island Sound. </li></ul><ul><li>The Long Island Sound is an estuary . </li></ul><ul><li>What is an estuary ? </li></ul><ul><li>What are some freshwater inputs? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rivers, streams, rain </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is the saltwater input? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Atlantic Ocean </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Estuary
    16. 16. <ul><li>CONGRATULATIONS !!! </li></ul><ul><li>You have successfully traveled through our watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>Continue on to take a closer look at where you live within the Long Island Sound Watershed. </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>This is an infrared (IR) map of Connecticut. </li></ul><ul><li>Green represents areas with green plants/farmland </li></ul><ul><li>Purple represents populated areas such as cities </li></ul><ul><li>What do you notice about the distribution of the purple color? </li></ul><ul><li>Where do you see most of it? </li></ul><ul><li>The arrows indicate heavily populated areas. </li></ul><ul><li>What are they located next to? </li></ul>Rivers Coastline Stamford Hartford <ul><li>Why would people choose to live near bodies of water? </li></ul><ul><li>Why do you think populations are more dense around rivers? </li></ul>Long Island Sound
    18. 18. Conclusion <ul><li>Now that you have journeyed through the LIS watershed, can you compare and contrast our watershed with another one? </li></ul><ul><li>What factors of water quality would you like to test? Find out if they are the ones we will test in your classrooms when SoundWaters visits your school. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Online Activities <ul><li>Visit the SoundWaters site for interactive games about the watershed. </li></ul><ul><li>www.soundwaters.org </li></ul><ul><li>Student login: SWstudent09 </li></ul><ul><li>Student password: watershed </li></ul>

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