Chinese Medicines<br />By Amy Tran, Cathy Frey, Helen Nguyen and Tiffany Kyu<br />
Origins of Chinese Herbs<br />By Cathy Frey<br />A Chinese herb shop<br />
Aloe Vera (蘆薈)<br />By Cathy Frey<br /><ul><li>Aloe grows in the arid regions of the Old World.</li></li></ul><li>Chrysant...
Hibiscus (芙蓉)<br />Hibiscus is a group of herbs, shrubs, and trees.<br />By Cathy Frey<br />
Tigers (老虎)<br /><ul><li>Currently: practitioners refuse to use tiger bones </li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
Musk Deer (香獐子)<br /><ul><li>Part used: musk (greasy secretion found in glandular sac)</li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
Rhinoceros (犀牛)<br /><ul><li>Part used: decocted rhinoceros horn (boiled rhinoceros horn)</li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
Black Bear (黑熊)<br />Part used: bear bile (fluid secreted by liver)<br />By Tiffany Kyu<br />
Seahorse (海馬)<br />About 90 health and medicine products contain seahorse<br />By Tiffany Kyu<br />
Chinese Massage<br />Two types of Massage<br /><ul><li>Tui Na
ZhiYa</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
Tui Na<br /><ul><li>Hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese Taoist and martial arts principles to bring the body to bala...
Zhi Ya<br /><ul><li>Based on acupressure</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
Gua Sha<br /><ul><li>“To scrape away disease by allowing the disease to escape as sandy-looking objects through the skin”<...
Principle of Massage<br />body has a network of pathways that transport qi and blood<br />By: Helen Nguyen<br />
Acupuncture<br /><ul><li>The procedure of inserting and manipulating filiform needles into various points on the body</li>...
Theories About Acupuncture<br />By inserting the needle into a certain pressure point, it is said to unblock the qi (energ...
Traditional Diagnosis<br />In order to diagnose the patient the acupuncturist asks questions based on   &quot;patterns of ...
Fire Cupping (拔罐)<br />Cupping is a method of applying acupressure by creating a relative vacuum next to the patient&apos;...
Ear<br /><ul><li>believed to be the greatest “key to the body”. </li></ul>By: Amy Tran<br />
Works Cited<br />www.drshen.com/chinesemedicineorigin.htm<br />www.logoi.com/notes/chinese_medicine.html<br />http://advoc...
The End<br />
Chinesemedicine
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Chinesemedicine

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  • The origins of Chinese herbs date back to China 4,000 years ago.The geographical origins of herbs in China are uncertain. The western Han Dynasty were the first to put to use the herbs they found.Shen Nung discovered properties of various vegetables and plants by testing their effects on his body. The earliest record of traditional Chinese medicine is The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Classic
  • Parts used:Juice from leavesUses:Mild laxative, wash for piles, treats abscesses, scabies; increases menstrual flowCosmetics Medicinal preparations for: acne, mouth ulcers, insect bitesTemporary relief of arthritic pain
  • Cultivation began hundreds of years ago in the Far EastThe significance of the chrysanthemum to the East is like the rose to the WestTypes:Chrysanthemum morifolumFlower uses: stimulate blood circulation; give clear vision; treat liver weakness, circulation problems, nervous problems, mestrual disorders, digestive problems, night blindness; improve potencyChrysanthemum incidiumFlower uses: treat skin infections, high blood pressureStem uses: treats skin infections
  • All parts of the plant secrete milky sapTypes:FicusPumilaStem & Leave Uses: tonic for fever; treat wounds, boils, piles, sore throat, dysentery, rheumatismFig Uses: relieves herniaRoot Uses: induce urination; treat inflammation of the bladderFicusRetusaFig Uses: pain killerLeaf & Bud Uses: treat conjunctivitisAerial Root Uses: treat rheumatism, swollen feet, aching teeth
  • Flowers are large and colorfulTypes:Hibiscus rosa-sinensisLeaf & flower uses: treat skin disease, mumps; relieve feverHibiscus syriacusBark, root, & flower uses: treat dysentery, indigestion, nausea, internal bleedingHibiscus mutabilisLeaf & flower uses: pain killer; expel phlegm; treat excessive bleeding during menstruation, painful urination, inflammation, snake bites
  • Part used: bones Used in:Wines, PlastersManufactured medicinesBelieved to cure:Arthritis Other joint problemsAlternatives:Bones of wild mole rat
  • Basis of:300 traditional Chinese medicineRemedies in western homeopathic medicinePerfumeUsed to:Promote circulationTreat skin infectionTreat abdominal painAlternatives:Muskrat, two species of civet, and synthetic materials
  • Used to treat:FeversConvulsionsDelirium Rhinoceros horns are very popular, so the population of rhinoceroses are decreasingCaptive breeding helps to protect the species of rhinoceroses
  • Treats sicknesses and injuries such as:Liver ailmentsHeadachesBears are locked in cages and bile is extracted from bear using catheterProcess is painful and deadly to bearsSubstitutes for bear bile is out there, but many prefer the real thing
  • Used forTreating kidney ailmentsCirculatory issuesImpotence (Condition of being weak)Seahorse has been a part of traditional Chinese medicine for hundreds of yearsToday, about 90 health and medicine products in China and other areas have seahorse
  • Both based on Traditional Chinese Medicine GuaShaA type of massage to get rid of fever
  • Chinesemedicine

    1. 1. Chinese Medicines<br />By Amy Tran, Cathy Frey, Helen Nguyen and Tiffany Kyu<br />
    2. 2. Origins of Chinese Herbs<br />By Cathy Frey<br />A Chinese herb shop<br />
    3. 3. Aloe Vera (蘆薈)<br />By Cathy Frey<br /><ul><li>Aloe grows in the arid regions of the Old World.</li></li></ul><li>Chrysanthemum (菊花)<br />By Cathy Frey<br /><ul><li>The significance of the chrysanthemum to the East is like the rose to the West</li></li></ul><li>Ficus (無花果屬)<br /><ul><li>Originated from the tropics of the Old World</li></ul>By Cathy Frey<br />
    4. 4. Hibiscus (芙蓉)<br />Hibiscus is a group of herbs, shrubs, and trees.<br />By Cathy Frey<br />
    5. 5. Tigers (老虎)<br /><ul><li>Currently: practitioners refuse to use tiger bones </li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
    6. 6. Musk Deer (香獐子)<br /><ul><li>Part used: musk (greasy secretion found in glandular sac)</li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
    7. 7. Rhinoceros (犀牛)<br /><ul><li>Part used: decocted rhinoceros horn (boiled rhinoceros horn)</li></ul>By Tiffany Kyu<br />
    8. 8. Black Bear (黑熊)<br />Part used: bear bile (fluid secreted by liver)<br />By Tiffany Kyu<br />
    9. 9. Seahorse (海馬)<br />About 90 health and medicine products contain seahorse<br />By Tiffany Kyu<br />
    10. 10. Chinese Massage<br />Two types of Massage<br /><ul><li>Tui Na
    11. 11. ZhiYa</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
    12. 12. Tui Na<br /><ul><li>Hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese Taoist and martial arts principles to bring the body to balance</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
    13. 13. Zhi Ya<br /><ul><li>Based on acupressure</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
    14. 14. Gua Sha<br /><ul><li>“To scrape away disease by allowing the disease to escape as sandy-looking objects through the skin”</li></ul>By Helen Nguyen<br />
    15. 15. Principle of Massage<br />body has a network of pathways that transport qi and blood<br />By: Helen Nguyen<br />
    16. 16. Acupuncture<br /><ul><li>The procedure of inserting and manipulating filiform needles into various points on the body</li></ul>By Amy Tran<br />
    17. 17. Theories About Acupuncture<br />By inserting the needle into a certain pressure point, it is said to unblock the qi (energy)<br />By Amy Tran<br />
    18. 18. Traditional Diagnosis<br />In order to diagnose the patient the acupuncturist asks questions based on &quot;patterns of disharmony&quot;<br />By Amy Tran<br />
    19. 19. Fire Cupping (拔罐)<br />Cupping is a method of applying acupressure by creating a relative vacuum next to the patient&apos;s skin<br />By Amy Tran<br />
    20. 20. Ear<br /><ul><li>believed to be the greatest “key to the body”. </li></ul>By: Amy Tran<br />
    21. 21. Works Cited<br />www.drshen.com/chinesemedicineorigin.htm<br />www.logoi.com/notes/chinese_medicine.html<br />http://advocacy.britannica.com/blog/advocacy/2007/10/traditional-chinese-medicine-and-endangered-animals/<br />http://tcm.health-info.org/tuina/tcm-tuina-massage.htm        <br />http://www.massageangels.com/articles/types_of_massage.html<br />Chinese Medicinal Herbs by Wee Yeow Chin & Hsuan Keng<br />
    22. 22. The End<br />

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